Environmental Engineering (ENVE)

* ENVE 120b / CENG 120b / ENAS 120b, Introduction to Environmental EngineeringJohn Fortner

Introduction to engineering principles related to the environment, with emphasis on causes of problems and technologies for abatement. Topics include air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous chemical and emerging environmental technologies. Prerequisites: high school calculus and chemistry or CHEM 161, 165 or CHEM 163, 167 (may be taken concurrently) or permission of instructor.  QR, SC
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

ENVE 314a / CENG 314a, Transport Phenomena IKyle Vanderlick

First of a two-semester sequence. Unified treatment of momentum, energy, and chemical species transport including conservation laws, flux relations, and boundary conditions. Topics include convective and diffusive transport, transport with homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions and/or phase change, and interfacial transport phenomena. Emphasis on problem analysis and mathematical modeling, including problem formulation, scaling arguments, analytical methods, approximation techniques, and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: ENAS 194 or permission of the instructor.  QR, SCRP
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

ENVE 315b / CENG 315b, Transport Phenomena IIMichael Loewenberg

Unified treatment of momentum, energy, and chemical species transport including conservation laws, flux relations, and boundary conditions. Topics include convective and diffusive transport, transport with homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions and/or phase change, and interfacial transport phenomena. Emphasis on problem analysis and mathematical modeling, including problem formulation, scaling arguments, analytical methods, approximation techniques, and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: ENAS 194 or permission of instructor.  QR, SC
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* ENVE 320a / ENRG 320a / MENG 320a, Energy, Engines, and ClimateAlessandro Gomez

The course aims to cover the fundamentals of a field that is central to the future of the world. The field is rapidly evolving and, although an effort will be made to keep abreast of the latest developments, the course emphasis is on timeless fundamentals, especially from a physics perspective. Topics under consideration include: key concepts of climate change as a result of global warming, which is the primary motivator of a shift in energy supply and technologies to wean humanity off fossil fuels; carbon-free energy sources, with primary focus on solar, wind and associated needs for energy storage and grid upgrade; traditional fossil-fuel power plants and engines, that are currently involved in 85% of energy conversion worldwide and we can’t “turn on a dime”. Elements of thermodynamics are covered throughout the course as needed, including the definition of various forms of energy, work and heat as energy transfer, the principle of conservation of energy, first law and second law, and rudiments of heat engines. We conclude with some considerations on energy policy and with the "big picture" on how to tackle future energy needs.  Designed for juniors and seniors in science and engineering. Prerequisite: MENG 211 or permission from the instructor.  QR, SC
TTh 9am-10:15am

ENVE 360b / ENAS 360b, Green Engineering and Sustainable DesignJulie Zimmerman

Study of green engineering, focusing on key approaches to advancing sustainability through engineering design. Topics include current design, manufacturing, and disposal processes; toxicity and benign alternatives; policy implications; pollution prevention and source reduction; separations and disassembly; material and energy efficiencies and flows; systems analysis; biomimicry; and life cycle design, management, and analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 161, 165 or 163, 167 (or CHEM 112, 113, or 114, 115), or permission of instructor.
MW 1pm-2:15pm

ENVE 373a / CENG 373a, Air Pollution ControlDrew Gentner

An overview of air quality problems worldwide with a focus on emissions, chemistry, transport, and other processes that govern dynamic behavior in the atmosphere. Quantitative assessment of the determining factors of air pollution (e.g., transportation and other combustion–related sources, chemical transformations), climate change, photochemical “smog,” pollutant measurement techniques, and air quality management strategies. Prerequisite: ENVE 120.  QR, SCRP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ENVE 377a / CENG 377a, Water-Energy NexusLea Winter

This course explores processes and technologies at the water-energy nexus. We utilize chemical and environmental engineering fundamentals to explore the links between maintaining clean water supply and energy security globally, as well as implications for environmental contamination and climate change. We develop a quantitative understanding of water chemistry and energy considerations for topics including traditional water and wastewater treatment, energy recovery from wastewater, membrane processes, water electrolysis for energy storage and electrochemical contaminant conversion, industrial water consumption and wastewater production, underground water sources and water for oil and gas, opportunities for reuse of nontraditional source waters and contaminant valorization, and considerations for decentralization, resilience, and electrification. Quantitative understanding of these processes will be attained based on mass and energy balances, systems engineering, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Prerequisite: ENVE 120 or permission of instructor. The course is primarily designed for juniors and seniors majoring in environmental engineering, but students in other engineering majors are welcome. Students in non-engineering majors are also welcome but are encouraged to communicate with the instructor to make sure they have sufficient background knowledge in required mathematics.    QR, SC
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

ENVE 416b / CENG 416b, Chemical Engineering Process DesignYehia Khalil

Study of the techniques for and the design of chemical processes and plants, applying the principles of chemical engineering and economics. Emphasis on flowsheet development and equipment selection, cost estimation and economic analysis, design strategy and optimization, safety and hazards analysis, and environmental and ethical considerations. Enrollment limited to seniors majoring in Chemical Engineering or Environmental Engineering.  QR, SCRP
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

ENVE 438a, Environmental Organic ChemistryJohn Fortner

This course examines major physical and chemical attributes and processes affecting the behavior of organic compounds in environmental systems, including volatilization, sorption/attachment, diffusion, and reactivity.  Emphasis is placed on legacy pollutants (e.g. TCE, PCBs, DDT) and along with emerging contaminants of concern (e.g. pharmaceuticals, explosives, etc).  The course reviews basic concepts from physical chemistry and examines the relationships between chemical structure, properties, and environmental behavior of  organic compounds.  Physical and chemical processes important to the fate, treatment, and transformation of specific organic compounds are addressed including solubility, volatilization, partitioning, sorption/attachment, bioaccumulation, and bulk environmental transformation pathways.  Equilibrium and kinetic models based on these principles are used to predict the fate and transport of organic contaminants in the environment. Priority given to seniors or permission of instructor.   QR, SC
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

ENVE 441a, Biological Processes in Environmental EngineeringJordan Peccia

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry, including stoichiometry, kinetics, and energetics of biochemical reactions, microbial growth, and microbial ecology, as they pertain to biological processes for the transformation of environmental contaminants; principles for analysis and design of aerobic and anaerobic processes, including suspended- and attached-growth systems, for treatment of conventional and hazardous pollutants in municipal and industrial wastewaters and in groundwater. Prerequisites: CHEM 161, 165, or 163, 167 (or CHEM 112, 113, or 114, 115, or 118); MCDB 290 or equivalent; or with permission of instructor.  SC
MW 1pm-2:15pm

ENVE 473b, Air Quality and EnergyDrew Gentner

The production and use of energy explored as a source of air pollution worldwide. Assessment of emissions and physical/chemical processes; the effects of emissions from energy sources; the behavior of pollutants in energy systems and in the atmosphere. Topics include traditional and emerging energy technology, climate change, atmospheric aerosols, tropospheric ozone, and transport/modeling/mitigation. Prerequisite: ENVE 373 or equivalent.  SC
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENVE 490a or b, Senior ProjectJohn Fortner

Individual research and design projects supervised by a faculty member in Environmental Engineering, or in a related field with permission of the director of undergraduate studies.
HTBA