Freshman Seminar Program

The Freshman Seminar program offers a diverse array of courses open only to freshmen and designed with freshmen in mind. Enrollment in seminars is limited to fifteen or eighteen students, depending on the nature of the course. Most seminars meet twice each week and do not, unless otherwise noted, presume any prior experience in the field. Students must apply and preregister for freshman seminars before the beginning of each term. To ensure that all applicants share an equal chance at enrolling in a seminar, students are admitted by lottery from among those who apply. Students who do not preregister may be considered for placement at the instructor's discretion if space is available. Information regarding application procedures may be found on the program's Web site.

Courses

* AFAM 008a / AFST 008a / HSAR 009a, Aesthetics and Meaning in African Arts and Cultures Erica James

The diversity of artistic production on the African continent, both historically and materially. The creative consciousness and aesthetic values of a variety of African cultures from ancient to contemporary times. Questions that arise when writing these histories without fully taking into account concepts of "African time." Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* AFAM 060b / AMST 060b / HIST 016b, Significance of American Slavery Edward Rugemer

The history of American slavery, its destruction during the nineteenth century, and its significance today. Topics include the origins of slavery, the development of racism, the transatlantic slave trade, the experience of enslavement, resistance to slavery, the abolitionist movement, the process of emancipation, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor in the twenty-first century. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* AMST 010b / ER&M 010b, Islam in the United States Zareena Grewal

Introduction to ethnic studies and ethnographic film and writing through the study of Islam in the United States. The wide variety of Muslim ethnic and racial and immigrant groups in the United States and the new forms of religious life that develop from their interaction. Global and universal elements of Islam; elements that are specific to place and community, including what is American about Islam in America. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* AMST 017b / ER&M 017b / WGSS 017b, Travel Literature of the Americas Dixa Ramirez

Evolving visions of the so-called New World from 1492 to the present. Readings from fictional and nonfictional accounts of travel to or throughout the Americas. Visual examples of travel narratives, including tourism ads; some attention to scholarly criticism. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* AMST 020a, The Humanities from Plato to the Corporate University James Berger

Inquiry into the relevancy of the humanities. Consideration of Plato’s dismissal of any study that could not clearly demonstrate its own truth and moral validity, as well as recent focus on the alleged technological obtuseness of the humanities. Debate as to whether academic studies and artistic pursuits, criticized as both anti-modern and postmodern, economically worthless, and politically harmful, can defend themselves. Examination of these debates, from Plato’s Academy to today’s corporate university. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* AMST 025a / WGSS 025a, The American Essay Tradition Greta LaFleur

Exploration of the American essay tradition, from some of its earliest moments to more recent iterations. Consideration of the essay as a rhetorical form, a political tool, and a literary tradition. Authors include Thomas Paine, Claudia Rankine, Benjamin Franklin, Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Cherrie Moraga, Sherman Alexie, and Hilton Als. Students will write political essays, as well as develop competencies in literary analysis. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* APHY 050a / PHYS 050a, Science of Modern Technology Daniel Prober

Examination of the science behind selected advances in modern technology. Focus on the scientific and contextual basis of each advance. Topics are developed by the participants with the instructor and with guest lecturers, and may include nanotechnology, quantum computation and cryptography, optical systems for communication and medical diagnostics, transistors, satellite imaging and global positioning systems, large-scale immunization, and DNA made to order. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SCRP

* ARCH 005a, Modern Architecture and the City Karla Britton

Issues in modern American architecture and urbanism examined through the work of prominent architects closely associated with Yale and New Haven. Perspectives on the character, development, and sociocultural consequences of building today. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* ART 003a, Blue Jessica Helfand

The cultural and iconic history of the color blue and its role as both a method and a motive for making work in the studio. The word "blue" and its etymological core, evocative connotations, colloquial nuance, and semantic role in different languages and cultures; scientific and sociological issues; blue in film and the fine arts. Projects experiment with writing, collecting, collage, and digital video. Use of materials from the Beinecke Library. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* ART 004a, Words and Pictures Halsey Rodman

Introduction to visual narration, the combination of words and pictures to tell a story. Narrative point of view, counternarrative and counterculture, visual satire, personal history, depictions of space and time, and strategies and politics of representation. Sources include illuminated manuscripts, biblical paintings, picture-stories, comic strips, and graphic novels. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HURP

* ART 006a, Art of the Printed Word Richard Rose

Introduction to the art and historical development of letterpress printing and to the evolution of private presses. Survey of hand printing; practical study of press operations using antique platen presses and the cylinder proof press. Material qualities of printed matter, connections between content and typographic form, and word/image relationships. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* ART 007b, Art of the Game Sarah Stevens-Morling

Introduction to interactive narrative through video game programming, computer animation, and virtual filmmaking. Topics include interactive storytelling, video game development and modification, animation, and virtual film production. Students produce a variety of works including web-based interactive narratives, collaboratively built video games, and short game-animated film production (machinima). Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

* ASTR 030a, Search for Extraterrestrial Life Michael Faison

Introduction to the search for extraterrestrial life. Review of current knowledge on the origins and evolution of life on Earth; applications to the search for life elsewhere in the universe. Discussion of what makes a planet habitable, how common these worlds are in the universe, and how we might search for them. Survey of past, current, and future searches for extraterrestrial intelligence. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, SC

* CLCV 020a, The Arts of Persuasion Egbert Bakker

Introduction to the theory and practice of rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome. Analysis of rhetoric's role in American history and society, using insights from the study of ancient rhetoric. Students write their own speeches to be delivered in class. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* CLCV 042b, Magic, Witchcraft, and Mystery Cults in Classical Antiquity Jessica Lamont

Exploration of evidence for magic, witchcraft, and the occult in Greco-Roman antiquity. Topics include theoretical approaches to magic, magical objects (curse tablets, voodoo dolls, and amulets), practitioners of magic (witches and sorcerers), magical spells, and charms. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* CLCV 065a / EDST 065a, Education and Learning in Antiquity Sarah Insley Say

Exploration of educational systems in antiquity, from ideals of education in the Athenian polis to the fusion of classical and Christian models of education in the later Roman Empire. Topics include pedagogical methods and texts, evolution of “school” as an institution, ancient theories of education, and the impact of ancient educational systems on society at large. Course readings combine recent scholarship on ancient education and primary sources in translation. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* CPSC 035b, Twenty-First Century Electronic and Computer Music Techniques Scott Petersen

Exploration of twenty-first century electronic and computer music through the diverse subjects and issues at the intersection of technology and new music. How computers have changed and challenged the analysis, composition, production, and appreciation of music over the last fifty years. Knowledge of basic music theory and the ability to read Western musical notation is assumed. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 

* CPSC 079b, Digital Photorealism Julie Dorsey

Basic methods used to define shapes, materials, and lighting when creating computer-generated images. Mathematical models for shape, texture models, and lighting techniques. Principles are applied through the use of modeling/rendering/animation software. Proficiency in high school–level mathematics is assumed. No previous programming experience necessary. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  QR

* EALL 050a, Imperial Pleasure Parks and Private Gardens of China Pauline Lin

Study of imperial parks and private gardens in China, focusing on five historic times, spanning from the second century CE to modernity. Topics include the rationales, philosophies, and economics of constructing gardens; their designs; depictions in paintings and literature; their impact on the Chinese cultural imagination; modern commercial recreations of earlier gardens and environmental art; and the changing uses of gardens through time. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program  HU

* ENGL 010b, Jane Austen Stefanie Markovits

Close study of Austen's novels, with special attention to the critique of social and literary convention. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
English: Pre-1900 Lit

* ENGL 015a / AFST 015a, South African Writing after Apartheid Stephanie Newell

An introduction to creative writing published in South Africa from the end of Apartheid in 1994 to the present. Close readings of contemporary fiction with additional material drawn from popular culture, including films, magazines, and music. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* ENGL 017b, Shakespeare's Major Tragedies David Kastan

Detailed exploration of Shakespeare's Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth. What makes the plays great in a way that almost all readers and audiences have recognized. The works as plays to be performed, as drama to be read, as texts that have been constructed by the activities of various people, and as plays deeply embedded in the history of their own moment, as well as in later histories for which they are in some part responsible. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
English: Pre-1800 Lit

* ENGL 018b, Sequels, Prequels, Reverberations, Revisions in Modern Literature Joseph Gordon

Close reading of novels, memoirs, and journalism from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how certain novelists have set about to rework fiction and nonfiction source materials to create new narrative. The significance of such artistic means as revising the setting, altering or questioning gender identity or sexual orientation of characters, or shifting the historical moment or political framework of the action. Exploration of how new works dispose the reader to reinterpret earlier works, providing a basis for redefining what constitutes originality in writing fiction. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* ENGL 020b / FILM 020b, Literature, Media, and Weather John Peters

Interdisciplinary overview of how weather serves as a topic of human imagination and invention across such domains as literature and science, philosophy and religion, painting and popular culture. The stories we tell about weather, the temperamental and nebulous materials of weather, and the media that helps us understand it and shape it. Readings include poems, prose, and academic articles. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   WR, HU

* F&ES 020a / EVST 020a, Sustainable Development in Haiti Gordon Geballe

The principles and practice of sustainable development explored in the context of Haiti's rich history and culture, as well as its current environmental and economic impoverishment. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR

* FILM 099a / LITR 099a, Film and the Arts Dudley Andrew

A study of cinema as it developed into a significant art form, including its interactions with fiction, theater, and painting. Focus on André Bazin's reflections on cinema in response to Chaplin, Welles, and Cocteau, as well as to writers such as Faulkner, Sartre, and Malraux. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HURP

* FREN 005a / HUMS 060a, Tragedy Christopher Semk

Exploration of representative works of tragedy from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century. The relationship between tragedy as a literary form and the tragic as a philosophical concept. Tragedy as a way to give meaning to catastrophe, trauma, and loss. The ethical and political implications of tragedy and the question of tragedy's relevance today. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* FREN 012a / LITR 020a, French Literature in Global Context Jill Jarvis

Introduction to contemporary French fiction in a global perspective. Close readings of prizewinning novels by writers of the former French Empire—in Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean—alongside key manifestos and theoretical essays that define or defy the notion of world literature. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* FREN 013b / HUMS 074b / LITR 011b, The Major Works of Albert Camus Alice Kaplan

An exploration of the major works—fiction, theater, political essays—of French writer Albert Camus (1913–1960). Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* G&G 010a / EVST 010a, Earth, Resources, Energy, and the Environment Mary-Louise Timmermans

Humankind's interactions with, and place within, the natural world. Plate tectonics and natural disasters, biological evolution and mass extinction, human evolution, population growth and ecology, industrial resources, groundwater and pollution, fossil fuels and energy transitions, the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases, paleoclimates, current global warming, alternative energies, and a planetary perspective on the Earth as a singular oasis in space. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC

* HIST 009a, The Viking Age Anders Winroth

Exploration of the ambiguous role of the Vikings in the history of the early Middle Ages. Focus both on the Vikings' impact in Europe (raids, trade, and settlement) and on developments in their Scandinavian homelands (Christianization and the creation of kingdoms). Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
History: Preindustrial

* HIST 033a / WGSS 033a, Fashion in London and Paris, 1750 to the Present Becky Conekin

Introduction to the history of Western fashion from the mid-eighteenth century to the present, with a focus on Paris and London. Approaches, methods, and theories scholars have historically employed to study fashion and dress. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* HIST 034a, Cuba from Slavery to Revolution Anne Eller

Cuba’s rich history from the early colonial period to the present. Topics include colonialism, slavery, independence, emancipation, the Cuban Revolution, and the nation's relationship with the United States. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* HIST 040a, Comparative Women's History Staff

Comparative perspective on the lives of women and their experiences, the ways in which historical forces shaped gender roles in different cultures, and the similarities and differences in gender roles across different time periods and around the world. Topics include work, family roles, political participation, health and sexuality, religious roles, and global feminisms.   WR, HU

* HIST 041b, The Americas in the Age of Revolutions Marcela Echeverri Munoz

The connections, contrasts, and legacies of revolutions in the British, French, and Spanish Atlantic empires in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Interactions between liberalism, black politics and antislavery, indigenous autonomy and citizenship, and revolutions in the Atlantic world between the 1760s and 1880s. Topics include the foundations of the Atlantic empires, strands of anticolonialism across the Americas, social aspects of the revolutionary movements, abolitionism and emancipation processes, and relations between the emergent American nations. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* HIST 055b, A History of Modern London Becky Conekin

Chronological and thematic exploration of modern London as a metropolitan and imperial center from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include race, gay rights, women's rights, consumer culture, the experience of war, and the development of a multi-racial society. The fashion, food, and popular music of London emerge as important components of the city's global identity in the twentieth century. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* HIST 072b, The History of World History Valerie Hansen

How the great historians of ancient Greece, Rome, China, the Islamic world, and nineteenth-century Europe created modern historical method. How to evaluate the reliability of sources, both primary and secondary, and assess the relationship between fact and interpretation. Using historical method to make sense of our world today. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HURP

* HIST 089a / HUMS 090a, Thinking about History Staff

An introduction to the discipline of history. Exploration of influential historical narratives; the philosophy of history; the emergence of historical subdisciplines including history from below, microhistory, the new cultural history, and Big History; and interdisciplinary engagement with anthropology, literary criticism, art history, and psychology. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* HLTH 081a, Current Issues in Medicine and Public Health Robert Bazell

Analysis of issues in public health and medicine that get extensive media attention and provoke policy debates. Topics include vaccination, the value of cancer screening and genetic testing, determinants of a healthy lifestyle, the U.S. role in global health, and the cost of health care. Enrollment limited to freshmen with a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement examination in Biology or the equivalent. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

* HSAR 013a / ER&M 014a, Photographing the Americas Monica Bravo

The history of photography in the Americas from its invention (or discovery) in 1839 to roughly 1940. Topics include its dissemination as both social documentation and artistic practice; image-making as mechanical rather than handmade art; assessment of the politics of deploying a new medium in a New World; and its historical and future power. Attention to questions of class, race, gender, and sexuality identity. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* HUMS 065a, Education and the Life Worth Living Matthew Croasmun and Ryan McAnnally-Linz

Consideration of education and what it has to do with real life—not just any life, but a life worth living. Engagement with three visions of different traditions of imagining the good life and of imagining education: Confucianism, Christianity, and Modernism. Students will be asked to challenge the fundamental question of the good life and to put that question at the heart of their college education. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* HUMS 071a, Intellectual Circles Charles Hill

Study of the creative interactions produced by informal associations of innovative minds in literature, philosophy, politics, science, psychology, the arts, war, and law. Courtiers, advisors, disciples, and disputers around Confucius, Socrates, Lincoln, Freud, Wittgenstein, and Niebuhr are among the circles considered. Groups include American Founders, quantum physicists, computer scientists, Gertrude Stein’s “Lost Generation” of Americans in Paris, “The Georgetown Set” of Cold War friends and rivals, and the Supreme Court.  HU

* HUMS 073b / LITR 087b, Uncertainty in Medicine Viewed through the Humanities William Sledge and Moira Fradinger

A survey that explores the rich conversation of science and humanistic study in experiences of uncertainty in medical practice. Professional relationships between doctor and patient examined through history, sociology, anthropology, literature, music and visual arts, and medical reflections.   Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* HUMS 076a / HSHM 007a, Epidemics in Global Perspective William Summers

Interaction of epidemic diseases and society. The response of government, medicine, and the public to the threat or actual presence of widespread contagious diseases. The notion of major epidemics as one of the key contingencies of history, critically examined through contemporary medical, political, and literary accounts. The changing responses of societies and governments to epidemics as well as the reasons for those responses. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU, SO

* HUMS 078a, Shakespeare and Music Judith Malafronte

The use of music in Shakespeare's plays, from the original stagings and seventeenth-century adaptations to modern productions. Consideration of operatic versions of the plays from the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Includes a field trip to New York City. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* HUMS 080b, Transforming Literature into Opera Judith Malafronte

Examination of ten operatic masterpieces and their literary source material, with consideration of the roles of the composer and the librettist in fashioning poems, short stories, and plays into operatic works. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* HUMS 092b / RLST 012b, Divine Law in Historical Perspective Staff

Exploration of the divergent notions of divine law in Greco-Roman antiquity and biblical Israel; the cognitive dissonance their historical encounter engendered and attempts by Jewish, Christian, and contemporary secular thinkers to negotiate competing claims. Topics include: debates over the attributes and nature of divine law versus human law; the grounds of divine law’s authority; law as a religious expression versus law as debasement of the divine-human relationship; the impact of divine law debates on secular legal theory. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* MB&B 050b, Topics in Cancer Biology Sandy Chang

Introduction to cancer as a genetic disease, with a focus on major discoveries in cancer biology that offer mechanistic insights into the disease process. A brief history of cancer; influence of the genomic revolution on cancer diagnostics; molecular defects underlying specific cancers; current and future cancer therapeutics. Patient case studies highlight specific molecular pathways and treatment strategies. Enrollment limited to freshmen with a strong background in biology and/or chemistry, typically demonstrated by a score of 5 on Advanced Placement examinations. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC

* MCDB 040b, The Science and Politics of Cancer Robert Bazell

Fundamentals of cell biology, Darwinian evolution, immunology, and genetics that underlie cancer; the history of cancer science and treatment; historical and current policy issues. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC

* MCDB 050a, Immunology and Microbes Paula Kavathas

Introduction to the immune system and its interaction with specific microbes. Attention both to microbes that cause illness, such as influenza, HIV, and HPV, and to microbes that live in harmony with humans, collectively called the microbiome. Readings include novels and historical works on diseases such as polio and AIDS. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SCRP

* MUSI 001b, Exploring the Nature of Genius Craig Wright

Defining genius, and investigation of that definition as a framework for changing attitudes about genius across Western cultural history. Chronological study of the lives of Leonardo, Shakespeare, Mozart, Newton, Einstein, van Gogh, Curie, Woolf, Tesla, and Picasso to identify the personal characteristics that enable genius. The contrast between genius and success, and why, or if, classification as a genius is desirable. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* MUSI 002a, The Role of the Performer in the Musical Experience Michael Friedmann

Various models of the role of the performer in the composer-performer-audience partnership that comprises the musical experience. Repertoire for case studies ranges from baroque to mid-twentieth-century works, and from solo (both vocal and instrumental) to chamber and orchestral works. Audio and video recordings are used to introduce concepts of interpretation, stylistic approaches associated with specific historical periods, the performer as intermediary for the composer's wishes, and the performer's use of repertoire as a platform for personal expression. Extensive listening exercises. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. Prerequisite: ability to read music.  HU

* MUSI 010b, Music and Diplomacy Rebekah Ahrendt

The history of music in cultural diplomacy, with a focus on theoretical frameworks that grew up around musical practices as a result of music's diplomatic functions. Scores, instruments, and performers mobilized in the service of diplomacy; the influence of past practices on contemporary policy; state-sponsored musical tours; diplomatic patronage; universal vs. national music, including the use of such labels to further diplomatic goals. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* NELC 001a / AFST 001a / ARCG 001a, Egypt and Northeast Africa: A Multidisciplinary Approach John Darnell

Examination of approximately 10,000 years of Nile Valley cultural history, with an introduction to the historical and archaeological study of Egypt and Nubia. Consideration of the Nile Valley as the meeting place of the cultures and societies of northeast Africa. Various written and visual sources are used, including the collections of the Peabody Museum and the Yale Art Gallery. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
WR, HU

* NELC 003a / HUMS 077a, Medieval Travel and Exploration Shawkat Toorawa

Introduction to the motivations for travel and exploration in the Middle Ages. For adventure, for commerce, on pilgrimage, and for conquest, travelers include Christian, Jewish, and Muslim merchants, ambassadors, scholars, geographers, explorers, sailors, and soldiers. All material in English translation. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* PLSC 030a, Law and the Limits of Freedom Alexander Rosas

This course evaluates the desired role of law in free and modern societies and dissects, more broadly, the relationship between law, the state, and the individual in such societies. Particularly, this course considers when, if ever, it is appropriate to use law to limit freedom in the name of equality, security, community, utility, and/or morality. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO

* RLST 015a / SAST 057a, Gods and Heroes in Indian Religions Phyllis Granoff

The basic doctrines and practices of India's three classical religions, Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism, explored through close reading of texts in translation. Lives of the founders, great monks, nuns, and lay followers of Buddhism and Jainism; myths of the major Hindu gods; heroines and goddesses in the three traditions. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* RLST 017a, Authenticity Noreen Khawaja

The origins of personal authenticity in Western thought and the impact of this idea on modern notions of truth, sincerity, and identity. The "true" self as a historical idea and as a social performance. Readings in philosophy, literature, and religious thought from antiquity to the present. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* RLST 022a, Religion and Science Fiction Maria Doerfler

Survey of contemporary science fiction with attention to its use and presentation of religious thought and practice. Focus on the ways in which different religious frameworks inform the literary imagination of this genre, and how science fiction in turn creates religious systems in both literature and society. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* RLST 025a, Scriptures Nancy Levene

Investigation of the idea of scripture through the study of texts that either are deemed scriptural by communities of readers or circulate with the mark or metaphor of scripture. The foci will be on the interpretation of textual significance and the relationship of the sacred and the secular. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* RUSS 022b, The Divine and the Human in Russian Fiction Vladimir Alexandrov

A study of major works by several of the greatest writers in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Bely, Nabokov, and Bulgakov. Primary attention to the ways the authors embody in their themes, devices, and forms the link between the human realm and the transcendent, a central preoccupation of Russian culture. Readings and discussion in English. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HUTr

* SCIE 030a and SCIE 031b, Current Topics in Science Douglas Kankel

A series of modules in lecture and discussion format addressing scientific issues arising in current affairs. Topics are selected for their scientific interest and contemporary relevance, and may include global warming, human cloning, and the existence of extrasolar planets. Credit for SCIE 030 upon completion of SCIE 031; one course credit is awarded for successful completion of the year's work. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC½ Course cr per term

* SOCY 018b, The Sociological Imagination Julia Adams

Introduction to the linked study of sociology and modernity. Topics include the dramatic rise of capitalism; colonialism and empire; the advent of democracy and bureaucracy; the world-historical invention of the individual; and the contested role of religion in modernity. Readings from classical and contemporary authors. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO

* SOCY 086a, China in the Age of Xi Jinping Deborah Davis

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China's recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy. May count toward the Sociology major as an intermediate course. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO

* SPAN 060a, Freshman Colloquium: Literary Studies in Spanish Noël Valis

Introduction to the study of literature in general and to some of the most important texts in Hispanic literature. Selected texts in Spanish include short stories, essays, lyric, and theater. Open to students who have placed into L5 courses. Counts toward the requirements of the Spanish major with permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  L5, HU

* WGSS 032b, History of Sexuality Maria Trumpler

Exploration of scientific and medical writings on sexuality over the past century. Focus on the tension between nature and culture in shaping theories, the construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality, the role of scientific studies in moral discourse, and the rise of sexology as a scientific discipline. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU