Political Science (PLSC)

PLSC S220a / PLSC 220a / WGSS 220a, Gender and PoliticsAndrea Aldrich

Exploration of theoretical and empirical work in political science to study the relationship between gender and politics in the United States and around the world. Topics include women's representative in legislative and executive branch politics in democratic regimes; the impact of gender stereotypes on elections and public opinion; conditions that impact the supply and demand of candidates across genders; and the underrepresentation of women in political institutions. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,200. Session A: May 27-June 28  SO
T 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 015a, The Politics of Human Flourishing: Ancient Political PhilosophyHeather Wilford

This course considers ancient Greek perspectives on fundamental questions about human nature, human flourishing, the philosophic life, the purpose of politics, and the possibilities and limits of reason, justice, freedom, and law. Our authors invite us to reflect on the purposes and practices of our lives and offer us a perspective from which to challenge prevailing assumptions about liberal democracy and the modern state. Although they lived in a very different time and place, the course seeks to engage with their arguments about the human good, human happiness, and the best regime as though they were our contemporaries.   Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PLSC 028a, American Constitutionalism: Power and its LimitsGordon Silverstein

What happens when a modern superpower tries to govern itself under an 18th Century Constitution? Using original documents, contemporaneous books, and U.S. Supreme Court cases, this course explores the debates that have defined America's struggle to live up to its sometimes conflicting commitments to liberty, equality and the consent of the governed. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PLSC 030a, Law and the Limits of FreedomAlexander Rosas

This course evaluates the desired role of law in free and modern societies and dissects, more broadly, the relationship between law, the state, and the individual in such societies. Particularly, this course considers when, if ever, it is appropriate to use law to limit freedom in the name of equality, security, community, utility, and/or morality. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

PLSC 116a, Comparative Politics: States, Regimes, and ConflictStaff

Introduction to the study of politics and political life in the world outside the United States. State formation and nationalism, the causes and consequences of democracy, the functioning of authoritarian regimes, social movements and collective action, and violence.  SO0 Course cr
HTBA

PLSC 130a / GLBL 260a, Nuclear PoliticsAlex Debs

The pursuit, use, and non-use of nuclear weapons from the Manhattan Project to the present. The effect of the international system, regional dynamics, alliance politics, and domestic politics in the decision to pursue or forgo nuclear weapons. The role of nuclear weapons in international relations, the history of the Cold War, and recent challenges in stemming nuclear proliferation.  SO
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PLSC 161a / GLBL 344a / HIST 483Ja, Studies in Grand Strategy IIMichael Brenes

The study of grand strategy, of how individuals and groups can accomplish large ends with limited means. During the fall term, students put into action the ideas studied in the spring term by applying concepts of grand strategy to present day issues. Admission is by application only; the cycle for the current year is closed. This course does not fulfill the history seminar requirement, but may count toward geographical distributional credit within the History major for any region studied, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies. Prerequisite: PLSC 321. Previous study courses in political science, history, global affairs, or subjects with broad interdisciplinary relevance encouraged.  SO
M 2:30pm-4:20pm

* PLSC 167b / GLBL 284b, Mass Atrocities in Global PoliticsDavid Simon

Examination of the impact of global politics and institutions on the commission, execution, prevention, and aftermath of mass atrocities.  SO
HTBA

PLSC 175a / AFST 175a, Africa in International RelationsDavid Simon

This courses examines key facets of how African countries interact with the rest of the world, and with other countries on the continent. Focusing mostly on Sub-Saharan African countries, it looks at international economic relations (focusing on aid but also addressing trade, investment, and debt); peacemaking and peacebuilding; and regional governance institutions.  SO
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

PLSC 182a / GLBL 236a, The Politics of International Law and CooperationTyler Pratt

This course focuses on the political processes and institutions that facilitate cooperation among states. Students examine the obstacles to cooperation in the international arena, the reasons for the creation of international laws and institutions, and the extent to which such institutions actually affect state policy. Students also explore the tension between international cooperation and concerns about power, state sovereignty, and institutional legitimacy. Course materials draw from a variety of substantive issues, including conflict prevention, trade, human rights, and environmental protection.  SO0 Course cr
TTh 9am-10:15am

PLSC 205a, The American PresidencyStaff

Examination of the constitutional law, historical development, and current operations of the American presidency. Topics include formal powers, the organization and mobilization of popular support, the modern executive establishment, and the politics of presidential leadership.  SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 209a / HIST 167Ja, Congress in the Light of HistoryDavid Mayhew

This course begins by studying analytic themes, including congressional structure, incentives bearing on members and parties, conditions of party control, supermajority rules, and polarization, followed by narrative works of major political showdowns entailing Congress such as those in 1850, 1876-77, 1919 (defeat of the Versailles Treaty), 1937 (defeat of court-packing), 1954 (the McCarthy-Army hearings), 1964 (civil rights), 1973-74 (Watergate), and 1993-94 (defeat of health care). Students also examine a series of policy performances, for the better or the worse in today’s judgments, ranging from early state-building through reacting to the Great Depression, constructing a welfare state, and addressing climate change. This is a reading course and does not accommodate senior essays.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 210a, Political Preferences and American Political BehaviorJoshua Kalla

Introduction to research methods and topics in American political behavior. Focus on decision making from the perspective of ordinary citizens. Topics include utility theory, heuristics and biases, political participation, retrospective voting, the consequences of political ignorance, the effects of campaigns, and the ability of voters to hold politicians accountable for their actions.  SO
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 212a / EP&E 390a / EVST 212a, Democracy and SustainabilityMichael Fotos

Democracy, liberty, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Concepts include institutional analysis, democratic consent, property rights, market failure, and common pool resources. Topics of policy substance are related to human use of the environment and to U.S. and global political institutions.  WR, SO
Th 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 215b / EVST 255b / F&ES 255b / GLBL 282b, Environmental Law and PoliticsJohn Wargo

We explore relations among environmental quality, health, and law. We consider global-scale avoidable challenges such as: environmentally related human illness, climate instability, water depletion and contamination, food and agriculture, air pollution, energy, packaging, culinary globalization, and biodiversity loss. We evaluate the effectiveness of laws and regulations intended to reduce or prevent environmental and health damages. Additional laws considered include rights of secrecy, property, speech, worker protection, and freedom from discrimination. Comparisons among the US and  EU legal standards and precautionary policies will also be examined.  Ethical concerns of justice, equity, and transparency are prominent themes.   SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 220a / PLSC S220a / WGSS 220a, Women & PoliticsAndrea Aldrich

Exploration of theoretical and empirical work in political science to study the relationship between women and politics in the United States and around the world. Topics include women's descriptive and substantive representation in legislative and executive branch politics in democratic regimes; the impact of gender stereotypes on elections and public opinion; conditions that impact the supply and demand of candidates across genders; and the underrepresentation of women in political institutions.  WR, SO
T 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 223a / EDST 223a, Learning Democracy: The Theory and Practice of Civic EducationAmir Fairdosi

This is a seminar on the theory and practice of civic education. We begin by investigating philosophies of civic education, asking such questions as: What is civic education and what is its purpose? What knowledge, skills, and values promote human flourishing and the cultivation of a democratic society? What roll can and should schools play in this cultivation? In the next part of the course we focus on civic education in practice, exploring various approaches to teaching civics and the empirical evidence in support of each method’s effectiveness. We also discuss variations in access to civic education opportunities across socioeconomic, demographic, and national contexts, and how societies might deal with these disparities.  SO
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 228a / EP&E 306a, First Amendment and Ethics of LawKaren Goodrow

This course addresses the First Amendment and freedom of speech, focusing on the ethical implications of restrictions on free speech, as well as the exercise of free speech. Course topics and discussions include the “fighting words” doctrine, hate speech, true threats, content regulated speech, freedom of speech and the internet, and the so-called “right to be forgotten.” By the end of the course, students recognize the role free speech plays in society, including its negative and positive impacts on various segments of society. Students also have an understanding of the competing interests arising from the First Amendment’s right to free speech, and can analyze how these competing interests are weighed and measured in the United States as compared with other countries.  SO
W 6:30pm-8:20pm

* PLSC 238a / EDST 238a, The Politics of Public EducationMira Debs

Examination of the deep political divides, past and present, over public education in the United States. Fundamental questions, including who gets to determine where and how children are educated, who should pay for public education, and the role of education as a counter for poverty, remain politically contested. The course explores these conflicts from a variety of political perspectives. Students learn journalistic methods, including narrative, opinion and digital storytelling, developing the necessary skills to participate in the national conversation around education policy and politics.  WR, SO
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 247a / AMST 245a / ENGL 246a, The Media and DemocracyJoanne Lipman

In an era of "fake news," when mainstream media is attacked as the "enemy of the people" and social platforms are enabling the spread of misinformation, how do journalists hold power to account? Students explore topics including objectivity versus advocacy, and hate speech versus First Amendment speech protections. Case studies will span from 19th century yellow journalism to the media’s role in #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter movements.  SO
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 253a or b / ENGL 467a or b, JournalismStaff

Examination of the practices, methods, and impact of journalism, with focus on reporting and writing; consideration of how others have done it, what works, and what doesn’t. Students learn how to improve story drafts, follow best practices in journalism, improve methods for obtaining, skeptically evaluating, and assessing information, as well as writing a story for others to read. The core course for Yale Journalism Scholars. No prerequisites.  WR
M 9am-10:50am

PLSC 254a, Political Parties in the American SystemStaff

The evolution of American political parties and the role of parties and partisanship in contemporary government and elections. Empirical and theoretical accounts of parties, including divided government, parties in Congress, realignment, responsible party government, party identification, and ideology. Elite-led polarization, decline and resurgence of strong parties, and the antiparty constitutional tradition.  SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 255a, America From ScratchAmir Fairdosi

What would the United States look like without a Supreme Court? Without a Senate?  Without states? What if the United States had ten presidents instead of one? Or no president at all? As radical as these constitutional propositions might sound, they were all at least considered by America’s founders. In this class, we examine such proposals—proposals considered unthinkable today, but not during the Constitutional Convention or in other countries throughout history. We read the American founding documents, speeches, and letters considering these “radical” constitutional designs and connect them to attempts to realize these reforms today.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 256b / EP&E 248b, American Political InstitutionsMichael Fotos

The origins and development of American political institutions, especially in relation to constitutional choice and the agency of persons seeking freedom, equality, and self-governing capabilities as a driver of constitutional change.  Key concepts include: American federalism, compound republic, citizenship, social movements, racial justice, and nonviolence.  WR, SO
HTBA

* PLSC 269b / AMST 427b / WGSS 427b, Politics of Gender and Sexuality in the United StatesDara Strolovitch

The 2016 Presidential election made clear that gender matters a great deal in American politics, but it also revealed that how gender matters is far from obvious. This course explores the ways in which gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by American politics and public policy. We explore the history, findings, and controversies in research about gender and sexuality in American politics from a range of approaches, examining what political science research helps us understand about questions such as: Does gender influence political campaigns and whether people will vote for particular candidates? Once elected, are gender and sexuality related to legislators’ behavior in office? How are norms related to race, class, gender, and sexuality reflected in and constructed by public policy? We also explore feminist, queer, and intersectional theories and methodologies and important work from other disciplines and interdisciplines, paying particular attention to the implications of intersectionality for understanding gender, sexuality, and politics. We also analyze the ways in which gender and sexuality intersect with other politically salient categories, identities, and forms of marginalization, including race, ethnicity, class, and ideological and partisan identification, paying particular attention to their implications for the 2016, 2018, and 2020 elections.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 274a, Cities: Making Public Choices in New HavenJohn DeStefano

Examination of cities, particularly the relationship of people to place and most importantly to one another, through the prism and experiences of the City of New Haven. Exploration of how concepts of social capital and legitimacy of institutions in policy design and execution, are key to the well being of community residents. How cities, in the context of retreating or antagonistic strategies by the state and  federal governments, can be key platforms for future economic and social wealth creation.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

PLSC 277a, The United States CongressStaff

The United States Congress is arguably the most powerful legislature in the world. Its actions—and inaction—affect taxes, healthcare, business, the environment, and international politics. To understand the nature of legislative power in Congress and in democracies more broadly, we ask: How do successful politicians become powerful? How do they navigate rules and institutions to their advantage? What is the proper role of the lawmaking in regulating private business? Should we limit legislative lobbying and put a cap on campaign contributions? Class discussions use case studies including the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s, the Tax Reform Act under Reagan, and the Affordable Care Act under Obama. Exercises include coding and data analysis. The goal is to equip students with a broad understanding of the principles of politics, economics, public policy, and data science. Prerequisites: No prior knowledge about U.S. law or history is necessary. Prior experience (or concurrent enrollment) in programming, coding, or data science is beneficial, but not a prerequisite.  Students without coding experience should be prepared to spend extra time in the programming sessions during the first half of our class.  SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 283b / EP&E 235b / PHIL 457b, Recent Work on JusticeThomas Pogge

In-depth study of one contemporary book, author, or debate in political philosophy, political theory, or normative economics. Focus varies from year to year based on student interest and may include a ground-breaking new book, the life's work of a prominent author, or an important theme in contemporary political thought.  HU
HTBA

* PLSC 286a / HIST 292Ja / HUMS 279a, Democracy and the French RevolutionIsaac Nakhimovsky

The French Revolution of 1789 and its legacies, as viewed through the late-eighteenth-century debates about democracy, equality, representative government, and historical change that shaped an enduring agenda for historical and political thought in Europe and around the world.  WR, HU
W 9:25am-11:15am

PLSC 290a / SOCY 151a, Foundations of Modern Social TheoryPhilip Gorski

Major works of social thought from the beginning of the modern era through the 190s. Attention to social and intellectual concepts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Writers include W.E.B. Du Bois, Simone De Beauvoir, Adam Smith, Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Karl Marx.  SO0 Course cr
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PLSC 291a / PHIL 464a, Justice, Taxes, and Global Financial IntegrityThomas Pogge

Study of the formulation, interpretation, and enforcement of national and international tax rules from the perspective of national and global economic justice. Previous courses in one or two of the following: law, economics, political science, or political philosophy.  HU
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 297a / EP&E 312a, Moral Choices in PoliticsBoris Kapustin

A study of how and why people make costly moral choices in politics. Figures studied include Thomas More, Abraham Lincoln, Nelson Mandela, Václav Havel, and Aung San Suu Kyi.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

PLSC 298a / WGSS 207a, Gender, Justice, Power, InstitutionsStaff

Examination of how inequalities based on gender, race, caste, class, sexuality as well as a host of other identities are embedded in institutions that make up our social world. From the family and the home to the workplace, from the University, and the Corporation, to the Military and Media, we track how inequalities emerge and are sustained by power and institutional structures. We also see how they are challenged and what sorts of instruments are needed to challenge them. In particular, we focus on sexual politics and sexual violence as a key issue to understanding the gendered workings of institutions, in order to examine structures that sustain inequality. Through the semester, we hope to consider many domains of life–bedrooms and boardrooms, international borders and feminist movements–to understand the stubborn and sticky forms and hierarchies of power that are challenged and contested by activists, scholars, and communities.SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 302a, Liberty, Equality, and CitizenshipHeather Wilford

America is often described as a liberal democracy, but do we really know what democratic equality requires or what individual liberty demands? The ideals of our political order point to a number of philosophic questions: What is freedom? What is equality? What is a free regime? Is a democracy necessarily a free regime? Is a liberal regime necessarily democratic? This course investigates such questions through a close reading of the works of two of the greatest minds of the 18th century, Montesquieu and J.J. Rousseau. These two French philosophers had a hand in shaping modernity and in transforming a Europe of feudal monarchies into a landscape of national republics. Both authors had an outsized influence on the two great revolutions of the 18th century which tried to realize the political ideals of freedom and equality. Whether we consider Madison’s defense of the separation of powers or Robespierre’s exhortations to republican virtue, the American and French revolutions and thus the shape of the modern world bear the stamp of these two thinkers. By turning to Montesquieu and Rousseau, the course aims to illuminate some of our most contentious contemporary political debates about freedom and equality, solidarity and diversity, and international commerce and national sovereignty. The conversation between these two authors poses forcefully a question we must all consider: what does it mean to be a good citizen in the modern world?  HU
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

* PLSC 304b / EP&E 325b, Business Ethics and LawRobin Landis

This seminar is intended to provide frameworks for the analysis of ethical issues that may arise in the context of business decisions, including such aspects as the role of ethics, competing values and interests, and tools for making principled decisions. The course also covers, as appropriate, some aspects of law as they relate to business ethics. Previous courses in philosophy and ethics may be helpful.  SO
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 305b / EP&E 353b, Critique of Political ViolenceBoris Kapustin

Methods of conceptualizing political violence that are prevalent in contemporary political philosophical discourse. Use of theoretical-analytical tools to examine the modes violence assumes and the functions it performs in modern political life as well as the meanings and possibilities of nonviolence in politics.  SO
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 307b / HUMS 295b / JDST 223b, Trials of UncertaintyNorma Thompson

Is the demise of the trial at hand? The trial as cultural achievement, considered as the epitome of humanistic inquiry, where all is brought to bear on a crucial matter in an uncertain context. Truth may be hammered out or remain elusive, but the expectation in the court case has been that the adversarial mode works best for sorting out evidentiary conundrums. Inquiries into issues of meaning of the trial, its impartiality, and challenges to its endurability. The role of character, doubt, and diagnosis explored in Sophocles, Plato, Cicero, Burke, Jane Austen, Tocqueville, and Kafka, as well as in twentieth-century trials, films, documentaries, and twenty-first-century medical narratives.  WR, HU
HTBA

* PLSC 308a / EP&E 289a, Open Democracy: Reinventing Popular Rule for the 21st CenturyHelene Landemore-Jelaca

 Many today believe that the model of representative government that we have inherited from its 18th century founders is broken. It is seen as too oligarchic, disconnected, and unresponsive to the demands of 21st century citizens and, as such, no longer fitting the ideal of democracy that it was supposed to render possible in large, industrial societies. In this course we explore possible reforms and alternatives to the existing political and social system from both empirical and normative perspectives. We try to think both beyond representation by looking at new ways in which citizens can directly affect policy-making by either working with or by-passing entirely elected officials, and beyond government itself, by questioning the assumed divide between the political and the economic spheres and interrogating the internal structure and governance of the workplace.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 311a, Socialism and DemocracyLucia Rubinelli

This course explores the history of socialist political thought by focusing on how socialist thinkers addressed the problem of political organization and how they viewed democracy and its institutions. It looks at utopian socialism, theorists of the 1848 revolution in France, Proudhon’s arguments for anarchism, the problem of political organization in Marx and Engels, the Paris Commune and its afterlife in socialist theorizing, debates about democracy in the Second International, controversies over the role of parliaments, the dictatorship of the proletariat, political parties and the masses in the thought of Kautsky, Lenin, and Luxemburg.  Basic understanding and knowledge of European history is required.  HU, SO
T 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 318a, Lincoln's Statecraft and RhetoricStaff

Close reading of major speeches and letters by Abraham Lincoln, with a focus on his views concerning slavery, equality, and race in American society. The relation of words to deeds in Lincoln's practice of statecraft; his place in the history and theory of statesmanship. The emergence of Lincoln's thought from an engagement with views of the American founders; ways in which his vision of American democracy both drew upon and transformed the founders' vision.  SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 319b / EDST 218b / HUMS 258b, Democracy and EducationStephanie Almeida Nevin

What role can and should education play in upholding a democratic society? Both in theory and in practice, how might democracy challenge some of the goals of education, and how might some of the goals of education undermine democracy? This course compares and evaluates competing arguments about the role of education in a democratic society and about the impact of democracy on education. We begin the course with an introduction to some of the ancient and contemporary arguments about the relationship between education and democracy. Next, we trace the history of American political thought and its influences on this question. What political theories emerged about the kind of education required for a liberal-democratic society? Finally, we turn to some works that challenge the compatibility of education and democracy. When and how might the goals of education and democracy conflict?  HU
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 320b / EP&E 421b, Ethics, Law, and Current IssuesKaren Goodrow

Examination of how freedom of speech and bias influence the criminal justice system, focusing on wrongful convictions and administration of the death penalty. Understanding the role of potential bias at various levels and the competing interests of protecting speech, due process, and the innocent. Topics include limitations on speech, practical effects of speech, the efficacy of the death penalty, actual innocence, gender/race/economic bias and its effects on the justice system, as well as best practices for improving our sense of justice.
HTBA

* PLSC 321b / GLBL 342b / HIST 482Jb, Studies in Grand Strategy IMichael Brenes

The study of grand strategy, of how individuals and groups can accomplish large ends with limited means. The spring term focuses on key moments in history that illustrate strategic thinking in action. During the summer, students undertake research projects or internships analyzing strategic problems or aspects of strategy. The following fall, students put their ideas into action by applying concepts of grand strategy to present day issues. Admission is by application only; the cycle for the current year is closed. This course does not fulfill the history seminar requirement, but may count toward geographical distributional credit within the History major for any region studied, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies. Previous study courses in political science, history, global affairs, or subjects with broad interdisciplinary relevance encouraged.  HU, SO
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 324a / AFST 324a / EP&E 317a / HIST 368Ja, Nelson and Winnie MandelaJonny Steinberg

A study of Nelson and Winnie Mandela’s marriage and public careers and the political and philosophical questions the marriage raises. Students examine the Mandelas’ conflicting ideas on race and on the colonial experience and compare them to those of Mohandas Gandhi and Franz Fanon. Students also read recent philosophical work on forgiveness and on violence in order critically to assess the politics of reconciliation that so divided the Mandelas. The course examines the politics of global celebrity and the portrayal of men and women in public media.
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 329a / EP&E 372a / HUMS 263a, ThucydidesDaniel Schillinger

In this seminar, we undertake a careful examination of Thucydides' so-called History of the Peloponnesian War in its entirety. Central problems include the psychological and structural causes of war, the relation of justice to necessity, the susceptibility of democracy to imperialism and demagoguery, and the experience of war itself. We also engage with the secondary literature on Thucydides.   WR, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PLSC 332a / EP&E 299a / GLBL 299a, Philosophy of Science for the Study of PoliticsIan Shapiro

An examination of the philosophy of science from the perspective of the study of politics. Particular attention to the ways in which assumptions about science influence models of political behavior, the methods adopted to study that behavior, and the relations between science and democracy. Readings include works by both classic and contemporary authors.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 339a / EP&E 375a, LiberalismMordechai Levy-Eichel

What is liberalism? And why do arguments about it stand at the epicenter of our political life? Is it a political idea, or is it a philosophy that tries to carve out a space apart from high politics? Is it about rights, or about equality? Is it about freedom and liberty, or laws and regulations? Is it ancient? Is it modern? Can we even define what liberalism means, or does the attempt to do so in some way even miss the point? This class is a historical, philosophical, and political examination of one of the most important and contested ideas in the modern world. We read both critics and advocates of liberalism. We also examine it historically, sociologically, and comparatively, in order to gain a better sense of what it means in practice, and how it differs from the arguments of both its most strong supporters and defenders, and its critics. Special attention is paid to the development of the ethos and examples of liberalism. This course is also a meditation on how to study politics and political theory. What does liberalism mean, and how should we examine it? Where did it come from, and how has it changed over time?  SO
W 9:25am-11:15am

PLSC 344a / EP&E 295a, Game Theory and Political ScienceStaff

Introduction to game theory—a method by which strategic interactions among individuals and groups in society are mathematically modeled—and its applications to political science. Concepts employed by game theorists, such as Nash equilibrium, subgame perfect equilibrium, and perfect Bayesian equilibrium. Problems of cooperation, time-consistency, signaling, and reputation formation. Political applications include candidate competition, policy making, political bargaining, and international conflict. No prerequisites other than high school algebra. Political Science majors who take this course may not count ECON 159 toward the major.  QR, SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 347a / EP&E 328a / S&DS 172a, YData: Data Science for Political CampaignsJoshua Kalla

Political campaigns have become increasingly data driven. Data science is used to inform where campaigns compete, which messages they use, how they deliver them, and among which voters. In this course, we explore how data science is being used to design winning campaigns. Students gain an understanding of what data is available to campaigns, how campaigns use this data to identify supporters, and the use of experiments in campaigns. This course provides students with an introduction to political campaigns, an introduction to data science tools necessary for studying politics, and opportunities to practice the data science skills presented in S&DS 123, YData.
   QR
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

PLSC 351b / CPSC 123b / S&DS 123b / S&DS 523b, YData: An Introduction to Data ScienceEthan Meyers

Computational, programming, and statistical skills are no longer optional in our increasingly data-driven world; these skills are essential for opening doors to manifold research and career opportunities. This course aims to dramatically enhance knowledge and capabilities in fundamental ideas and skills in data science, especially computational and programming skills along with inferential thinking. YData is an introduction to Data Science that emphasizes the development of these skills while providing opportunities for hands-on experience and practice. YData is accessible to students with little or no background in computing, programming, or statistics, but is also engaging for more technically oriented students through extensive use of examples and hands-on data analysis. Python 3, a popular and widely used computing language, is the language used in this course. The computing materials will be hosted on a special purpose web server.  QR
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

PLSC 357a / EAST 310a / GLBL 309a, The Rise of ChinaStaff

Analysis of Chinese domestic and foreign politics, with a focus on the country’s rise as a major political and economic power. Topics include China's recent history, government, ruling party, technology, trade, military, diplomacy, and foreign policy.  SO0 Course cr
HTBA

* PLSC 358a, Comparative Political Parties and Electoral SystemsAndrea Aldrich

This course explores democratic representative through political parties around the world and the effects of electoral systems on party system development. In doing so, we critically examine the role of political parties in the representation of societal interests, party system evolution, the consequences of electoral law, and challenges facing modern political parties today with a particular focus on the growth of authoritarian and far right parties around the world. Prerequisite: It is helpful, although not mandatory, to have taken Intro to American Politics and Intro to Comparative Politics. A course on research design in the Social Sciences is also helpful.  SO
W 9:25am-11:15am

PLSC 359b / ECON 340b, Economics and Politics of DevelopmentGerard Padro

This course coves recent scholarship on the political economy of development. It starts with the study of macro-historical facts and move on to micro issues, such as conflict and corruption. Prerequisite: Intermediate microeconomics and Econometrics (ECON 117 or equivalent). 
TTh 9am-10:15am

* PLSC 374a / ECON 449a / EP&E 244a, The Economic Analysis of ConflictGerard Padro

In this course we apply microeconomic techniques, theoretical and empirical, to the analysis of internal violent conflict, including civil wars, terrorism and insurgencies, its causes and consequences. Topics include forced migration, ethnic conflict, long-term consequences of war and individual choices to participate in violence. Readings comprise frontier research papers and students will learn to critically engage with cutting-edge research designs. Prerequisites: Intermediate econometrics  SO
W 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 375a / GLBL 215a / LAST 386a / MGRK 237a / SOCY 389a, PopulismParis Aslanidis

Investigation of the populist phenomenon in party systems and the social movement arena. Conceptual, historical, and methodological analyses are supported by comparative assessments of various empirical instances in the US and around the world, from populist politicians such as Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, to populist social movements such as the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 376b / ER&M 376b / MGRK 304b / SOCY 307b, Extreme and Radical Right MovementsParis Aslanidis

Extreme and radical right movements and political parties are a recurrent phenomenon found in most parts of the world. Discussion of their foundational values and the causes of their continuous, even increasing, support among citizens and voters.    SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

PLSC 378a / AFAM 186a / LAST 214a / SOCY 170a, Contesting InjusticeStaff

Exploration of why, when, and how people organize collectively to challenge political, social, and economic injustice. Cross-national comparison of the extent, causes, and consequences of inequality. Analysis of mobilizations for social justice in both U.S. and international settings. Intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.  SO0 Course cr
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* PLSC 388a, Women, Firms, and the StateAudrey Latura

Is society organized between government and firms so as to maximize women's labor force participation and professional advancement? What distribution of public and private social benefits in the areas of work and family do we currently observe and how do we evaluate what is required to meet gender equality goals? How does women's private sector leadership impact their political leadership? This course explores these questions from the perspective of the contemporary welfare state in advanced economies and how it may help–or hinder–women's socioeconomic status. The course is divided thematically into three parts. In Part I, we begin with an overview of the political objectives of welfare state expansion to the social policy areas most likely to impact women: paid family leave, childcare, and workplace scheduling flexibility. We also consider the remaining policy and organizational obstacles to closing the gender pay and leadership gaps. In Part II, we explore how private firms have responded to these gaps by supplementing or complimenting the welfare state via employment-based social benefits and employee programs, particularly in countries with limited social spending. In addition, we look at how governments impact work-family decisions at the firm level. Finally, in Part III we consider firms as well-resourced political actors in their own right, what gender equality in corporate leadership means for firms' political activity, and what women's private sector leadership means for their potential political leadership.  SO
M 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 399a / EP&E 257a / LAST 251a, Political Power and Inequality in Latin AmericaAna De La O

Overview and analysis of politics in Latin America. The emergence of democracy and the forces that led to the unprecedented increase in inequality in the twentieth century. Topics include institutional design, historical legacies, corruption, clientelism, and violence.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 410a, Political ProtestsMaria Jose Hierro

The 2010s was the “decade of protest,” and 2019 capped this decade with an upsurge of protests all over the world. In 2020, amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, the US is witnessing the broadest protests in its history. What are the roots of these protests? Under what conditions does protest start? Why do people decide to join a protest? Under what conditions do protests succeed? Can repression kill protest movements? Focusing on recent protest movements across the world, this seminar addresses these, and other questions related to the study of political protest.   SO
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 415a / EP&E 241a / SOCY 172a, Religion and Politics in the WorldKatharine Baldwin

A broad overview of the relationship between religion and politics around the world, especially Christianity and Islam. Religions are considered to constitute not just theologies but also sets of institutions, networks, interests, and sub-cultures. The course’s principal aim is to understand how religion affects politics as an empirical matter, rather than to explore moral dimensions of this relationship.  SO
T 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 417b / EDST 282b, Comparative International EducationMira Debs

Around the world, education is one of the central institutions of society, developing the next generation of citizens, workers and individuals. How do countries balance these competing priorities? In which ways do countries converge on policies, or develop novel approaches to education? Through the course, students learn the a) impact of colonialism on contemporary education systems, b) the competing tensions of the demands of citizen and worker and c) how a variety of educational policies are impacted around the world and their impact on diverse populations of students. EDST 110 Foundations in Education Studies recommended.  WR, SO
Th 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 418a / EAST 408a, Japanese Politics and SocietyStaff

This class introduces students to 12 important puzzles about contemporary Japanese politics and society, discusses various ways in which scholars have attempted to solve these puzzles, and suggests pathways for future research. Together, we seek to explain public policy outcomes across a wide range of topics, including gender equality, nuclear energy, territorial disputes, population aging, and immigration. In the process, we learn (1) the important actors in Japanese politics (e.g., voters, politicians, parties, bureaucrats, and firms); (2) the positions that different actors take with respect to various policies, as well as the sources of these policy preferences; and (3) how political institutions block or enhance the representation of these actors’ interests.  SO
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 429a / AFST 385a / EP&E 350a / HIST 391Ja / HLTH 385a, Pandemics in Africa: From the Spanish Influenza to Covid-19Jonny Steinberg

The overarching aim of the course is to understand the unfolding Covid-19 pandemic in Africa in the context of a century of pandemics, their political and administrative management, the responses of ordinary people, and the lasting changes they wrought. The first eight meetings examine some of the best social science-literature on 20th-century African pandemics before Covid-19. From the Spanish Influenza to cholera to AIDS, to the misdiagnosis of yaws as syphilis, and tuberculosis as hereditary, the social-science literature can be assembled to ask a host of vital questions in political theory: on the limits of coercion, on the connection between political power and scientific expertise, between pandemic disease and political legitimacy, and pervasively, across all modern African epidemics, between infection and the politics of race. The remaining four meetings look at Covid-19. We chronicle the evolving responses of policymakers, scholars, religious leaders, opposition figures, and, to the extent that we can, ordinary people. The idea is to assemble sufficient information to facilitate a real-time study of thinking and deciding in times of radical uncertainty and to examine, too, the consequences of decisions on the course of events. There are of course so many moving parts: health systems, international political economy, finance, policing, and more. We also bring guests into the classroom, among them frontline actors in the current pandemic as well as veterans of previous pandemics well placed to share provisional comparative thinking. This last dimension is especially emphasized: the current period, studied in the light of a century of epidemic disease, affording us the opportunity to see path dependencies and novelties, the old and the new.  SO
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* PLSC 431a / GLBL 289a / HIST 245Ja, War and Peace in Northern IrelandBonnie Weir

Examination of theoretical and empirical literature in response to questions about the insurgency and uneasy peace in Northern Ireland following the peace agreement of 1998 which formally ended the three-decade long civil conflict known widely as The Troubles and was often lauded as the most successful of its kind in modern history. Consideration of how both the conflict and the peace have been messier and arguably more divisive than most outside observers realize.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

PLSC 438a, Applied Quantitative Research DesignStaff

Research designs are strategies to obtain empirical answers to theoretical questions. Research designs using quantitative data for social science questions are more important than ever. This class, intended for advanced students interested in social science research, trains students with best practices for designing and implementing rigorous quantitative research. We cover designs in causal inference, prediction, and missing data at a high level. This is a hands-on, application-oriented class. Exercises involve programming and statistics in addition to the social sciences (politics, economics, and policy). The final project advances a research question chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: Any statistics or data science course that teaches ordinary least squares regression. Past or concurrent experience with a programming language such as R is strongly recommended. Students with no prior R experience should plan on attending extra practice sessions in the first few weeks.   QR, SO0 Course cr
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* PLSC 442a / ECON 212a, Introduction to Political EconomyJohn Roemer

The course is an introduction to important economic ideas:  preferences and rationality, Pareto efficiency, economic equilibrium in a capitalist economy, externalities, the role of the state,  uncertainty and von Neumann-Morgenstern utility, the principle of insurance, elementary game theory (Nash equilibrium), the median voter theorem, political equilibrium with party competition, distributive justice, equality of opportunity,  and Arrow’s impossibility theorem. These topics are essential tools for political economists.  Prerequisite: One year of calculus or intermediate microeconomics with calculus.  SO
Th 9:25am-11:15am

* PLSC 445a / GLBL 244a, The Politics of FascismLauren Young

The subject of this course is fascism: its rise in Europe in the 1930s and deployment during the Second World War as a road map to understanding the resurgence of nationalism and populism in today’s political landscape, both in Europe and the United States. The course begins with an examination of the historic debates around fascism, nationalism, populism, and democracy. It then moves geographically through the 1930s and 1940s in Europe, looking specifically at Weimar Germany, Vichy France, the rise of fascism in England in the 1930s, and how fascist ideology was reflected in Italy’s colonial ambitions during the Abyssinian War. The course examines fascism and the implementation of racial theory and the example of anti-Semitism as an ideological and political tool. It also looks at the emergence of fascism in visual culture. The second part of the seminar turns to fascist ideology and the realities of today’s political world.  We examine the political considerations of building a democratic state, question the compromise between security and the preservation of civil liberties and look at the resurgence of populism and nationalism in Europe and the US. The course concludes by examining the role of globalization in contemporary political discourse.   SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

PLSC 452a / EP&E 203a / S&DS 102a, Introduction to Statistics: Political ScienceJonathan Reuning-Scherer

Statistical analysis of politics, elections, and political psychology. Problems presented with reference to a wide array of examples: public opinion, campaign finance, racially motivated crime, and public policy.  QR
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

PLSC 453a / EP&E 209a / S&DS 103a, Introduction to Statistics: Social SciencesJonathan Reuning-Scherer

Descriptive and inferential statistics applied to analysis of data from the social sciences. Introduction of concepts and skills for understanding and conducting quantitative research.  QR
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* PLSC 466b / HIST 268Jb / JDST 351b / RLST 324b, The Global Right: From the French Revolution to the American InsurrectionElli Stern

This seminar explores the history of right-wing political thought from the late eighteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the role played by religious and pagan traditions. This course seeks to answer the question, what constitutes the right? What are the central philosophical, religious, and pagan, principles of those groups associated with this designation? How have the core ideas of the right changed over time? We do this by examining primary tracts written by theologians, political philosophers, and social theorists as well as secondary literature written by scholars interrogating movements associated with the right in America, Europe, Middle East and Asia. Though touching on specific national political parties, institutions, and think tanks, its focus is on mapping the intellectual overlap and differences between various right-wing ideologies. While the course is limited to the modern period, it adopts a global perspective to better understand the full scope of right-wing politics.  HU, SO
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* PLSC 480a, One-Term Senior EssayDavid Simon

For seniors writing the senior essay who do not wish, or are unable, to write the essay in a department seminar. Students must receive the prior agreement of a member of the department who will serve as the senior essay adviser, and must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.
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* PLSC 490a, The Senior ColloquiumMaria Jose Hierro

Presentation and discussion of students' research proposals, with particular attention to choice of topic and research design. Each student frames the structure of the essay, chooses research methods, begins the research, and presents and discusses a draft of the introductory section of the essay. Enrollment limited to Political Science majors writing a yearlong senior essay.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 491a, The Senior EssayDavid Simon

Each student writing a yearlong senior essay establishes a regular consultation schedule with a department member who, working from the prospectus prepared for PLSC 490, advises the student about preparation of the essay and changes to successive drafts. Enrollment limited to Political Science majors writing a yearlong senior essay.
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