Aerospace Studies (USAF)

* USAF 101a, Heritage and Values of the U.S. Air Force IStaff

Introduction to the U.S. Air Force and how it works as a military institution, including an overview of its basic characteristics, missions, and organizations. Students attend one 50-minute lecture and one 110-minute laboratory each week. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
T 7:30am-8:20am

* USAF 201a, Team and Leadership Fundamentals IIStaff

This course focuses on laying the foundation for teamwork and leadership, particularly the skills that allow cadets to improve their leadership on a personal level and within a team. The course prepares cadets for their field training experience, where they are able to put the concepts learned into practice. The purpose of this course is to instill a leadership mindset and to motivate sophomore students to transition from AFROTC cadet to AFROTC officer candidate. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
T 8:30am-9:20am

* USAF 301a, Leading People and Effective Communication IHolly Hermes

Advanced study of leadership concepts and ethics, management and communication skills, and Air Force personnel and evaluation systems. Emphasis on the enhancement of leadership skills. Case studies and exercise of leadership and management techniques in a supervised environment. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
T 7:30am-10:30am

* USAF 411a, Foundations of American AirpowerGeorge Granholm

This course is an exploration of the evolution and employment of airpower in the United States military. The course is designed to give students an understanding of what role modern airpower plays in the use of national instruments of power; how American airpower has shaped U.S. grand strategy and vice versa. The course traces the development of airpower doctrine and strategy from World War I to modern day. Applications to deterrence theory, the role of technology, counterinsurgency/counterterrorism, and the “information revolution” are discussed. 
T 9:25am-11:15am