Archaeological Studies (ARCG)

* ARCG 000b / ANTH 331b / ARCG 354b / EVST 354b / HIST 204Jb / NELC 000b / NELC 324b, The Ancient State: Genesis and Crisis from Mesopotamia to MexicoHarvey Weiss

Ancient states were societies with surplus agricultural production, classes, specialization of labor, political hierarchies, monumental public architecture and, frequently, irrigation, cities, and writing. Pristine state societies, the earliest civilizations, arose independently from simple egalitarian hunting and gathering societies in six areas of the world. How and why these earliest states arose are among the great questions of post-Enlightenment social science. This course explains (1) why this is a problem, to this day, (2) the dynamic environmental forces that drove early state formation, and (3) the unresolved fundamental questions of ancient state genesis and crisis, law-like regularities or a chance coincidence of heterogenous forces?  HU, SO
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* ARCG 001b / AFST 001b / NELC 001b, Egypt and Northeast Africa: A Multidisciplinary ApproachJohn Darnell

An introduction to Egyptology, examining approximately 10,000 years of Nile Valley cultural records and 3,000 years of Egyptian history. The course presents an overview of the historical and archaeological study of Egypt and her southern neighbor Nubia. Various original written and visual sources are used, including the collections of the Peabody Museum and the Yale Art Gallery, with some material accessible in the classroom. Students gain a basic understanding of the hieroglyphic script and the Ancient Egyptian language, and are able to read some inscriptions in museum visits at the end of the course. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* ARCG 031b / EVST 030b / NELC 026b, Origins of Civilization: Egypt and MesopotamiaHarvey Weiss

The origins of the earliest civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt along the Nile and Tigris-Euphrates Rivers explored with archaeological, historical and environmental data for the origins of agriculture, the classes and hierarchies that marked earliest cities, states and empires, the innovative monumental architecture, writing, imperial expansion, and new national ideologies. How and why these civilizational processes occurred with the momentous societal collapses at periods of abrupt climate change. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU, SO
TTh 9am-10:15am

* ARCG 128b / AFST 128b / EGYP 128b / NELC 129b / RLST 251b, Magic and Ritual in Ancient Egypt and the Near EastJohn Darnell

Introduction to ancient Egyptian magic and rituals with an overview on the use of magic and discussion of the different rituals and festivals attested in Ancient Egypt and the Near East.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

ARCG 161a / CLCV 161a / HSAR 247a, Art and Myth in Greek AntiquityStaff

Visual exploration of Greek mythology through the study of ancient Greek art and architecture. Greek gods, heroes, and mythological scenes foundational to Western culture; the complex nature of Greek mythology; how art and architecture rendered myths ever present in ancient Greek daily experience; ways in which visual representations can articulate stories. Use of collections in the Yale University Art Gallery.  HU0 Course cr
HTBA

ARCG 171a / ANTH 171a, Great Civilizations of the Ancient WorldAnne Underhill

A survey of selected prehistoric and historical cultures through examination of archaeological sites and materials. Emphasis on the methodological and theoretical approaches by which archaeologists recover, analyze, and interpret the material remains of the past.  SO0 Course cr
MWF 10:30am-11:20am

ARCG 228b / ANTH 223b, The Anthropology of WarWilliam Honeychurch

An integrated anthropological perspective on human conflict and organized violence. Questions include the definition of war, the inevitability of war, lessons to be learned from archaeological evidence, and the effects of war on individuals and groups. Source material includes the study of human evolution and nonhuman primates, the archeological record, and ethnography of the contemporary world.  SO
HTBA

ARCG 232a / ANTH 232a / LAST 232a, Ancient Civilizations of the AndesRichard Burger

Survey of the archaeological cultures of Peru and Bolivia from the earliest settlement through the late Inca state.  SO
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

ARCG 244a / NELC 109a / RLST 245a, The Age of AkhenatonStaff

Study of the period of the Egyptian pharaoh Akhenaton (reigned 1353–1336 B.C.E.), often termed the Amarna Revolution, from historical, literary, religious, artistic, and archaeological perspectives. Consideration of the wider Egyptian, ancient Near Eastern, African, and Mediterranean contexts. Examination of the international diplomacy, solar theology, and artistic developments of the period. Reading of primary source material in translation.  HU0 Course cr
HTBA

* ARCG 245a / NELC 243a, Archaeology of Ancient Egypt: An IntroductionGregory Marouard

This seminar is an introductory class that examines in detail the archaeology of ancient Egypt following the chronological order of Egyptian history and covering almost 4000 years, from the late Neolithic period to the end of the Greco-Roman period. The aim is not only to give a comprehensive overview of major sites and discoveries but also to use as much as possible information from recent excavations, discuss problems and priorities concerning this field, offer an introduction to new fieldwork methods and approaches used in Egypt as well as a short history of this discipline.   HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ARCG 253b / ANTH 253b, Introduction to Experimental ArchaeologyEllery Frahm

Experimental archaeology is one of the most important tools to develop and test models which link human behaviors and natural forces to the archaeological record.  This class explores the elements of good experimental design and procedures. ANTH 316L, ARCG 316L recommended.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

ARCG 264b / ANTH 264b / SPAN 404b, Aztec Archaeology and EthnohistoryOswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos

An anthropological and ethnohistorical examination of the Aztec civilization that dominated much of Mexico from the fourteenth century until the Spanish Conquest of 1521.  SO
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

ARCG 267b / ANTH 267b, Human EvolutionJessica Thompson

The main objective of this course is for students to learn how evidence and theory intersect with some of the peculiarities of history to form the modern discipline of paleoanthropology. It deals with scientific questions of human origins and evolution, and what we think we know of our own ancestry over the past 6 million years. We cover key tools such as evolutionary theory, paleontology, archaeology, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, phylogenetic analysis, genetics, and functional morphology. Using these tools, we critically examine what key debates have taken place over the last century of exploration and discovery in human evolutionary research, learning how unconventional thinking and spectacular discoveries have shaped current knowledge of our origins. Students learn what a surprising amount of information scientists can discern from fragmentary fossils, and are brought up to date with the most current discoveries and debates in human evolution. Students also see how human origins are conveyed to a broader audience, and how misunderstandings about how it happened can propagate and be misused. Knowledge of introductory biological anthropology or biology are helpful.  SC, SO0 Course cr
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ARCG 275a / ANTH 275a, The Green Hell and the Mother Serpent: Amazonian Archaeology, Ethnography, and PoliticsRichard Burger and Corey Herrmann

Survey and seminar discussing the archaeology and ethnography of greater Amazonia, along with the political stakes of this heritage for modern Indigenous communities in the region. Introduces students to the varied geography and ecology of greater Amazonia, before delving into topics such as: the archaeological record of domestication and landscape investment by past Indigenous societies; the ethnographic and historical records of their descendants; the contested spheres of knowledge production in anthropology that underpins both of these records; and the modern political struggles that Indigenous communities face today amid deforestation and the pursuit of economic development.  SO
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

ARCG 294a / ANTH 294a, The Ancient MayaOswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos

Introduction to the archaeological study of ancient Maya civilization in southern Mexico and northern Central America. Maya origins and modes of adaptation to a tropical forest environment; political history of the Classic Maya and competing theories about their collapse; overviews of Maya art, calendar, and writing.  SO
TTh 9am-10:15am

ARCG 316La / ANTH 316La, Introduction to Archaeological Laboratory SciencesEllery Frahm

Introduction to techniques of archaeological laboratory analysis, with quantitative data styles and statistics appropriate to each. Topics include dating of artifacts, sourcing of ancient materials, remote sensing, and microscopic and biochemical analysis. Specific techniques covered vary from year to year.  SC
W 1:30pm-4:30pm

* ARCG 354b / ANTH 331b / ARCG 000b / EVST 354b / HIST 204Jb / NELC 000b / NELC 324b, The Ancient State: Genesis and Crisis from Mesopotamia to MexicoHarvey Weiss

Ancient states were societies with surplus agricultural production, classes, specialization of labor, political hierarchies, monumental public architecture and, frequently, irrigation, cities, and writing. Pristine state societies, the earliest civilizations, arose independently from simple egalitarian hunting and gathering societies in six areas of the world. How and why these earliest states arose are among the great questions of post-Enlightenment social science. This course explains (1) why this is a problem, to this day, (2) the dynamic environmental forces that drove early state formation, and (3) the unresolved fundamental questions of ancient state genesis and crisis, law-like regularities or a chance coincidence of heterogenous forces?  HU, SO
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* ARCG 385a / ANTH 385a, Archaeological CeramicsAnne Underhill

Archaeological methods for analyzing and interpreting ceramics, arguably the most common type of object found in ancient sites. Focus on what different aspects of ceramic vessels reveal about the people who made them and used them.  SO
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* ARCG 406a / HSAR 407a / HUMS 386, In, Out, and Back: African Art Collection, Exhibition, and RestitutionCecile Fromont

This seminar investigates the role and place of material and immaterial objects of African expressive culture in their original contexts of production and display on the continent, the circumstances of their displacement to the European galleries and museum where they have featured since the early modern period, and the accelerating restitution movement aiming to bring them back to African communities and states. Collection visits, guest speakers, readings, and student research address topics such as the scientific and artistic project of early modern cabinets of curiosities; the birth of ethnology and the advent of the museum; art, race, violence; the entanglements between collection, commerce, and colonialism; and contemporary trends in museum decolonization and restitution.  HU, SO
T 9:25am-11:15am

* ARCG 450a / ANTH 450a, Analysis of Lithic TechnologyOswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos

Introduction to the analysis of chipped and ground stone tools, including instruction in manufacturing chipped stone tools from obsidian. Review of the development of stone tool technology from earliest tools to those of historical periods; relevance of this technology to subsistence, craft specialization, and trade. Discussion of the recording, analysis, and drawing of artifacts, and of related studies such as sourcing and use-wear analysis.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

ARCG 464b / ANTH 464b / E&EB 464b, Human OsteologyEric Sargis

A lecture and laboratory course focusing on the characteristics of the human skeleton and its use in studies of functional morphology, paleodemography, and paleopathology. Laboratories familiarize students with skeletal parts; lectures focus on the nature of bone tissue, its biomechanical modification, sexing, aging, and interpretation of lesions.  SC, SO0 Course cr
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* ARCG 492b / ANTH 492b / NELC 321b, Imaging Ancient WorldsKlaus Wagensonner and Agnete Lassen

The interpretation of epigraphic and archaeological material within the broader context of landscape, by means of creating a virtual model to reconstruct the sensory experiences of the ancient peoples who created those sites. Use of new technologies in computer graphics, including 3D imaging, to support current research in archaeology and anthropology.
MW 9am-10:15am