South Asian Studies Council

The MacMillan Center 

210 Luce Hall, 203.436.3517

http://southasia.macmillan.yale.edu

Chair
A. Mushfiq Mobarak (School of Management)

Associate Chair
Harry Blair (Political Science)

Professors Tim Barringer (History of Art), Michael Dove (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Phyllis Granoff (Religious Studies), Inderpal Grewal (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Alan Mikhail (History), A. Mushfiq Mobarak (School of Management), Kishwar Rizvi (History of Art), Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan (Anthropology), Shyam Sunder (School of Management), Steven Wilkinson (Political Science)

Associate Professors Nihal DeLanerolle (School of Medicine), Mayur Desai (Public Health), Zareena Grewal (American Studies; Religious Studies), Karuna Mantena (Political Science), Andrew Quintman (Religious Studies)

Assistant Professors Rohit De (History), Subhashini Kaligotla (​History of Art​), Priyasha Mukhopadhyay (English​)

Senior Lecturer Geetanjali Singh Chanda (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies)

Lecturer Carol Carpenter (Forestry & Environmental Studies)

Senior Lectors Seema Khurana (Hindi), Swapna Sharma (Hindi)

Students with an interest in South Asian Studies should apply to one of the University’s degree-granting departments, such as Anthropology, History, Political Science, Economics, or Religious Studies. The South Asian Studies Council is part of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies. It has been organized to provide guidance to graduate students who desire to use the resources of the departments of the University that offer South Asia-related courses.

The South Asian Studies Council aims to bring together faculty and students sharing an interest in South Asia, and it supplements the curriculum with seminars, conferences, and special lectures by scholars from Yale as well as visiting scholars. It provides information concerning grants, fellowships, research programs, and foreign study opportunities.

Language instruction is offered in Hindi and Sanskrit. Students planning to undertake field research or language study in South Asia may apply to the council for summer fellowship support.


For information and program materials, contact the South Asian Studies Council, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; or visit our website, http://southasia.macmillan.yale.edu.

Courses

HNDI 510a, Elementary HindiStaff

An in-depth introduction to modern Hindi, including the Devanagari script. Through a combination of graded texts, written assignments, audiovisual material, and computer-based exercises, the course provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Emphasis placed on spontaneous self-expression in the language. No prior background in Hindi assumed.
HTBA

HNDI 520b, Elementary Hindi IIStaff

Continuation of HNDI 510.
HTBA

HNDI 530a, Intermediate Hindi ISwapna Sharma and Seema Khurana

First half of a two-term sequence designed to develop proficiency in the four language skill areas. Extensive use of cultural documents including feature films, radio broadcasts, and literary and nonliterary texts to increase proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Focus on cultural nuances and various Hindi literary traditions. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression in the language. Prerequisite: HNDI 520 or equivalent.
MTWThF 11:35am-12:25pm

HNDI 532a, Accelerated Hindi ISwapna Sharma

Development of increased proficiency in the four language skills. Focus on reading and higher language functions such as narration, description, and comparison. Reading strategies for parsing paragraph-length sentences in Hindi newspapers. Discussion of political, social, and cultural dimensions of Hindi culture as well as contemporary global issues.
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

HNDI 540b, Intermediate Hindi IISeema Khurana and Swapna Sharma

Continuation of HNDI 530, focusing on further development of proficiency in the four language skill areas. Prerequisite: HNDI 530 or equivalent.
MTWThF 11:35am-12:25pm

HNDI 542b, Accelerated Hindi IISwapna Sharma

Continuation of HNDI 532. Development of increased proficiency in the four language skills. Focus on reading and higher language functions such as narration, description, and comparison. Reading strategies for parsing paragraph-length sentences in Hindi newspapers. Discussion of political, social, and cultural dimensions of Hindi culture as well as contemporary global issues. Prerequisite: HNDI 532 or equivalent.
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

HNDI 550a, Advanced HindiSeema Khurana

An advanced language course aimed at enabling students to engage in fluent discourse in Hindi and to achieve a comprehensive knowledge of formal grammar. Introduction to a variety of styles and levels of discourse and usage. Emphasis on the written language, with readings on general topics from newspapers, books, and magazines. Prerequisite: HNDI 540 or permission of instructor.
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

HNDI 598b, Advanced TutorialSwapna Sharma

For students with advanced Hindi language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered by the department. The work must be supervised by an adviser and must terminate in a term paper or its equivalent. Prerequisites: HNDI 540, and submission of a detailed project proposal and its approval by the language studies coordinator.
HTBA

SAST 562a / RLST 567a, Readings in Pali TextsPhyllis Granoff

In this course we read a selection of ritual texts from India’s three classical religions, Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism. Prerequisite: a knowledge of Sanskrit.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

SAST 639a, Islam in Modern South AsiaNaveena Naqvi

The partition of British India in 1947 produced the separate Muslim-majority and Hindu-majority states of Pakistan and India. This moment was the culmination of a long historical arc, in which religious identities were transformed and politicized under colonialism. The course examines this process, tracing the development of a spectrum of modern Muslim subjectivities from the advent of colonial rule to the present. Some of the questions addressed are: How did the history of Muslim sovereignty continue to inform colonial and nationalist self-definitions? How did Islamic institutions reform under colonialism and under what circumstances did Islamic revivalists resist colonial rule? To what extent were these developments connected with or separate from processes in other parts of the British empire? In response to these questions, the first part of the course considers a range of variables, such as the influence of modernizing Muslim ideologues, the role of Christian missionaries, the introduction of the printing press, and the creation of modern madrasa schools. In later weeks, as we trace the emergence of electoral politics and the violent partition of India in the twentieth century, we address how contemporary South Asian Muslim identities intersected with other articulations of identity such as caste, gender, class, and political ideologies.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

SKRT 510a, Introductory Sanskrit IAleksandar Uskokov

An introduction to Sanskrit language and grammar. Focus on learning to read and translate basic Sanskrit sentences in the Indian Devanagari script. No prior background in Sanskrit assumed. Credit only on completion of SKRT 520/LING 525.
MTWThF 9:25am-10:15am

SKRT 520b, Introductory Sanskrit IIStaff

Continuation of SKRT 510/LING 515. Focus on the basics of Sanskrit grammar; readings from classical Sanskrit texts written in the Indian Devanagari script. Prerequisite: SKRT 510/LING 515.
MTWThF 9:25am-10:15am

SKRT 530a, Intermediate Sanskrit IAleksandar Uskokov

The first half of a two-term sequence aimed at helping students develop the skills necessary to read texts written in Sanskrit. Readings include selections from the Hitopadesa, Kathasaritsagara, Mahabharata, and Bhagavad Gita. Prerequisite: SKRT 520 or equivalent.
MWF 8:20am-9:10am

SKRT 540b / LING 548b, Intermediate Sanskrit IIStaff

Continuation of LING 538, focusing on Sanskrit literature from the kavya genre. Readings include selections from the Jatakamala of Aryasura and the opening verses of Kalidasa’s Kumarasambhava. Prerequisite: LING 538/SKRT 530 or equivalent.
MWF 10:30am-11:20am