Courses

NURS 903b, Research Methods III: Measurement of Health VariablesJane Dixon

This course focuses on theory of measurement and reliability and validity of research instruments—with emphasis on interaction of conceptual, methodological, and pragmatic considerations. An integration of seminar and lecture is employed. Required of all second-year Ph.D. students in nursing. Open to advanced graduate students in other schools of the University. Three hours per week for seven weeks.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 904a, Research Methods IV: Mixed MethodsM Tish Knobf

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of mixed methods research. This overview consists of the history, philosophical foundations, purpose, data collection, analysis, and evaluation of the common mixed methods designs. Required of all Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week for seven weeks.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 905a, Research Methods V: Intervention DevelopmentLois Sadler

This seminar focuses on the research methods necessary for the understanding, developing, and testing of interventions to improve outcomes in health and illness. Content includes the use of various approaches to the development of biobehavioral interventions. The second half of the module deals with methodological issues in carrying out clinical intervention research. Required of all second-year Ph.D. students in nursing. Open to others with permission of the instructors. Three hours per week for seven weeks.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 906a, Dissertation Seminar IJane Dixon

This required doctoral course provides the student with advanced study and direction in research leading to development of the dissertation proposal and completion of the dissertation. Students are guided in the application of the fundamentals of scientific writing and criticism. All Ph.D. students in nursing are required to take this seminar every term. Three hours per month.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 907b, Dissertation Seminar IINancy Redeker

This required doctoral course provides the student with advanced study and direction in research leading to development of the dissertation proposal and completion of the dissertation. Students are guided in the application of the fundamentals of scientific writing and criticism. All Ph.D. students in nursing are required to take this seminar every term. Three hours per month.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 910a, Science, Scholarship, and Communication of Knowledge IIIMargaret Grey

This is the third course in a four-course sequence designed to socialize the student into the roles and responsibilities of a Ph.D.-prepared nurse scientist. Students develop specific beginning competencies necessary to engage in a career as an independent nurse scientist, including intermediate principles and processes of grant writing and communicating research results. The NURS 908, 909, 910, 911 seminar series accompanies the research practicum and is required of all Ph.D. students in nursing. One hour every other week.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 911b, Science, Scholarship, and Communication of Knowledge IVMargaret Grey

This is the fourth course in a four-course sequence designed to socialize the student into the roles and responsibilities of a Ph.D.-prepared nurse scientist. Students develop specific beginning competencies necessary to engage in a career as an independent nurse scientist, including advanced principles and processes of grant writing and communicating research results. The NURS 908, 909, 910, 911 seminar series accompanies the research practicum and is required of all Ph.D. students in nursing. One hour every other week.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 916a, Advanced Qualitative Research MethodsHolly Kennedy

This course provides the opportunity for doctoral students to engage more deeply in all aspects of qualitative research. Guided seminars examine methodological issues in qualitative research and explore emerging methodologies. Students gain knowledge in sampling strategies, data collection, analysis, and writing. Students gain skill with the ATLAS.ti software program to analyze data. This course is appropriate for Ph.D. students planning to employ qualitative methods in research. Three hours per week (two in class; one in project).  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 922b, Introduction to Clinical Research InformaticsJulie Womack

This course provides an introduction to informatics, focusing on clinical research informatics. There are lectures and discussion on data science and big data storage, including relational databases as well as some of the newer approaches to data storage. The course explores the use of the electronic health record as a source of data and investigates issues that impact data quality and analysis. It also covers data standards, metadata, and provenance, and it briefly introduces the uses of natural language processing, machine learning, data mining, and ontologies. Hands-on sessions include an introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL) and the use of SAS for visualizing data. Optional for second-year Ph.D. students. Open to others with permission of the instructor.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 941b, Health Policy, Leadership, and SystemsLisa Summers

The course addresses salient issues in health policy and the challenges to linking research and clinical care with public and private policy agendas. The course covers the following topics: health care delivery systems; policy and political factors that affect access to care and its financing, delivery, and quality; challenges to evidence-based policy and the dissemination of research findings to policy and community-based leaders. It also includes theories of leadership and policy change relevant to students’ research topics. Critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and research-based analysis are integrated throughout the course. A major written assignment suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal (or that can be easily modified for same) is a course requirement. Prerequisite: students must pass a test based on the online Yale University School of Nursing Health Policy Module. Required of all Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 5010a, Issues in NursingSarah Korpak

This course explores personal and professional issues affecting the ability of a nurse to deliver professional nursing care. Content includes ethical, legal, cultural, and other policy-related aspects of nursing practice. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. Two hours every other week.  1 Course cr
M 4:30pm-6:30pm

NURS 5030a and NURS 5031b, Biomedical Foundations of Health and DiseaseSharen McKay

This course is offered in the fall/spring terms of the first GEPN year. Lectures focus on the basic scientific principles of physiology and include an introduction to pathophysiology. Anatomical, biochemical, and developmental features are involved in discussion of the inseparable structural-functional relations within the human body. Topics include physiology, biochemistry, immunology, genetics, introductory embryology, and microbiology. In addition, the course addresses topics introduced in NURS 5160, NURS 5170, and NURS 5171. Required of all students in the prespecialty year, four hours per week.  3 Course cr per term
MTh 10am-11:50am

NURS 5040a and NURS 5041b, Advanced Health AssessmentPatrice O'Neill-Wilhelm and Kassandra August-Marcucio

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to conduct a comprehensive health history and physical examination across the lifespan for the professional registered nurse (R.N.). Emphasis is on the assessment of physical, developmental, psychosocial (cognitive, affective, and behavioral), cultural, and spiritual dimensions of the client and/or families, as well as factors that influence behavioral responses to health and illness. Required of all students in the prespecialty year.  2½ Course cr per term
F 8am-10am

NURS 5060a and NURS 5061b, Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical ExperienceLinda Honan, Philip Martinez, Deborah Fahs, and Wendy Mackey

The Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience (ILCE) is designed to prepare first-year health professional students to function effectively in the clinical environment. The ILCE is a foundational course on interprofessional education for students in the GEPN program to prepare them for their future roles as nurse practitioners or certified nurse-midwives. The structure and content of the curriculum are based on the needs of our current health care and academic environment. These include an increasingly complex and specialized health care system and national accreditation requirements. Patients have complicated psychosocial and medical problems that affect their health and that often require coordinated team care. And accreditation bodies require that trainees start learning about these complexities and have experiences learning together early in training. Yale School of Nursing faculty, in conjunction with Yale School of Medicine and Physician Associate program faculty, guide groups of students in planned interprofessional clinical experiences in a consistent clinical setting. Experiences are designed to help students begin to build a working knowledge of the clinical environment and health care organizations, and to learn with, from, and about each other through the activities associated with the ILCE program. Experiences also include planned group meetings designed to teach patient- and family-centered interviewing, physical examination skills, simulation, clinical reasoning, and oral presentation skills. Required of all students in the prespecialty year.  1 Course cr
MF 1pm-5pm

NURS 5090a, Introduction to Drug TherapyLisa Meland

Lectures focus on the appropriate clinical use of drugs. Emphasis is placed on pharmacology, side effects, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and the therapeutic use of medications across the populations. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. Integrated throughout the curriculum in the prespecialty year.  3 Course cr
MTh 8am-9:50am

NURS 5110a, Clinical Applications of Human AnatomyLinda Honan, Philip Martinez, and Patrice O'Neill-Wilhelm

The effective assessment, diagnosis, and management of disease depend on knowledge of the structures of human beings. This introductory course reviews and discusses the structure and function of the major body systems. The aim of the course is to combine clinically relevant anatomical information with performance of clinical skills that will form the basis of clinical reasoning. Correlation of anatomical knowledge with clinical presentation both in the classroom and in the laboratory is emphasized. Required of all students in the prespecialty year.  2 Course cr
Th 1pm-4pm

NURS 5140b, Clinical Practice in Maternal-Newborn NursingSascha James-Conterelli and Erin Morelli

This course focuses on clinical practice essential to nursing care of women, newborns, and their families throughout the childbearing cycle and the neonatal period. Clinical settings include hospital and ambulatory care.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 5150b, Maternal-Newborn NursingSascha James-Conterelli and Erin Morelli

This course presents theory essential to the provision of nursing care to childbearing families throughout the childbearing cycle, the neonatal period, and the pre- and interconceptional phases. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized. Required of all students in the prespecialty year.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 5160a, Clinical Practice in Medical-Surgical NursingPhilip Martinez and Sarah Korpak

This course focuses on the scientific principles, psychomotor techniques, and communication skills fundamental to nursing practice. Sociocultural variations influencing patient care are introduced. Faculty guide small groups of students in individually planned clinical experiences that provide opportunities to use the nursing process in caring for the hospitalized adult with selected pathophysiological problems. Experience also includes weekly clinical conferences and selected observational experiences. Clinical experience twelve hours per week.  4 Course cr
TW 9am-5pm

NURS 5170a and NURS 5171b, Medical-Surgical NursingLinda Honan, Philip Martinez, and Deborah Fahs

This course focuses on the dynamic relationship between physical and psychosocial responses to pathophysiological problems occurring in the hospitalized adult and older adults. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized. Required of all students in the prespecialty year.  2 Course cr per term
F 10am-11:50am

NURS 5180b, Clinical Practice in Pediatric NursingWendy Mackey

Utilizing a family-centered approach, this course provides clinical experience in identifying and assessing children’s physiological and developmental needs, and planning, implementing, and evaluating a plan of nursing care to meet the needs of a particular child and the child’s family in health care settings. Students have opportunities to use principles of growth and development, knowledge of the child’s and family’s physical and emotional responses to illness, and principles of pediatric nursing in caring for children and their families. The student gains skill and knowledge in the nursing role and an appreciation for the importance of utilizing research findings in practice and collaborating with other health professionals.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 5190b, Pediatric NursingWendy Mackey

This course presents theory essential to promote health and adaptation to illness for children and their families. Emphasis is placed on growth and development, as well as pathophysiological, social, environmental, and cultural factors that influence children’s and families’ response to health and illness. Required of all students in the prespecialty year.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 5200b, Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health NursingDilice Robertson and Tina Walde

This course builds on skills learned in medical-surgical nursing by providing clinical experience in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating a plan of nursing care to meet the unique needs of patients with acute and chronic psychiatric disabilities across the lifespan. Students gain skills in the use of therapeutic communication, working with the interdisciplinary team, and implementing all phases of the nurse-patient relationship while applying concepts taught in NURS 5210.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 5210b, Psychiatric–Mental Health NursingDilice Robertson and Tina Walde

In combination with NURS 5200, this seminar provides the foundations of understanding and treating psychiatric disabilities within a bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural-theoretical framework of health promotion and disease prevention related to both mental health and mental illness. Course content includes the pathophysiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of cognitive, perceptual, emotional, behavioral, and interpersonal symptoms associated with common psychiatric diagnoses for individuals with mental illness and their families across the lifespan. Students analyze the economic, legal, and ethical issues that influence care in a variety of settings. Four hours per week, first half of spring or summer term, as assigned.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6000a, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN StudentsNicole Colline

This course is required of all RNs entering the M.S.N. program regardless of specialty. It is conducted over the summer and designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to conduct a comprehensive health history and physical examination for the advanced practice registered nurse. Emphasis is on the assessment of physical, psychosocial (cognitive, affective, behavioral), spiritual, and cultural dimensions of the client, as well as factors that influence behavioral responses to health and illness. Normal/abnormal variations in physical exam findings and differential diagnoses are presented.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6010a, Advanced PathophysiologyMary-Ann Cyr

This course provides students with advanced physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts central to understanding maintenance of health and the prevention and management of disease across the lifespan. Content on cellular function, genetics, immunology, inflammation, infection, and stress and adaptation provides the framework on which further specialty content knowledge is built. Current research, case studies, and application to advanced nursing practice are highlighted. This is a core course. Required of all M.S.N. students in the first year of specialization.  3 Course cr
M 1:30pm-4:20pm

NURS 6020b, Advanced PharmacologyElizabeth Cohen

This course is designed for APRN and master’s-level students to build upon their introduction to drug therapy course. Principles of pharmacology are presented through the study of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Emphasis is placed on drug categories, mechanisms of action, and side effects. Following initial content on general principles, applied interpretation of some of the most common clinical indications and considerations for prescribing are addressed. Student participation demonstrates understanding of clinical applications of pharmacologic principles and concepts. This is a core course. Required of all M.S.N. students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6040b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice NursingRobin Whittemore and Canhua Xiao

This course provides theoretical and practical experience in appraisal and application of research evidence into practice. The emphasis is on applying that knowledge to the critique of published research. This is a core course. Required of all M.S.N. students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week and online modules.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6050a, Transitions to Professional PracticeHolly Kennedy and Jonathan Johnson

Advanced practice nursing occurs in contexts that inevitably influence practice. This course provides students an integrative experience in applying health policy, organizational, regulatory, safety, quality, and ethical concepts to care. It provides the opportunity for students to explore the theoretical and practical considerations underlying the roles of advanced practice nurses (leader, educator, researcher, advocate, clinician, and consultant). The course is organized into modules incorporating the following content areas, explored utilizing a case-based approach: Regulation and Scope of Practice; Leadership and Organizational Dynamics; Health Care Access, Coverage, and Finance; Clinical Ethics; and Safety and Quality. This is a core course. Required of all M.S.N. students in the final year. This is a hybrid course that includes on-site interactive seminars as well as online asynchronous sessions. Group work and preparation are expectations outside of the classroom.  2 Course cr
Th 4:30pm-6:20pm

NURS 6060a, Promoting Health in the CommunityVeronica Barcelona and David Vlahov

This course is a synthesis and application of the process of health promotion, public health, community organization, and epidemiological principles. Emphasis is on prevention of disease, health maintenance, health promotion, and care of the sick within households, families, groups, and communities, across the lifespan. This is a core course. Required of all M.S.N. students in the final year. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
Th 2pm-3:50pm

NURS 6070a, Mental Health Management for Advanced Practice NursesLindsay Powell

The focus of this course is to provide the foundation for management of commonly occurring mental health problems using the therapeutic relationship and basic models for intervention including stress management, crisis intervention, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral techniques, and pharmacotherapy. Diagnostic assessment, monitoring, and referral to specialty care and community resources are emphasized. Roles in management of commonly occurring mental health problems (anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance) and collaboration to manage severe and persistent mental illness (including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use and eating disorders) and referral to community and psychiatric resources are examined. Required of all adult gerontology primary care, family, and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students. Open to others with permission of the instructor. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
T 2pm-4pm

NURS 6080a, Master’s Independent StudyStaff

This elective study is initiated by the student and negotiated with faculty. The purpose is to allow in-depth pursuit of individual areas of interest and/or practice. A written proposal must be submitted and signed by the student, the faculty member(s), and the appropriate specialty director. Credit varies according to the terms of the contract.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6100a, Advanced Concepts and Principles of Diabetes CareElizabeth Doyle

This seminar focuses on the concepts and principles of diabetes managed care based on the annually updated American Diabetes Association Standards of Care. It includes principles of primary care (screening, early detection, intervention, and patient education), secondary care principles related to diabetes management (various treatment modalities, patient education, and self-care), and tertiary care related to complications. These concepts and principles of care are presented relative to type of diabetes (type 1, type 2, gestational, diabetes in pregnancy, and secondary), age, developmental stage, duration of disease, and ethnicity. A multidisciplinary approach to care issues is emphasized, incorporating the contributions of other disciplines in the collaborative management of diabetes. Important aspects of living with a chronic illness such as psychological, social, occupational, and economic are also emphasized. Required of all students in the diabetes care concentration in the final year. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
M 11am-1pm, T 6pm-8pm

NURS 6110a and NURS 6111b, Clinical Practice in Diabetes Care and ManagementElizabeth Doyle

The focus of this practicum is comprehensive management of a caseload of patients with diabetes specific to the student’s elected specialty (adult/gerontology acute care, adult/gerontology primary care, family, midwifery/women’s health, and pediatric). The spring term is an extension of the fall and focuses on the management of common problems related to long-term diabetes complications, encouraging clinical decision-making and management of comorbidities. Student’s clinical practicum in diabetes care is in various settings specific to student’s specialty program. Required of all students in the diabetes care concentration in the final year. Four hours per week of practice required both terms. One and one-half hours of clinical conference per week.  1.65 Course cr per term
M 11am-1pm

NURS 6120b, Principles of Advanced Oncology PracticeMarianne Davies

This course introduces students to the principles of advanced oncology nursing practice. It focuses on (1) the problem of cancer—the epidemiology, biology, genetics, and immunology of cancer; (2) advanced practice nursing across the cancer care continuum (prevention, detection, diagnosis, treatment, chronic illness, and end of life), emphasizing nursing strategies for promoting patient- and family-centered care; and (3) the treatment of cancer, exploring the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and short- and long-term side effects of experimental and common traditional anticancer treatment modalities, as well as complementary, palliative, and supportive care. Required of all students in the oncology concentration in the first year of specialization.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6130a and NURS 6131b, Advanced Management of Clinical Problems in OncologyMarianne Davies

This course focuses on assessment and management of complex clinical problems of adults with cancer. The role of the advanced practice nurse and the use of clinical practice guidelines to support evidence-based practice are emphasized. Required of all students in the oncology concentration in the final year. Prerequisite: NURS 6120.  1 Course cr
M 5pm-7pm

NURS 6140a and NURS 6141b, Clinical Practicum for Oncology Nurse PractitionersMarianne Davies

The goal of this practicum is to prepare students to comprehensively manage a caseload of adults with cancer. Emphasis is on anticipation of high-incidence clinical problems, development of clinical reasoning in assessment, differential diagnosis, and formulation of management strategies. The practice sites provide opportunities to understand cancer care along the trajectory of illness from diagnosis to death/bereavement, develop clinical leadership skills, and deliver high-quality supportive care to patients and families across the disease trajectory. Required of all students in the oncology concentration in the final year. Four hours per week of clinical experience plus one hour per week of clinical conference.  1½ Course cr per term
M 5pm-7pm

NURS 6150a, Research Seminar IMargaret Grey

In this course, students are assigned to a research practicum experience, set goals for the research practicum with the faculty conducting the research, and identify barriers and facilitators to the conduct of research in health and illness. Students identify a clinical research problem and review the literature about the problem. Required of M.S.N. students in the research concentration. Open to other master’s students with permission of the instructor.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6160b, Research Seminar IIMargaret Grey

In this course, students continue working on their research practicum experience, set goals for the research practicum with the faculty conducting the research, and identify barriers and facilitators to the conduct of health research. Students also develop a research proposal in their area of interest. Required of M.S.N. students in the research concentration. Open to other master’s students with permission of the instructor.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6180b, Gender and Sexuality Health Justice (GSHJ) IRonica Mukerjee

This course is a foundational course designed to provide the student with an introduction to the social, racial, and economic disparities as well as the clinical care of LGBTQIA+ patients. The course is taught through the cultural safety framework in which students are asked to view patient care through the lens of addressing barriers to care including systems barriers, institutional barriers, as well as knowledge barriers to providing actual care. The role of the nurse practitioner/midwife as a member of the health care delivery team is emphasized.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6190a, Gender and Sexuality Health Justice (GSHJ) IIRonica Mukerjee

This is the second of three GSHJ courses that prepare future nurse practitioners/midwives for competence in common clinical issues seen in LGBTQIA+ patients and communities. Topics include HIV care, treatment of substance use disorders, and in-depth care for trans and MSM patients including pelvic and anal care. This course includes CMEs/CNEs in order to prepare students for either the American Academy of HIV Medicine’s professional certification or the HIV/AIDS Nursing Certification Board’s certification.  2 Course cr
T 6:15pm-8:15pm

NURS 6200b, Gender and Sexuality Health Justice (GSHJ) IIIRonica Mukerjee

This is the third of three GSHJ courses that prepare future nurse practitioners for competence in common clinical issues seen in LGBTQIA+ patients and communities. Topics include in-depth primary care management of mental health issues and disorders experienced by LGBTQIA+ patients, and special considerations for lesbian, bisexual, queer, intersex, MSM, and asexual patients. (Trans patients are covered in GSHJ II). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration CMEs for treatment of mental health disorders are included in the curriculum to prepare students for the primary care of LGBTQIA+ students. 2.73 hours per week for 5.5 weeks.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6202a or b, Gender and Sexuality Health Justice (GSHJ) ClinicalRonica Mukerjee

This clinical conference course builds upon the experiences gained in first-year specialty clinical courses. This clinical provides students further opportunity to develop advanced nursing skills with LGBTQIA+ patients, including specialized clinical judgment and evidence-based patient management strategies learned in didactic sessions in both their specialty programs and within the GSHJ classroom.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6210a and NURS 6211b, Advanced Primary Care and Community HealthAmi Marshall

This interdisciplinary collaborative course with the School of Medicine provides the student with an experience in delivering interdisciplinary primary care to an underserved community at an urban medical clinic through a rotation at HAVEN, the Yale student-run free clinic. Students engage in near-peer teaching with other medical, physician associate, and nurse practitioner students who are at an earlier stage of their training. Students are assigned to eight Saturdays over the course of the fall and spring terms. The didactic curriculum consists of foundational knowledge regarding teaching skills and cultural diversity. This course is available to all family and adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioner students in either their first or second specialty year. Students apply for the elective and are chosen to participate at the discretion of the instructor. Students may enroll only once in the course.  2 Course cr per term
HTBA

NURS 6230b, Clinical Practice I for Global Health TrackPatricia Ryan-Krause

This clinical application course for students in the global health track provides opportunities to develop advanced nursing skills with a range of global populations within the students’ areas of specialization. While in clinical settings, students develop skills in assessment and management of acute and chronic conditions using evidence-based patient management strategies in accordance with the cultural beliefs and practices of populations of immigrants, refugees, American Indians, and Alaskan native and rural residents. These experiences may take place in YSN-approved U.S. or international settings. Additional experiences with local resettlement organizations such as Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) and Connecticut Institute for Refugees and Immigrants (CIRI) are also available. These experiences may include developing and presenting education programs to groups of refugees, immigrants, or asylum seekers; creating training materials for the resettlement agencies; or serving as a cultural companion or health navigator for newly arrived families. Required of all students pursuing the global health track during the spring term of their first specialty year. Thirty hours of face-to-face interactions either in a health care setting or in an alternative setting, and one hour per week of clinical conference. Taken before NURS 6240.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 6240a, Clinical Practice II for Global Health TrackPatricia Ryan-Krause

This clinical application course for students in the global health track provides opportunities to develop advanced nursing skills with a range of global populations within the students’ areas of specialization. While in clinical settings, students develop skills in assessment and management of acute and chronic conditions using evidence-based patient management strategies in accordance with the cultural beliefs and practices of populations of immigrants, refugees, American Indians, and Alaskan native and rural residents. These experiences may take place in YSN-approved U.S. or international settings. Additional experiences with local resettlement organizations such as Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) and Connecticut Institute for Refugees and Immigrants (CIRI) are also available. These experiences may include developing and presenting education programs to groups of refugees, immigrants, or asylum seekers; creating training materials for the resettlement agencies; or serving as a cultural companion or health navigator for newly arrived families. Required of all students pursuing the global health track during the fall term of their second specialty year. Thirty hours of face-to-face interactions either in a health care setting or in an alternative setting, and one hour per week of clinical conference. Taken after NURS 6230.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7000a, Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Specialty Health AssessmentAmi Marshall, Nicole Colline, and Virginia Sherrick

This course is designed to enhance students’ adult health assessment skills in the context of primary care for patients from adolescence through senescence. Through laboratory sessions, simulation, and clinical activities, students demonstrate achievement of culturally responsive advanced health assessment techniques, data collection, and application of appropriate technology in health assessment. Normal and abnormal adult variations are presented. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care and family nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  2 Course cr
W 9am-10:50am

NURS 7020a, Primary Care I AMonica Philipp, Monica Ordway, and Ronica Mukerjee

This course is a foundational primary care seminar module designed to provide the student with an introduction to primary care clinical practice and patient-centered health education. The role of the nurse practitioner and midwife across primary care settings and as a member of the health care delivery team is emphasized. Required of all adult/gerontology, family, midwifery/women’s health, and pediatric nurse practitioner—primary care students in the first year of specialization. Open to others with permission of the instructor. Two hours per week for the first eight weeks of the term.  1 Course cr
M 4:30pm-6:20pm

NURS 7030a, Primary Care I BRonica Mukerjee

Following NURS 7020, this is the first of three didactic courses designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. Classes focus on health promotion, disease prevention, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of common health conditions in diverse populations of patients from adolescence to senescence. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care, family, and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week for seven weeks.  1 Course cr
M 4:30pm-6:20pm

NURS 7040b, Primary Care IISoohyun Nam

This is the second of three didactic courses designed to enable students to gain the problem-solving and clinical strategies necessary for primary care practice as nurse practitioners; it builds upon content taught in NURS 7020 and NURS 7030. Classes focus on health promotion, disease prevention, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of common health conditions for diverse populations of patients from adolescence to senescence. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care, family, and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Prerequisites: NURS 5040 and NURS 5041; or NURS 6000.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7050b, Primary Care II Clinical PracticeStaff

Course content includes clinical practice in health assessment and the provision of primary and focused health care. Students meet weekly for a ninety-minute clinical seminar that is held concurrently with clinical practice. Clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to present and discuss cases and explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care and family nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Clinical seminar discussions for FNP students focus on providing care for patients across the lifespan. AGPCNP discussions focus on caring for adult and gerontologic populations, including adolescents, adults, and older adults. Taken concurrently with NURS 7040 and, for family nurse practitioner students, with NURS 7460. Eight to sixteen hours of clinical practice (fifteen weeks) and one and one-half hours of clinical seminar per week.  4½ Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7060a, Primary Care IIIAmi Marshall

This is the third of three didactic courses designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. Classes focus on health promotion and maintenance, and assessment, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of acute and chronic conditions for patients from adolescence to senescence, highlighting management of patients with complex comorbid conditions. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care and family nurse practitioner students in the final year. Taken concurrently with NURS 7070. Prerequisites: NURS 7030, NURS 7040, and NURS 7050.  2 Course cr
Th 10:30am-12:20pm

NURS 7070a, Primary Care III Clinical PracticeStaff

This clinical course builds upon the experiences gained in NURS 7050 and provides students further opportunity to develop advanced nursing skills, clinical judgment, and evidence-based patient management strategies necessary to manage common acute and chronic health care conditions. Students participate in designated weekly primary care clinical experiences arranged by faculty. In addition, students meet weekly for a ninety-minute clinical conference that is held concurrently with clinical practice. Clinical seminar discussions for family nurse practitioner students focus on family-centered care and providing care for patients across the lifespan. Clinical seminar discussions for all other students focus on providing patient-centered care for patients from adolescence to senescence. Clinical conference serves as a forum for students to present and discuss cases and explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care and family nurse practitioner students in the final year. Taken concurrently with NURS 7060 and, for family nurse practitioners, with NURS 7500. Eight to sixteen hours of clinical practice per week (fifteen weeks), and one and one-half hours of clinical conference per week. Prerequisite (or concurrent with): NURS 7050.  6 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7090b, Primary Care IV Clinical PracticeStaff

This clinical course builds upon the experiences gained in NURS 7070 and provides students further opportunity to develop advanced nursing skills, clinical judgment, and evidence-based patient management strategies necessary to manage common acute and chronic health care conditions. Students participate in designated weekly primary care clinical experiences arranged by faculty. In addition, students meet weekly for a ninety-minute clinical conference that is held concurrently with clinical practice. Clinical seminar discussions for family nurse practitioner students focus on family-centered care and providing care for patients across the lifespan. Clinical seminar discussions for all other students focus on providing patient-centered care for patients from adolescence to senescence. Clinical conference serves as a forum for students to present and discuss cases and explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care and family nurse practitioner students in the final year. Taken concurrently with NURS 7500. Eight to sixteen hours of clinical practice per week (fifteen weeks), and ninety minutes of clinical conference per week. Prerequisite: NURS 7070.  6 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7100b, Concepts and Principles of AgingOphelia Empleo-Frazier and Ami Marshall

This course introduces students to the major concepts and principles of gerontology and to a variety of biophysiological theories on aging. Health care delivery systems and care of the elderly are explored along with the current social policy initiatives and the state of the science of research as it relates to the older adult. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioner students in their first specialty year. Two hours weekly class time. Prerequisites: NURS 5040 and NURS 5041, or NURS 6000; and NURS 6040 and NURS 7000.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7104b, Advanced Primary Care of the Older AdultAmi Marshall and Ophelia Empleo-Frazier

This course focuses on the role of the nurse practitioner in the assessment, diagnosis, and management of common primary geriatric syndromes. The age-friendly health system 4M model of geriatric care (Medications, Mentation, Mobility, and what Matters most) provides the framework for clinical conditions discussed in this course. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioner students in the final year.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7110b, Advanced FNP/AGPCNP PharmacologyElizabeth Cohen

This course is designed to prepare FNP/AGPCNP students to clinically apply pharmacotherapeutics from an advanced practice approach. Students learn to identify the correct pharmaceutical agents for therapy and to develop plans to monitor the results for effectiveness and safety in a variety of advanced practice nursing clinical settings. Students learn multiple methods for obtaining pharmacological information requisite to safely prescribe and monitor effects of their pharmacological selections. Required all adult/gerontology primary care and family nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Taken concurrently with NURS 6020. The hours per week are determined by the specialty.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7200a, Women’s Health IGina Novick

The first in a series of five didactic courses provided over three terms, designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills in ambulatory care for women across the lifespan. Women’s Health I and II focus on the gynecologic and prenatal care of essentially healthy women. Women’s Health I provides foundational material and is required of all nurse-midwifery, women’s health nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, and adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  1 Course cr
M 10am-11:50am

NURS 7210a, Women’s Health IIGina Novick

The second in a series of five didactic courses provided over three terms, designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills in ambulatory care for women across the lifespan. Women’s Health I and II focus on the gynecologic and prenatal care of essentially healthy women. Women’s Health II builds on the foundation provided by Women’s Health I, providing greater depth and detail required for the women’s health specialist. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Open to others with permission of the instructor.  1 Course cr
M 10am-11:50am

NURS 7220a, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical PracticeStaff

This course provides clinical experience in basic ambulatory health care to pregnant and nonpregnant women across the lifespan, focusing on care of essentially normal women. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7230b, Women’s Health IIILoren Fields and Monica Philipp

This course is designed to build competencies in gynecologic care for women across the lifespan. Building on the foundational content and competencies introduced in the previous term, this course focuses on the evaluation and management of more complex gynecologic health conditions. Students also engage with a variety of additional advanced practice nursing competencies such as translating research evidence into evidence-based practice and counseling patients around complex decisions. Required of all nurse-midwifery, women’s health nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, and adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7235a, Childbearing Care IErin Morelli

This course prepares students to care for patients during the intrapartum, postpartum, and lactation periods of the childbearing cycle. Students also learn about the normal neonate. Online and in-person lectures of fifteen hours and skills labs are utilized. Required of all nurse-midwifery students in the first year of specialization. Prerequisite: completion of all GEPN courses or R.N. license.  1 Course cr
T 9:30am-11:30am

NURS 7240b, Women’s Health IVMonica Philipp

This course is designed to build competencies in antepartum care. Building on the foundational content and competencies introduced in the previous term, this course focuses on the outpatient monitoring and management of common complications that can occur in pregnancy. Students also engage with a variety of additional advanced practice nursing competencies such as legal and professional practice issues, improving health literacy, and counseling patients around complex decisions. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7250b, Women’s Health III and IV Clinical PracticeStaff

This course provides clinical experience in ambulatory health care to pregnant and nonpregnant women across the lifespan, focusing on care of women with complex issues and or complications. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7260b, Childbearing Care IIMichelle Telfer

This course introduces theory, skills, and management of the well woman during the intrapartum and postpartum periods. Care of the healthy newborn is also explored. Emphasis is on supporting normal physiologic birth and the transition to motherhood. Theory and evidence-based practice are presented through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, and problem-based learning case studies. Required of all nurse-midwifery students in the first year of specialization.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7270b, Childbearing Care II Clinical PracticeStaff

Students are provided with supervised clinical experience in labor, birth, newborn, and postpartum care. Students have twelve hours of clinical practice per week for twelve weeks and attend clinical conference for one hour per week. The clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of all nurse-midwifery students in the first year of specialization.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7280a, Women’s Health VLoren Fields

This course is designed to build competencies in antepartum and gynecologic care. Building on the content and competencies introduced in previous terms, this course focuses on the evaluation and management of complex gynecologic conditions and antepartum complications. Students also engage with a variety of additional advanced practice nursing competencies such as ethical decision-making, legal and professional practice issues, translating research evidence into evidence-based practice, and counseling patients around complex decisions. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the final year.  2 Course cr
W 1pm-2:50pm

NURS 7290a, Women’s Health V Clinical PracticeStaff

This course provides clinical experience and clinical competency building in antepartum and gynecologic care. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the final year.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7300a, Childbearing Care IIIErin McMahon

This course focuses on advanced theoretical concepts and comprehensive management of the pregnant woman with at-risk pregnancies or comorbid health problems. Recognition of newborn health problems and initial management are explored. Complex health issues are analyzed through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, assignments, and problem-based learning case studies. Management includes triage, prenatal, birth, and postpartum emergencies; and perinatal loss. Emphasis is on collaboration within multidisciplinary teams. Required of all nurse-midwifery students in the final year.  2 Course cr
W 5:30pm-7:20pm

NURS 7310a, Childbearing Care III Clinical PracticeStaff

Students focus on providing increasingly complex intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care as members of a multidisciplinary team in diverse settings. Students have twelve hours of clinical practice per week for twelve weeks and attend clinical conference for one hour per week. The clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of all midwifery students in the final year. Prerequisite: students must be certified in neonatal resuscitation through the American Academy of Pediatrics course.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7312b, Global Midwifery: UgandaMichelle Telfer

This seminar course is a precursor to the Summer Global Midwifery Clinical: Uganda (NURS 7314). It is an introduction to maternal and newborn global health issues including understanding the global burden of disease and morbidity and mortality affecting women and newborns. Building on NURS 72007240, 7235, 7260, and 7270, the seminar develops the student’s capacity to provide full-scope midwifery care for women and neonates in a low-resource setting. Introduction to country-specific prevalent tropical diseases and infections is covered, including their identification, treatment, and complications in pregnancy and childbirth. Historical, sociopolitical, economic, and cultural context is covered. Predeparture preparation with respect to personal health, travel safety, and anticipated ethical challenges is included. The Acholi language is  introduced, and students are expected to master some basic phrases. Course meets one hour weekly.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7320b, Integration of Midwifery CareStaff

This course is designed to help students assimilate all areas of midwifery practice. It integrates student provision of full-scope care with appropriate clinical supervision, academic support, and clinical support including site preceptors, faculty, school, and library resources. Students continue to refine their ability to provide high-quality, evidence-based, and culturally sensitive care that is safe and professionally accountable. Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills they have gained in their previous courses at YSN. Required of all nurse-midwifery students in the final year. For nurse-midwifery and nurse-midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students, this course must be taken concurrently with NURS 7330, and students must successfully complete all requirements of both courses in order to graduate. Prerequisites: all YSN core courses and all nurse-midwifery core courses.  6 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7330b, Integration of Women’s Health CareStaff

This course concentrates on the application of physiologic, developmental, psychosocial, and cultural theories to advanced clinical decision-making, focusing on reproductive and developmental health issues for women from adolescence to senescence. Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. For nurse-midwifery and nurse-midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students, this course must be taken concurrently with NURS 7320, and students must successfully complete all requirements of both courses in order to graduate. Prerequisite: successful completion of all courses required for the first, second, and third terms of the specialty.  6 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7335a or b, Women’s Health Primary Care ClinicalMonica Philipp

Women’s health nurse practitioner students are provided with supervised introductory clinical experience in adult primary care including the care of male patients. The emphasis of this clinical experience is on managing health promotion and common acute and chronic health problems. Students learn appropriate recognition, management, and referral of common medical conditions as they present in the outpatient setting. Examples of common health problems are: chronic and acute skin conditions, upper respiratory infections, asthma, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, thyroid, diabetes, headaches, and mood disorders. Additionally, students incorporate the primary care foundations of health promotion, risk assessment, disease prevention, and counseling. Required of all women’s health nurse practitioner students. The course may be completed in any term of the year depending on clinical site availability.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7340b, Midwifery and Women’s Health PharmacologyLoren Fields

The clinical pharmacology course is designed to prepare midwifery and women’s health students to clinically apply principles of pharmacotherapeutics in the management of women’s health needs. Through a series of selected case studies and online and class discussion, students learn to identify the correct pharmaceutical agent(s) for therapy and to develop plans to monitor the results for effectiveness and safety in a variety of clinical settings. Students are expected to utilize multiple methods for obtaining pharmacological information (e.g., Internet, library, and consultation of pharmacist). Required of all nurse-midwifery and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Taken concurrently with NURS 6020.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7400a, Advanced Pediatric Health Assessment and Clinical ReasoningNancy Banasiak and Monica Ordway

This course is designed to enhance the student’s pediatric health assessment skills and to introduce the student to the primary care of children from infancy through adolescence. Key aspects of assessment, health promotion, and disease prevention in culturally diverse pediatric populations are discussed. Clinical applications of evidence-based practice guidelines in the care of children are reinforced through laboratory and simulation experiences, as well as through rotations in hospital newborn care settings. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  2 Course cr
T 1pm-3pm

NURS 7410a, Individual and Family Development during ChildhoodMonica Ordway

This course focuses on a critical overview of conceptual and theoretical perspectives on individual development from infancy through adolescence and family development. Sociocultural, ethnic, gender, environmental, and political factors that influence individual and family development are reviewed and evaluated. Discussions focus on transitions from infancy to adolescence. Assessment of family functioning, strengths, and vulnerabilities is presented from clinical and research perspectives. Selected family issues are analyzed within theoretical, clinical, and policy perspectives, and issues of particular significance for evidence-based advanced nursing are stressed. This course is offered in weeks 1–8 of the fall term and is required of all family and pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Open to other students with permission of the instructor.  1½ Course cr
T 10:30am-12pm

NURS 7420a, Primary Care of Children I: Health PromotionStaff

This course is designed to introduce the student to the primary care of children from infancy through adolescence. Key aspects of health promotion and disease prevention in culturally diverse pediatric populations are discussed within the context of the national health agenda. Health risks and behaviors are explored to determine culturally sensitive interventions. Clinical applications of concepts, theories, current health policies, and evidence-based best-practice guidelines related to well-child care are presented. Required of all family and pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Open to others with permission of the instructor.  2 Course cr
T 8:30am-10:20am

NURS 7430a, Primary Care of Children I Clinical PracticeElyse Borsuk

This course provides clinical experience in well-child care and management of common pediatric problems in a variety of primary care settings. Students provide primary health care, acute care, and beginning case management for pediatric patients in the context of their families. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Four and one-half hours per week in a clinical setting and two hours of clinical conference per week.  2 Course cr
M 10am-11:50am

NURS 7440a, Primary Care of AdolescentsAlison Moriarty Daley

This course is designed to provide the student with a conceptual model for assessing normal psychological and physiological adolescent development, an understanding of the clinical relevance of basic deviations from normal development, and an understanding of the diagnosis and clinical care of adolescents in primary care settings. Required of all adult/gerontology primary care, family, and pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Open to others with permission of the instructor. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

NURS 7450a or b, Primary Care of Adolescents ClinicalAlison Moriarty Daley

This course is designed to aid the student in gaining elementary skills in the assessment of adolescent development, both physiological and psychological; in the recognition and management of deviations from normal development and health status; and in intermediate-level skill in the care of adolescents, including health education. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the second term of the first year of specialization or the first term of the final year. Six hours weekly in a clinical setting and six hours of clinical conference.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7460b, Primary Care of Children IINancy Banasiak

This course is designed to focus on the assessment, diagnosis, evidence-based management, and best-practice guidelines for care of children from birth through adolescence for common pediatric health problems. Required of all family and pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Open to others with permission of the instructor.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7470b, Primary Care of Children II Clinical PracticeElyse Borsuk

This course provides clinical experience in well-child care and management of common pediatric problems in a variety of primary care settings. Students provide primary health care, acute care, and beginning case management for pediatric patients in the context of their families. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Four and one-half hours per week in a clinical setting and two hours of clinical conference per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7480a, Primary Care of Children IIIPatricia Ryan-Krause

This course provides a forum for discussion of a variety of pediatric conditions encountered in the primary care setting. It focuses on the assessment and management of complex outpatient pediatric problems and the role of the advanced practice nurse in managing these problems. Lectures, discussions, and cases are presented by guest speakers, faculty, and students. Required of all family and pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year. Prerequisite: NURS 7460.  2 Course cr
M 8:30am-10:20am

NURS 7490a, Primary Care of Children III Clinical PracticeNancy Banasiak

This course provides clinical experience in advanced pediatric primary care and management, including work with complex families. The student provides health care for children over the course of the year in the Primary Care Center, Yale New Haven Hospital, and at selected pediatric primary care sites in the community. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year. Five hours weekly in a clinical setting, eight hours per term of observation, and fifteen hours of clinical conference. Prerequisite: NURS 7470.  2 Course cr
M 11am-1pm

NURS 7500b, Primary Care of Children IVPatricia Ryan-Krause

This course provides a forum for the discussion of a variety of pediatric conditions encountered in the primary care setting. It focuses on the assessment and management of complex outpatient pediatric problems and the role of the advanced practice nurse in managing these problems. Lectures, discussions, and cases are presented by faculty and guest lecturers. Required of all family and pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7510b, Primary Care of Children IV Clinical PracticeNancy Banasiak

This course provides clinical experience in advanced pediatric primary care and management, including work with complex families. The student provides health care for children over the course of the year in the Primary Care Center, Yale New Haven Hospital, and at selected pediatric primary care sites in the community. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year. Five hours weekly in a clinical setting and twelve hours of clinical conference. Prerequisite: NURS 7470.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7520b, Chronic Health Conditions in Children and AdolescentsElizabeth Doyle

This course focuses on the pathophysiology and advanced nursing management of chronic health conditions in children and adolescents across settings. Utilizing a systems approach, pathophysiology is reviewed, and then prototype chronic conditions and related evidence-based interventions as well as specialty and primary care management are discussed. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7530a or b, School Health Clinical PracticeNancy Banasiak

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to develop an advanced practice nursing role in the school setting. Experience is in a school-based clinic where the student provides primary and episodic care to the client population, participates in health education, as well as consults and collaborates with other health and education personnel in the school and community. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the second term of the first year of specialization or the first term of the final year. Six hours of clinical practice per week and six hours of clinical conference.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7540a and NURS 7541b, Specialty Pediatric Primary Care ClinicalMonica Ordway

This clinical practicum provides students with the opportunity to gain additional knowledge and experience in specialty practice areas with relevance to pediatric primary care. The course extends over the final academic year of specialization. Required of all pediatric primary care nurse practitioner students in the final year. Four and one-half hours of clinical practice for fifteen weeks, nine hours of clinical conference, and 13.5 hours of web-based clinical conference over the course of the academic year.  1 Course cr
M 2pm-4pm

NURS 7550b, Advanced Pediatric PharmacologyNicole Maciejak

This pharmacology course builds on general principles of pharmacology for advanced practice nurses and is designed to prepare students in the PNP specialties to apply principles of pharmacotherapeutics in the management of children’s and adolescents’ health. Students learn to identify the correct pharmaceutical agents for therapy and develop plans to monitor the results for effectiveness and safety in the pediatric primary care setting. Required of all pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Open to others with permission of the instructor. Two hours per week.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7600a, Mental Health Assessment across the LifespanSusan Boorin and Tina Walde

This course provides students with concepts, techniques, and knowledge necessary to conduct accurate mental health evaluations of persons across the lifespan. Students learn to collect data guided by the principles of general health screening, psychiatric history, mental status examination, and diagnostic criteria from the DSM-5, therapeutic interviewing, and comprehensive history taking. A bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual framework is used to formulate a case history, determine accurate differential diagnoses, and make a psychiatric diagnosis using the DSM-5 framework. Beginning development of treatment planning is also emphasized. Mental health assessment also emphasizes health risks within the psychiatric population, differentiation of physical conditions that may present as a primary psychiatric disorder, mental health promotion, and early case-finding to prevent mental illness. Other components of mental health assessment include the use of rating scales; evaluation of risk from dangerousness to self, others, or inability to care for self; the influence of family, sociocultural background, and developmental achievements; substance use and abuse; forensics; and trauma history. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week in class and 1.5 hours per week in clinical lab activities.  2½ Course cr
T 1pm-4:30pm

NURS 7610a, Psychopathology across the Lifespan ILindsay Powell and Dilice Robertson

This course examines the psychopathology and neurobiology of major psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. Essentials of neuroanatomy and neurobiology are examined as they relate to psychiatric symptoms. Disorders selected for examination are those most commonly seen in clinical settings in children, adolescents, adults, and older adults, including anxiety; depression; and behavioral, personality, and cognitive disorders (ADHD, Alzheimer’s). The public health importance, epidemiology, risk factors, and neuroscience are reviewed. The examination integrates genetic and environmental influences to support an understanding of the interpersonal, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes that define and underlie major mental illnesses. Evidence-based treatments are discussed in relationship to their impact on behavior, symptoms, neurobiology, and family systems. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
T 9:30am-11:30am

NURS 7620b, Psychopathology across the Lifespan IILindsay Powell and Susan Boorin

This course examines the psychopathology and neurobiology of major psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. Essentials of neuroanatomy and neurobiology are examined as they relate to psychiatric symptoms. Disorders selected for examination are those most commonly seen in clinical settings in children, adolescents, adults, and older adults, including anxiety; depression; and behavioral, personality, and cognitive disorders (ADHD, Alzheimer’s). The public health importance, epidemiology, risk factors, and neuroscience are reviewed. The examination integrates genetic and environmental influences to support an understanding of the interpersonal, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes that define and underlie major mental illnesses. Evidence-based treatments are discussed in relationship to their impact on behavior, symptoms, neurobiology, and family systems. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7630a and NURS 7631b, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan I and IIStaff

The goal of this two-term practicum is to provide the student with an opportunity to develop clinical skills with individuals and family across the lifespan. While in psychiatric clinical settings, students apply skills including holistic physical and mental health assessment, formulate differential diagnosis, plan and implement developmentally appropriate psychiatric nursing interventions, and evaluate interventions and outcomes with children, adolescents, adults, older adults, and their families. Emphasis is placed on application of a variety of population-specific assessment skills and use of differential diagnosis, and a beginning utilization of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment methods with individuals, groups, and families. Clinical experiences require the student to synthesize knowledge from courses, supplemental readings, clinical seminars, and practice experiences. Students are assigned to psychiatric clinical placement on the basis of development of competencies, previous clinical experiences, and interests. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. This course may be taken concurrently with didactic first-year PMH specialty course work. Primary placement supervision seminar meets two hours per week. Outplacement supervision seminar meets one hour per week.  4 Course cr per term
HTBA

NURS 7650a, Individual Psychotherapy IAndree de Lisser and Tina Walde

This course provides an overview of the major schools of personality theory and psychological development, and the individual psychotherapy treatment modalities that were developed from them. Students deepen and expand their knowledge of fundamental elements in developing and maintaining the therapeutic relationship with clients in mental health settings. The student conceptualizes personality characteristics, behavior, and defensive structure in order to better understand the dynamics of the patient and the therapeutic relationship. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. One hour per week.  1 Course cr
T 4:30pm-5:30pm

NURS 7660b, Individual Psychotherapy IIAndree de Lisser and Tina Walde

This course provides an overview of the major schools of personality theory and psychological development and the individual psychotherapy treatment modalities that were developed from them. Students integrate the concepts learned in NURS 7650 with particular schools of theory and practice. A comparison of psychotherapeutic treatment modalities assists the student in beginning to identify and utilize select interventions specifically suited to individual patient problems identified in advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. One hour per week.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7670b, Clinical Psychopharmacology across the LifespanSusan Boorin and Lindsay Powell

This course covers the principles of psychiatric pharmacotherapy across the lifespan and the role of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse prescriber. It focuses on biological mechanisms of action of psychotropic drugs; common side effects and adverse reactions; safety issues in prescribing psychotropic medications; and alterations needed in using these agents in specialty populations. The neurobiological components important in understanding symptom etiology and treatment are incorporated to select the most efficacious pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric disorders. Pharmacological history, differential diagnoses, and symptoms targeted for pharmacological activity are incorporated as integral components of prescriptive practice. An emphasis on clinical decision-making includes all phases of pharmacologic treatment: evaluation and diagnosis; initiation of treatment; determining efficacy; evaluating side effects; enhancing patient adherence; evaluation of response; long-term maintenance vs. discontinuation; patient education; and integration of psychotherapy. Sources of information include evidence-based data, treatment algorithms, established practice guidelines, textbooks, journal articles, and current conference proceedings. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7680a, Clinical Outcome Management in Psychiatric–Mental Health NursingJoanne Iennaco and Tina Walde

The provision of mental health services is determined by many factors including policy, public demand, research evidence, ideas among general practitioners and mental health professionals, and the financial pressures under which purchasers and providers of services work. These groups often have widely disparate views about the nature of mental disorders and their most appropriate interventions. In providing services to individuals, families, groups, systems, and organizations, the advanced practice psychiatric nurse functions as clinician, consultant, leader, educator, and researcher in the analysis of critical issues important to decision-making and intervention. The assumption underlying the course is that all advanced practice mental health services should be fundamentally theoretical and evidence-based. In this course students define clinical problems and system implications, use technology to identify clinical and research evidence, and critically analyze the evidence. Based on this analysis they devise and present realistic plans for intervention in the clinical setting and write an evidence-based review paper summarizing the results. Discussion about what constitutes the best available evidence to clarify decision-making with regard to a variety of mental health and health promotion needs is addressed. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
M 1:30pm-2:50pm

NURS 7690a, Group PsychotherapyAndree de Lisser and Dilice Robertson

This course examines methods and major conceptual frameworks of group psychotherapy, especially Yalom’s group therapy model. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to the clinical realities of groups encountered in various inpatient and outpatient settings. This course examines various group treatment modalities and how they are useful in different psychiatric disorders and settings. The course demonstrates how group treatment choices are made through patient assessment; diagnosis; and cognitive, cultural, individual, and pharmacological considerations. Knowledge of group dynamics and systems theory is reviewed through the current literature and research. The lab portion of this course offers the opportunity for students to have a task group experience and examine group norms, process, communication patterns, roles, subgroups, stages of group development, and styles of leadership. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the final year. One hour per week in class and 1.5 hours per week in clinical lab activities.  1½ Course cr
M 10am-12:20pm

NURS 7700a, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan IIIStaff

The aim of the fall-term, second-year clinical practicum is to promote development of clinical and leadership skills required for advanced professional practice across the lifespan in psychiatric–mental health nursing. Building on first-year clinical skills, students are expected to choose, implement, and evaluate advanced assessment and differential diagnostic reasoning skills, psychotherapeutic (e.g., group, individual, family) techniques, and psychopharmacological interventions with children, adolescents, adults, older adults, and their families in a variety of psychiatric clinical settings. Ethnic, gender, and developmentally appropriate therapeutic, educational, and supportive intervention strategies are implemented for patients across the lifespan. Students are expected to collaborate with other health care providers in the care of their patients. Health promotion and disease prevention strategies are examined and prioritized in relation to promoting mental and physical health with ethnically diverse individuals, groups, and families. Role delineation, ethical and legal responsibilities, and clinical expectations related to prescriptive authority, evidence-based decision-making, anticipatory guidance, and therapeutic psychiatric–mental health nursing care are explored. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Clinical supervision seminar meetings two hours per week. Prerequisites: first-year clinical and didactic requirements.  6 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7710b, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan IVStaff

The aim of this final-term, second-year clinical practicum is to provide a clinical immersion experience with a specific patient population. Building on and enhancing the competencies of NURS 7700, the emphasis of the course is on the integration and application of leadership, ethics, patient safety, quality improvement, systems, and care delivery principles in advanced practice psychiatric–mental health nursing. This course builds on the knowledge and competencies acquired throughout the program of study and the required clinical practica. Students gain increased competency and demonstrate increased accountability in the provision of comprehensive psychiatric–mental health care in the designated clinical site(s). Students expand practice experiences to include leadership and indirect clinical activities (e.g., consultation, supervision, or education; understanding of organizational systems and structures, policy and systems issues, and the professional advanced practice nursing role; collaboration and leadership) within their practice sites. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Clinical supervision seminar meets two hours per week. Prerequisites: first-year clinical and didactic requirements.  6 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7720b, Applied Psychopharmacology across the LifespanLindsay Powell and Susan Boorin

This elective course builds on NURS 7670 and is designed to facilitate student expertise and confidence in prescribing the major categories of psychiatric medications to patients across the lifespan. The course is divided into eight major topic areas: antipsychotic, antidepressant, anti-anxiety, mood-stabilizing, hypnotic, stimulant, cognitive enhancement, and substance use treatment medications used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. The concepts of sleep disruption, personality function, and pain management are integrated into each topic area. Each topic area includes two class sessions. The first reviews the biological mechanisms of action, common adverse events, drug-drug and drug-nutrient interactions, safety issues, and monitoring implications of the psychopharmacology category. The second is case-based, using real-life, interactive, web-based cases for group problem solving and consensus building regarding the most appropriate psychopharmacological course of treatment incorporating legal-ethical and bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual components of care. Upon completion, students will be prepared to complete Phase 1 of the Neuroscience Education Institute’s Master Psychopharmacology Program. Suggested for psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Two hours per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7730b, Family PsychotherapyAndree de Lisser

This course provides an overview and critical analysis of family theories and conceptual models. The course examines the applicability of these models to guide advanced family psychiatric–mental health practice with children, adolescents, adults, and their families. The strengths and limitations of such models as Bowenian, cognitive-behavioral, structural, and problem-solving are compared and contrasted in relation to their potential to guide psychotherapy with children, adolescents, adults, and their families. The course also examines how the selected family theories and conceptual models take into account and address the influence of cultural, social, and ethical issues, and of mental and physical health status, on the family systems over time. A lab component assists students in applying family theories and models to guide their assessment, treatment, and evaluation of family therapy with ethnically diverse families in a variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the final year. One hour per week in class and 1.5 hours per week in clinical lab activities.  1½ Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7800a, Advanced Health Assessment in Adult/Gerontology Acute CareStaff

This course concentrates on development of a systematic methodology of identifying acutely and critically ill patients’ needs for health care. Patient history taking, physical examination, diagnostic studies and interpretation, interpretation of advanced hemodynamic and oxygenation monitoring, analysis of medical diagnoses, documentation, and student case presentations form the basis for this clinical/seminar course. Select clinical problems of patients in acute and critical care adult/gerontology settings are studied in the context of student case presentations, clinical practicum, and simulations. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Prerequisites: NURS 5040 and NURS 5041; or NURS 6000.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7810a, Advanced Diagnostics in Acute CareAllison Cable

This course provides comprehensive content necessary in the assessment of the acutely or critically ill patient. Emphasis is on examination of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, based on complex interpretations from laboratory and technological findings. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. The electrocardiographic (ECG) components of the course may be taken as an elective by students in any specialty who have an interest in ECG interpretation. Three hours per week for fifteen weeks.  3 Course cr
T 11am-12:50pm

NURS 7820a, Critical Care Clinical ImmersionStaff

The focus of this practicum is comprehensive management of a caseload of patients with adult/gerontology acute care chronic and/or acute complex conditions. Emphasis is on prediction of common patient problems, formulation of management protocols, and generation of research questions. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization; students may request to exempt out as determined by faculty review of a clinical portfolio and competency.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7830b, Pathophysiology and Management of Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Health Problems IMary-Ann Cyr

This course provides a basis for predicting the vulnerability for common cardiovascular, respiratory, hematologic, renal, and neurological clinical problems that occur as a result of illness or outcome of treatment in adult and geriatric patients. Assessment, management, and evaluation are emphasized. Normal physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological management of these conditions are included. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization.  4 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7840b, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice IStaff

This practicum and seminar in the care of acutely, critically, and complex chronically ill adult and geriatric patients provides students with direct care experiences. The focus is on assessment and management. Critical thinking, clinical analysis of patient data, formulation of differential diagnoses, and planning of care are emphasized. Clinical seminars focus on case presentation by students. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Eight hours of clinical practice plus one hour of seminar per week. Prerequisites: NURS 5040 and NURS 5041, or NURS 6000; and NURS 7800 and NURS 7810.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7850a, Pathophysiology and Management of Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Health Problems IIMary-Ann Cyr

This course provides a basis for predicting the vulnerability for common clinical problems in acute care patients. These include trauma and endocrine, hepatic, gastrointestinal, infection/sepsis, and end-of-life problems that occur as a result of illness or outcome of treatment. Assessment, management, and evaluation are emphasized. Normal physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological management of these systems are included. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the final year. Prerequisites: NURS 5040 and NURS 5041, or NURS 6000; and NURS 7800, NURS 7810, and NURS 7830.  4 Course cr
Th 8:30am-12:20pm

NURS 7860a, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice IIStaff

The first term of a yearlong (with NURS 7870) practicum that provides students with clinical experience in data-gathering techniques, diagnostic reasoning, management of acute and chronic health problems, application of technology in patient care, consultation, collaboration, health promotion, and risk factor modification. This course builds upon the foundational objectives successfully met in NURS 7840. The differential diagnosis and treatment of complex health problems commonly seen in acutely ill adult/gerontology patients are stressed, with special emphasis on conditions presented in NURS 7830 and NURS 7850. The focus is on those acute illnesses with a predictable course and established treatment approaches. Students have the opportunity to manage a caseload of patients from admission through discharge, as well as follow patients on an outpatient basis. A two-hour weekly clinical conference addresses acute care clinical issues and includes simulation activities. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the final year. Preceptors are APRNs, PAs, and physicians. Twenty-four hours per week in an acute care setting for fifteen weeks.  8.3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7870b, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice IIILaura Andrews

The second term of a yearlong (with NURS 7860) practicum that provides students with clinical experience in data-gathering techniques, diagnostic reasoning, management of acute and chronic health problems, application of technology in patient care, consultation, collaboration, health promotion, and risk factor modification. This course builds upon the foundational objectives successfully met in NURS 7840. The differential diagnosis and treatment of complex health problems commonly seen in acutely ill adult/gerontology patients are stressed, with special emphasis on conditions presented in NURS 7830 and NURS 7850. The focus is on those acute illnesses with a predictable course and established treatment approaches. Students have the opportunity to manage a caseload of patients from admission through discharge, as well as follow patients on an outpatient basis. A two-hour weekly clinical conference addresses acute care clinical issues. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the final year. Preceptors are APRNs and physicians. Twenty-four hours per week in an acute care setting for fifteen weeks.  8.3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 7880b, Advanced Acute Care PharmacologyAllison Cable

This course is designed to prepare students to clinically apply pharmacotherapeutics from an advanced practice approach. Students learn to identify the correct pharmaceutical agents for therapy and to develop plans to monitor the results for effectiveness and safety in a variety of advanced practice nursing clinical settings. Students learn multiple methods for obtaining pharmacological information requisite to safely prescribe and monitor effects of their pharmacological selections. Required of all adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Taken concurrently with NURS 6020. The hours per week are determined by the specialty.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9510b, Clinical D.N.P. Practicum IJoan Combellick

This course is the first in a series of four clinical D.N.P. practica in which students gain health care agency experience in preparing for, developing, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating their D.N.P. projects. In this first practicum course, students begin to engage and work with experts in the health care systems and agencies where they will conduct their projects. This practicum prepares D.N.P. students for the systems interactions involved in planning and executing clinical projects. The expected outcomes are a written agreement with the agency for D.N.P. project implementation, engagement and planning activities with agency personnel involved in requisite protocols for project implementation, and development of a relationship with an external mentor/expert. The student develops a preliminary outline of systems activities and protocols to be followed in this preparation phase of the project and obtains the signed agreement of an outside mentor. The student keeps weekly logs of activities, which are submitted to, reviewed by, and discussed with course faculty. 67.5 hours.  1½ Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9570a, Evidence for Doctor of Nursing PracticeSamantha Conley and Maggie Holland

This course reviews research methods and statistics and explores the nature of evidence as it relates to the discipline of nursing. Literature and evidence within and outside of nursing are critically appraised for translation to and evaluation of practice. Students are expected to select a phenomenon of interest and to critically review and synthesize evidence from diverse sources (literature, research, and population-based health data) to address the phenomenon. Required of all D.N.P. students in the first year.  3 Course cr
ThF 11am-12pm, ThF 1pm-4:30pm

NURS 9630a or b, Moving Health Care Forward: Innovation and ImplementationStaff

This course focuses on theories and methods of innovation in health care as well as models of change and implementation. Includes a review of the principles of transformational leadership as they relate to thought leadership and practice in health care. Students explore innovation and implementation science and practice from the organizational systems perspective, informed by the current and relevant literature.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9670b, Quality and Safety in Health Care OrganizationsLisa Corbett

This course provides an overview of theoretical principles and concepts essential to assessing, designing, implementing, and evaluating population-based health projects within and across the health system and other organizations. In this course, students critically examine change, decision-making, evaluation, and management-related theories as a foundation for project planning, implementation, and evaluation of an evidence-based improvement project. Students identify and develop a theory-based project derived from an integrated synthesis of the literature. Students also identify appropriate software, tools, and communication techniques essential for leading an interprofessional team from inception to completion of the project within and across health care systems or other organizations. The tools and processes learned in this course will support work toward the subsequent D.N.P. final project. Required of all D.N.P. students in the first year.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9680a, Clinical D.N.P. Scholarly Project DevelopmentJoanne Iennaco

This seminar for the Clinical D.N.P. student supports the initial development of the D.N.P. proposal. Topics discussed in the seminar include: the structure and process of clinical knowledge development and translation; assessing existing evidence in relationship to current clinical practices and processes of change; identification of factors to ensure effective clinical implementation; and approaches to clinical scholarship development, including communication and expression. Seminar outcomes include an individualized Clinical Area of Inquiry and a Project Proposal identifying the focus and site for the D.N.P. project. Meets 15 hours per term both in person and online.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9710b, Health Care Policy, Politics, and ProcessLisa Summers

This course provides an overview of past and current health policy literature and research. It also provides the student with the opportunity to critically analyze basic concepts, principles, and consequences of policy options for achieving selected health services goals across the spectrum of health and health care systems. It is built upon the understanding that health care delivery is the transformation of health science into health service. Students increase their aptitude in the three P’s—policy, politics, and process—in order to shape health care delivery changes. Policy, politics, and process occur in organizational, state, tribal, and federal spaces. In this era of sweeping health reform, it is imperative that students understand the players, the interactions, and the routes to change. The class discusses contemporary policy changes and debates. Students examine a policy relevant to their own work. Required of all D.N.P. students in the second year. This is a hybrid course, taken concurrently with NURS 9720.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9720b, Health Care Policy, Politics, and Process PracticumLisa Summers

Taken concurrently with NURS 9710, this practicum offers the student a faculty-mentored clinical experience that is designed to enable the student to translate evidence-based principles of health policy content into best practices with diverse populations outside, within, and/or across a variety of local, national, and/or international health care systems or organizations. The student is expected to maintain a log of committed time dedicated to the selected practicum. Forty-five hours total, averaging three hours per week. Students are to maintain their clinical practicum hours in e-portfolio. Required of all D.N.P. students in the second year.  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9770b, The Business of Health CareMary Ann Camilleri

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles of economics, finance, and business operations within the context of the health care system and organizations. Essential economic and financial theory for the health care decision maker is examined within institutional, local, and national environments. Principles and theories of finance methodology are an intricate part of the discussions related to public and private financing within and across health care delivery systems. The relationships among health care systems, financial decision-making, and current and emerging electronic clinical database systems are examined. Required of all D.N.P. students in the second year.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9810a, Leadership DevelopmentMary Ann Camilleri

In this course, students analyze and apply principles of contemporary leadership and administration. Students develop self-awareness of their leadership abilities and develop a plan to enhance areas for development. Building on previous courses in the D.N.P. program, especially regarding ethics, evidence for practice, and business applications, students analyze case studies in nursing leadership and suggest the best courses of action. The emphasis is on strategic thinking and quality improvement in health care delivery, policy, and regulatory environments. Students are expected to critically examine and integrate selected leadership styles and apply differing approaches to different situations. In the companion practicum (NURS 9820), students are expected to apply the principles learned in a mentored leadership experience in a health care delivery organization or other organizations (e.g., community-based health centers), nursing education, regulatory, or policy setting environments. Required of all D.N.P. students in the second year.  3 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9820a, Leadership Development PracticumMary Ann Camilleri

Students participate in a mentored leadership initiative in a clinical, educational, or regulatory environment or with local and national policy makers. The expected outcome is a final scholarly paper that applies and evaluates their evidence-based leadership model and related strategies to an agreed upon leadership initiative. The students, in collaboration with their assigned mentor(s), identify the change initiative and develop a timeline for the negotiated deliverables. Required of all D.N.P. students in the second year. A total of forty-five clinical hours is required, and the students are expected to negotiate with their assigned mentor how these hours will be scheduled. Students are expected to keep a reflective log of their activities in e-portfolio, labeled as “practica.”  1 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9890b, D.N.P. Project: Part 1Staff

This course is designed to help students integrate D.N.P. course content and practica into their project proposal. Common conceptual framework and models of care are presented. Methods for developing and evaluating D.N.P. projects are discussed. Strategies to establish project working relationships are explored. During this course, draft proposals are reviewed using the Guidelines for Developing and Implementing a D.N.P. Project, with the addition of rubrics for evaluation of the work. Students present their proposal for critique by their project adviser and faculty of record in order to finalize their proposal for presentation and approval. Required of all D.N.P. students in the first year.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9900a, D.N.P. Project: Part 2Jane Dixon and Joan Kearney

This course is designed to assist students as they integrate D.N.P. course content and clinical practica into a final D.N.P. project proposal. Students are expected to work in concert with their assigned D.N.P. project adviser during the spring term of their second year on the development of their final proposal. Draft proposals are reviewed using the Guidelines for Developing and Implementing a D.N.P. Project, with the addition of rubrics for evaluation of the work. The student is expected to present the proposal for critique by peers, project adviser, and course instructor. Required of all D.N.P. students in the second year. Three hours per week.  2 Course cr
HTBA

NURS 9980a and NURS 9981b, Leadership Immersion PracticumJessica Coviello

The Leadership Immersion is a yearlong, mentored experience in which students apply relevant knowledge to an evidence-based experience culminating in a final D.N.P. project in NURS 9990/NURS 9991. Students employ effective communication and collaboration skills to influence improved health care quality and safety and to negotiate successful changes in care delivery processes within and/or across health and health care systems and organizations. Students complete the immersion under guidance of the site mentor, who will be a member of the nursing faculty D.N.P. project adviser/committee under the leadership of the D.N.P. project chair and the D.N.P. director. Required of all D.N.P. students in the final year. 225 practicum hours. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required theoretical and D.N.P. project courses as well as an approved D.N.P. project proposal.  2½ Course cr per term
HTBA

NURS 9990a and NURS 9991b, D.N.P. Project: Evidence-Based Practice ChangeJessica Coviello

Students apply relevant knowledge to an evidence-based, yearlong experience culminating in a final D.N.P. project manuscript, which will be submitted for publication. The D.N.P. project includes critical review and integration of relevant literature/research that provides support of the identified population-based health issue or problem, as well as at least one policy and/or evidence-based strategy that has the potential to address that health issue or problem. Required of all D.N.P. students in the final year.  2½ Course cr per term
HTBA