Ethnicity, Race, and Migration

Director of undergraduate studies: Zareena Grewal, 108 WLH, 436-8168, erm.yale.edu

The program in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration enables students to engage in an interdisciplinary, comparative study of forces that have created a multicultural, multiethnic, and multiracial world. The major emphasizes familiarity with the intellectual traditions and debates surrounding the concepts of indigeneity, ethnicity, nationality, and race; grounding in both the history of migration and its contemporary manifestations; and knowledge of and direct engagement with the cultures, structures, and peoples formed by these migrations.

Requirements of the Major

Students must complete twelve term courses in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, including the senior requirement. These twelve normally include ER&M 200, an introductory course on the issues and disciplines involved in the study of ethnicity, race, and migration. In the junior year, all majors are required to take ER&M 300, a seminar that introduces majors to scholarship in ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, and cultural studies. Students may take up to two courses required for the major in other departments, if the courses have content related to topics of ethnicity, race, and migration.

Area of concentration In consultation with the director of undergraduate studies (DUS), each student defines an area of concentration consisting of six term courses, one of which must be a methods course; these concentration courses do not include the senior essay or project. Advanced work in a language related to a student's area of concentration is advised. 

Credit/D/Fail No more than two courses taken Credit/D/Fail may be counted toward the major with permission of the DUS.

Roadmap See visual roadmap of the requirements.

Senior Requirement

There are two options for the senior requirement. Majors may choose a yearlong senior essay or project and take the senior colloquium (ER&M 491) on theoretical and methodological issues in the fall and then complete the requirement by writing a senior essay in the senior project seminar (ER&M 492) during the spring term. Alternatively, students may take two upper-level ER&M seminars, and in one of the seminars, with the instructor’s approval, write a final paper of 30–35 pages in addition to completing other course requirements. These seminars may be taken during either the fall or spring term. 

Advising

Prospective majors should consult the DUS early in their academic careers to discuss an individual plan of study. Enrollment in the major requires permission of the DUS prior to the beginning of the fall term of the junior year.

As a multidisciplinary program, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration draws on the resources of other departments and programs in the University. Students are encouraged to examine the offerings of other departments in both the humanities and the social sciences, interdisciplinary programs of study housed in the MacMillan Center and elsewhere, and Residential College Seminars for additional relevant courses. The stated area of concentration of each student determines the relevance and acceptability of other courses. Students are also encouraged to engage in community-based learning opportunities.

Study Abroad

Because of the major's emphasis on international and transnational work, students are encouraged to undertake a term abroad. They should consult with the DUS to identify courses from study abroad programs that may count toward the major.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 12 term courses (incl senior req)

Specific courses required ER&M 200, ER&M 300

Distribution of courses 6 courses in the area of concentration, 1 of which must be a methods course; 2 additional courses with ER&M content and DUS approval

Senior requirement Senior colloq (ER&M 491) and senior essay or project (ER&M 492); or senior essay in upper-level seminar and one additional upper-level seminar

Ethnic and racial conflicts and solidarities dominate much of the globe and give rise to international migration, displacement of indigenous peoples, and creation of new communities, as well as efforts of indigenous peoples to reclaim rights and territories.

The program in Ethnicity, Race, and Migration offers an introduction to the intellectual traditions and debates surrounding the concepts of ethnicity, nationality, and race; a grounding in both the history of migration and its contemporary manifestations; and a knowledge of the cultures, structures, and peoples formed by these migrations. Courses cover traditional ethnic studies topics such as Latino and Asian American studies; the major also encourages systematic study of the indigenous peoples of North America, migrations to North America, and comparative study of other intercontinental migrations.

During the first or sophomore year, students interested in the major should take ER&M 200, an introductory course on the issues and disciplines involved in the study of ethnicity, race, and migration.

FACULTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRAM OF ETHNICITY, RACE, AND MIGRATION

Professors Laura Barraclough (American Studies), Ned Blackhawk (History, American Studies), Hazel Carby (African American Studies, American Studies), Alicia Schmidt Camacho (Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, American Studies), Michael Denning (American Studies, English), Inderpal Grewal (American Studies, Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies), Matthew Jacobson (American Studies, African American Studies, History), Gilbert Joseph (History), Grace Kao (Sociology), Mary Lui (American Studies, History), Stephen Pitti (History, American Studies), Ana Ramos-Zayas (American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies)

Associate Professors Zareena Grewal (American Studies), Daniel Martínez HoSang (American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration), Daniel Magaziner (History)

Assistant Professors Albert Laguna (American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration), Sunny Xiang (English)

Lecturers Aaron Carico (American Studies, African American Studies), Leah Mirakhor (American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration), Joanna Radin (History of Science & Medicine, History, Anthropology, American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration), David Simon (Political Science), Quan Tran (American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration)

Visiting Lecturer Gary Okihiro​