Curriculum

The master’s curriculum is organized by specialty. The first year of the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing is described separately.

All course descriptions are listed in numerical order in the chapter Courses. Courses designated “a” meet in the fall term. Courses designated “b” meet in the spring term. Courses designated “a” and “b” are yearlong courses. Courses designated “c” meet in the summer. Bracketed courses are not offered in the current academic year. The a/b/c course designations appear in the YSN bulletin only. 

Required courses for each specialty are listed in the description of each specialty. The listings describe schedules for full-time study. The course plan for scheduled part-time study may be found online or obtained from the YSN registrar and specialty directors. The School reserves the right to offer course substitutions and to amend the overall curriculum.

Elective courses: Students may elect School of Nursing courses offered by specialties other than the one in which they are enrolled or by other schools or departments within Yale University, with the permission of the course instructor and their specialty director. The School of Nursing also offers electives and concentrations. More information can be found in the chapter Courses and in the sections on concentrations, below.

Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing

The Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) is a one-year, full-time course of study focused on preparation in evidence-based nursing, followed by two years of advanced practice specialty study. The first year of the program is designed to provide a solid foundation in nursing theory, nursing process, biological science, health assessment, and pharmacology. This content is integrated into the clinical experiences in medical-surgical, pediatric, psychiatric–mental health, maternal-newborn, and community health nursing and interprofessional collaboration in practice. The prespecialty year is completed full-time over the course of the fall, spring, and summer terms.

Upon completion of the prespecialty year, the student continues in the master’s specialty that was designated when accepted into the GEPN program. At this point, changes in specialty are not allowed.

The Certificate in Nursing is awarded upon successful completion of all required GEPN courses. The Certificate in Nursing satisfies Connecticut General Statutes requirements, allowing the student to become eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Students are required to pass the NCLEX-RN and submit proof of their Connecticut RN licensure by the last day of classes of the first term of their specialty program of study. The Certificate in Nursing and a license to practice nursing in Connecticut are two prerequisites for enrollment in the second term of the first specialty year.

Graduate Entry Prespecialty Year

Fall Term
Issues in Nursing
Biomedical Foundations of Health and Disease
Advanced Health Assessment
Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience
Introduction to Drug Therapy
Clinical Applications of Human Anatomy
Clinical Practice in Medical-Surgical Nursing
Medical-Surgical Nursing
Spring Term
Biomedical Foundations of Health and Disease
Advanced Health Assessment
Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience
Clinical Practice in Maternal-Newborn Nursing 1
Maternal-Newborn Nursing 1
Medical-Surgical Nursing
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Nursing 1
Pediatric Nursing 1
Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing
Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing
Summer Term
Community Health Nursing and Public Health
Clinical Practice in Maternal-Newborn Nursing 1
Maternal-Newborn Nursing 1
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Nursing 1
Pediatric Nursing 1

Master in Nursing Specialties

The master’s program is designed to prepare advanced practice nurses to provide high-quality evidence-based care, to engage in scholarly inquiry, and to be leaders in the profession. The first year includes assessment of clinical skill development, foundational knowledge in pathophysiology of common diseases, and principles of evidence-based practice. The final year provides advanced clinical management skills, role development, integration of practice and policy theory, and leadership. Students are expected to remain in the specialty to which they were accepted.

The specialties offered in the master’s program are (1) Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner; (2) Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner; (3) Family Nurse Practitioner; (4) Midwifery and/or Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner; (5) Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Primary Care; (6) Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Acute Care; and (7) Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. Each student is assigned a faculty adviser who is a clinical expert in the student’s chosen field of specialization. Within the specialty area, emphasis is placed upon the development of clinical judgment. In addition to clinical experience, conferences with individual faculty advisers, group conferences with specialty faculty members, and courses presenting scientific data and content relevant to the specialty area provide opportunity for in-depth study. In their final year, students may also have an opportunity to pursue clinical concentrations in the areas of diabetes, oncology, and gender and sexuality health justice. Students will be required to have access to transportation for their clinical site placements, including sites away from the State of Connecticut.

The following is a list of core courses for all specialties of the master’s program. In addition, each specialty requires specific didactic and clinical courses, which are listed in the plans of study for each specialty. Course descriptions can be found in the chapter Courses.

Core Courses

Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
Advanced Pathophysiology
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community

The required research methods and evidence-based practice course in the first year of specialization provides the foundation for evidence-based, patient-centered care.

The curriculum of specialties is intended to prepare students to apply for certification through credentialing agencies. Please note that there is no program in the nation that can meet each state’s individual certification requirements. The School recommends that students review all state requirements and consult their academic adviser to plan how they can meet those requirements while enrolled in the School.

Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AGACNP) specialty prepares acute care nurse practitioners to assess and manage collaboratively the needs of patients who are acutely and critically ill across the full continuum of adult acute care services. The core body of knowledge provided in the specialty is derived from the full spectrum of high-acuity patient care needs. The population focus is adult/gerontology. The AGACNP curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

In the first year of study, the focus is on history taking, physical assessment, differential diagnosis, diagnostic testing, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and management of patients. Courses in assessing the acutely ill individual, diagnostic reasoning, nursing theory, research, and statistics are also featured in the first year. Clinical conferences focus on the diagnosis and management of problems seen in acutely ill patients, as well as pharmacology.

During the final year of study, emphasis is placed on the differential diagnosis and management of complex problems seen in the acutely and critically ill patient population. Courses also include content on specialty pharmacology, health promotion, acute and chronic disease management, and the role of the nurse practitioner. Clinical placement sites expose the student to a variety of acute care settings and patient populations. Clinical conferences focus on the diagnosis and management of complex acute care problems.

AGACNP courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking an AGACNP specialty course must consult with the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Advanced Health Assessment in Adult/Gerontology Acute Care
Advanced Diagnostics in Acute Care
Critical Care Clinical Immersion
Spring Term
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Pathophysiology and Management of Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Health Problems I
Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice I
Advanced Acute Care Pharmacology

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Pathophysiology and Management of Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Health Problems II
Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice II
Spring Term
Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice III

Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGPCNP) specialty emphasizes primary care of the entire adult to older adult age spectrum from wellness to illness across a variety of health care settings. The population of AGPCNP practice includes young adults (late adolescents and emancipated minors), adults, and older adults. The AGPCNP curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

AGPCNP courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking an AGPCNP specialty course must consult with the specialty director.

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Specialty Health Assessment
Primary Care I A
Primary Care I B
Women’s Health I
Primary Care of Adolescents
Spring Term
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care II
Primary Care II Clinical Practice
Concepts and Principles of Aging
Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Pharmacology
Women’s Health III

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Mental Health Management for Advanced Practice Nurses
Primary Care III
Primary Care III Clinical Practice
Spring Term
Primary Care IV Clinical Practice
Advanced Primary Care of the Older Adult

Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) specialty emphasizes the primary care of newborns, infants, children, adolescents, adults, pregnant and postpartum women, and older adults within the context of family-centered care. The FNP curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Family Nurse Practitioner Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

FNP courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking an FNP specialty course must consult with the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Specialty Health Assessment
Primary Care I A
Primary Care I B
Women’s Health I
Individual and Family Development during Childhood
Primary Care of Children I: Health Promotion
Primary Care of Adolescents
Spring Term
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care II
Primary Care II Clinical Practice
Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Pharmacology
Women’s Health III
Primary Care of Children II

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Mental Health Management for Advanced Practice Nurses
Primary Care III
Primary Care III Clinical Practice
Primary Care of Children III
Spring Term
Primary Care IV Clinical Practice
Advanced Primary Care of the Older Adult
Primary Care of Children IV

Nurse-Midwifery Specialty

The Nurse-Midwifery (NM) specialty is designed to prepare clinically competent midwives who provide family-centered primary health care to women across the lifespan. Clinical experiences with individuals and groups, incorporated throughout the two years, emphasize use of the midwifery management process as a framework to provide health care. Relevant research and concepts from midwifery, nursing, medicine, and the sciences are studied to provide a base of theory and rationale for clinical practice and primary care. Students are expected to examine their midwifery and nursing practice critically and to develop beginning skills in the evaluation of research methods and statistics. Leadership capabilities are emphasized.

Courses and clinical work focus on the independent management of the health care needs of woman and newborns. These needs include primary care, pregnancy, birth, postpartum, family planning, and gynecological care across the lifespan. Students learn collaborative, interdisciplinary management of the care of women and newborns with health complications. Clinical practice takes place within health care systems that provide for medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral in accord with the Standards for the Practice of Midwifery promulgated by the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM). The curriculum meets the ACNM Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice. Elective and independent study courses offer opportunities for students to pursue individual educational and professional goals. Completion of the NM curriculum qualifies students for the national certification examination offered by the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB).

Nurse-Midwifery courses are only open to specialty students admitted to the Nurse-Midwifery (NM) specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking a Nurse-Midwifery specialty course must consult with the specialty director.

Students admitted to the NM specialty may choose to complete the master’s degree and pursue the Nurse-Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner dual specialty; or students may choose to pursue only the Nurse-Midwifery specialty or only the Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialty. If students choose to complete both specialties, they will incur additional tuition charges and may require additional time to complete the program based on clinical site placement availability (see the chapter Educational Expenses and Financial Aid).

The NM program of study is fully accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education (ACME), www.midwife.org/Accreditation; and by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation.

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Mental Health Management for Advanced Practice Nurses
Primary Care I A
Primary Care I B
Women’s Health I
Women’s Health II
Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice 1
Childbearing Care I
Spring and Summer Terms
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care II
Women’s Health III
Women’s Health IV
Women’s Health III and IV Clinical Practice (spring or summer) 1
Childbearing Care II
Childbearing Care II Clinical Practice (spring or summer) 1
Midwifery and Women’s Health Pharmacology

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Women’s Health V
Women’s Health V Clinical Practice 1
Childbearing Care III
Childbearing Care III Clinical Practice 1
Spring Term
Integration of Midwifery Care 1
Integration of Women’s Health Care 1

Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP) specialty prepares students for the role of a patient-centered primary health care provider who focuses on gender-related health care needs. WHNP students are prepared to care for women from adolescence through their later life, with expertise in gynecology, prenatal care, and primary care. They are also prepared to provide sexual and reproductive-related health care to men and patients across gender identities. Relevant research and concepts from nursing, midwifery, medicine, the sciences, and the humanities provide a base for classroom education and clinical practice. Clinical practice experiences take place across a variety of outpatient health care systems from community health centers to public and private women’s health and primary care offices.

WHNP courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking a WHNP specialty course must consult with the specialty director.

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Mental Health Management for Advanced Practice Nurses
Primary Care I A
Primary Care I B
Women’s Health I
Women’s Health II
Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice 1
Spring and Summer Terms
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care II
Women’s Health III
Women’s Health IV
Women’s Health III and IV Clinical Practice (spring or summer) 1
Women’s Health Primary Care Clinical 1
Midwifery and Women’s Health Pharmacology

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Women’s Health V
Women’s Health V Clinical Practice 1
Spring Term
Integration of Women’s Health Care 1

Nurse-Midwifery and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Dual Specialty

Students applying to YSN may pursue the NM program, the WHNP program, or the dual NM/WHNP program. WHNP students cannot make changes to their specialty selection once admitted into the program. Students admitted to the GEPN program as NM or dual NM/WHNP must declare their decision to pursue the dual NM/WHNP program prior to the start of the specialty years and are not permitted to join the dual program during their specialty years of study. Students who are accepted into the dual program will pay an additional tuition, split over four terms, beginning in the fall of the first specialty year (see the chapter Educational Expenses and Financial Aid). In addition, students will need to be enrolled in an extra term, usually but not always completed during the summer, in order to complete both specialties. Graduation in May of the second specialty year cannot be guaranteed. It will be influenced by the availability of clinical sites and student flexibility in clinical placements.

NM/WHNP courses are only open to students enrolled in the dual specialty program. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking an NM/WHNP specialty course must consult with the specialty director. 

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Mental Health Management for Advanced Practice Nurses
Primary Care I A
Primary Care I B
Women’s Health I
Women’s Health II
Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice 1
Childbearing Care I
Spring and Summer Terms
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care II
Women’s Health III
Women’s Health IV
Women’s Health III and IV Clinical Practice (spring or summer) 1
Childbearing Care II
Childbearing Care II Clinical Practice (spring or summer) 1
Women’s Health Primary Care Clinical 1
Midwifery and Women’s Health Pharmacology

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Women’s Health V
Women’s Health V Clinical Practice 1
Childbearing Care III
Childbearing Care III Clinical Practice 1
Spring Term
Integration of Midwifery Care 1
Integration of Women’s Health Care 1

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Acute Care Specialty

The Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Acute Care (PNP-AC) specialty prepares graduates for the advanced practice role of providing complex, comprehensive care to infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. With a foundation in primary care to more complex acute or chronic health conditions, there is an emphasis on integrating current evidence-based research, family-centered care, and cultural humility into clinical practice.

Each student, throughout the two years, provides acute, complex, and chronic illness health care for infants through adolescents in a variety of care settings, including pediatric intensive care units, inpatient settings, neonatal intensive care units, specialty clinics, and emergency departments. The PNP-AC curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Certification in acute care through the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board.

PNP-AC courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. This specialty is designed for entering R.N. students who hold a baccalaureate in any field and have one to two years of acute inpatient experience. The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Acute Care Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNS only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Advanced Pediatric Health Assessment and Clinical Reasoning
Individual and Family Development during Childhood
Primary Care of Children I: Health Promotion
Primary Care of Children I Clinical Practice
Primary Care of Adolescents
Advanced Acute and Critical Care Diagnostics for Pediatrics
Spring Term
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care of Children II
Chronic Health Conditions in Children and Adolescents
Advanced Pediatric Pharmacology
Specialty Pediatric Acute Care Clinical

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Acute Care of Children I
Acute Care of Children I Clinical
Spring Term
Acute Care of Children II
Acute Care of Children II Clinical

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Primary Care Specialty

The Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Primary Care (PNP-PC) specialty prepares graduates for expanded roles in the provision of primary care to children and adolescents. Courses focus on theories and clinical application related to health promotion, health and developmental assessment, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and management of common acute and chronic conditions in children and adolescents with a family-centered approach to care. There is an emphasis on the development of evidence-based research skills fundamental to advanced practice nursing.

Each student, throughout the two years, provides primary health care for children and adolescents in a variety of clinical settings, including community-based and private practices as well as school-based health centers. In addition, students select a specialty clinical rotation with relevance to pediatric primary care. In all clinical placements, the role of the PNP-PC as a member of an interdisciplinary team and coordinator across systems of care within the context of family is emphasized. The PNP-PC specialty curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Certification in primary care through the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board or the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

PNP-PC courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking a PNP-PC specialty course must consult with the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Primary Care Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Primary Care I A
Advanced Pediatric Health Assessment and Clinical Reasoning
Individual and Family Development during Childhood
Primary Care of Children I: Health Promotion
Primary Care of Children I Clinical Practice
Primary Care of Adolescents
Spring Term
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Primary Care of Adolescents Clinical 1
Primary Care of Children II
Primary Care of Children II Clinical Practice
School Health Clinical Practice 1
Advanced Pediatric Pharmacology

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Primary Care of Adolescents Clinical 1
Primary Care of Children III
Primary Care of Children III Clinical Practice
School Health Clinical Practice 1
Specialty Pediatric Primary Care Clinical
Spring Term
Primary Care of Children IV
Primary Care of Children IV Clinical Practice
Chronic Health Conditions in Children and Adolescents
Specialty Pediatric Primary Care Clinical

Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) specialty prepares graduates for advanced practice providing psychiatric–mental health services to individuals across the lifespan and their family members in a variety of settings and roles. Courses focus on theories, research evidence, and clinical application related to mental health assessment and differential diagnosis, neurobiology, psychopathology, psychopharmacology, and psychotherapeutic modalities including individual, group, and family therapy. There is also emphasis on health promotion and risk prevention as students evaluate and monitor comorbid illnesses and conditions occurring with primary psychiatric diagnoses.

Each student, throughout the two years, provides a wide range of services in a variety of clinical settings, which may include acute emergency psychiatric services, community mental health centers, office-based and private practice, home-based care, integrated psychiatric and primary care, substance abuse and forensic sites, and acute and long-term care facilities. Through application of evidence-based research skills, students evaluate systems of care, design evidence-based practice solutions, and work in collaboration with the multidisciplinary team. Upon completion of the required curriculum, students are prepared to apply for certification as a psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner with a lifespan focus through the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

PMHNP courses are only open to students enrolled in the specialty. Students from other specialties who are interested in taking a PMHNP specialty course must consult with the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Year One

Summer Term
Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (incoming RNs only)
Fall Term
Advanced Pathophysiology
Mental Health Assessment across the Lifespan
Psychopathology across the Lifespan I
Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan I and II
Individual Psychotherapy I
Spring Term
Advanced Pharmacology
Statistics and Research for Evidence-Based Practice Nursing
Psychopathology across the Lifespan II
Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan I and II
Individual Psychotherapy II
Clinical Psychopharmacology across the Lifespan

Year Two

Fall Term
Transitions to Professional Practice
Promoting Health in the Community
Clinical Outcome Management in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing
Group Psychotherapy
Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan III
Spring Term
Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan IV
Applied Psychopharmacology across the Lifespan
Family Psychotherapy

Concentrations

Yale School of Nursing offers students the opportunity to specialize in a particular concentration area that further develops a clinical or conceptual interest. The four concentrations are: Diabetes Care, Gender and Sexuality Health Justice, Oncology, and Research. Upon completion of the concentration, students may be eligible for the certification exam in the area of the concentration.

Application 

First-year specialty students in good standing, and with adviser approval, are encouraged to submit an online application to a concentration of their choice. Those interested are encouraged to visit the YSN website for concentration-specific information. Communication about concentrations and an opportunity to meet with the concentration coordinator are shared in the late summer/early fall. Enrollment is limited.

Concentration Fee

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, students pursuing a concentration will not incur additional tuition charges in the 2020–2021 academic year. Starting with the 2021–2022 academic year, those pursuing a concentration will incur additional fees.

Diabetes Care Concentration

The Diabetes Care concentration consists of a series of courses that focus on advanced preparation in the subspecialty of diabetes care practice and management. It is designed for current M.S.N. students in their final year of study. Students are required to complete a series of didactic courses and a clinical practice course, which includes comprehensive management of diabetes patients. 

The concentration is open to students in the Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Primary Care, and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Acute Care specialties. The concentration is designed to prepare specialists in these fields for practice in diabetes care and management.

All students in the concentration enroll in Advanced Concepts and Principles of Diabetes Care (NURS 6100), and Clinical Practice in Diabetes Care and Management (NURS 6110 and NURS 6111), which require four hours per week of clinical practice. The course work encompasses diabetes care, its complications across the lifespan, and  the pathophysiology and management of type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, monogenic forms of diabetes, and gestational diabetes. Concentration coordinator: Elizabeth Doyle

Gender and Sexuality Health Justice Concentration

The Gender and Sexuality Health Justice concentration is designed to educate current M.S.N. students in their final specialty year about the health disparities of LGBTQIA+ patients through a racial and economic justice lens. Students are taught about trans hormonal care, incarceration, substance use, and mental health issues in LGBTQIA+ communities. Upon completion of the concentration, students may be eligible to take the AAHIVM-specialist examination and be certified as buprenorphine-naloxone (suboxone) prescribers upon NP/CNM certification.

All students in this concentration are required to enroll in Gender and Sexuality Health Justice I, II, and III (NURS 6180, NURS 6190, and NURS 6200) and a clinical conference course (NURS 6202). Students may elect to enroll in the didactic courses only without applying to the concentration. Concentration coordinator: Ronica Mukerjee

Oncology Concentration

The Oncology concentration is designed to provide current M.S.N. students with a foundation of knowledge and skill for an advanced practice nursing role in the care of adults with cancer. Students are required to complete a series of didactic courses and a clinical experience. Opportunities for scholarly activities with faculty are available and encouraged.

The concentration is open to students in the Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, and Family Nurse Practitioner specialties. Students in the Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Primary Care, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner—Acute Care, and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialties must obtain permission from the concentration coordinator prior to applying to ensure placements are available. The concentration is not available to Nurse-Midwifery or Nurse-Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner students.

Students are required to enroll in Principles of Advanced Oncology Practice (NURS 6120), Advanced Management of Clinical Problems in Oncology (NURS 6130 and NURS 6131), and Clinical Practicum for Oncology Nurse Practitioners (NURS 6140 and NURS 6141) in their final year. Concentration coordinator: Marianne Davies

Research Concentration

The Research concentration is designed to further expose current M.S.N. students to nursing research and foster an interest in future doctoral study. The concentration includes a seminar in which students learn how to review the literature and develop a preliminary proposal that can be used in their application to a Ph.D. program. The concentration includes a research practicum in which students work on faculty research to gain research skills. All students in this concentration enroll in two approved graduate-level Research Seminar courses, which include a research practicum (NURS 6150 and NURS 6160).

The research practicum allows students the opportunity to work on faculty research to gain research skills. The research practicum is an equivalent of three hours per week participating in a faculty member’s ongoing research (45 hours/term). The faculty member will assist the student in preparing goals and objectives for the experience and meet with the student at a minimum of every two weeks for research mentoring and supervision.

The concentration is open to M.S.N. students in their final year of study. Concentration coordinator: Margaret Grey

Global Health Track

The Global Health track is designed to prepare students to serve global populations both internationally and domestically as clinicians, educators, scholars, and policy makers. In the track, students are exposed to a range of global health concepts through interdisciplinary didactic course work and through their global health clinical and scholarly activities. All students in the track take two approved graduate-level courses in global health from a preselected list curated from Yale schools or departments. Students must also complete a minimum of 60 additional clinical hours either in an international setting with YSN-approved preceptors or in a domestic site serving global populations by enrolling in Clinical Practice I and II for Global Health Track (NURS 6230 and NURS 6240).

Domestic experiences with local resettlement and reintegration organizations are also available as clinical opportunities. These experiences include developing and presenting educational programs to groups of refugees, immigrants, or asylum seekers; creating training materials for resettlement agencies; or serving as a cultural companion or health navigator for newly arrived families.

The track is open to students in their first year of specialty study in the M.S.N. program. Enrollment is limited. Students are encouraged to complete a track application in the fall term of their first specialty year. Specialty faculty recommendation is required. Students are also strongly advised to discuss their interests with the YSN global health clinical coordinator or the associate dean for global health and equity prior to applying to the Global Health track. Track coordinator: Patricia Ryan-Krause