First-Year Seminar Program

The First-Year Seminar program offers a diverse array of courses open only to first-year students and designed with first-year students in mind. Enrollment in seminars is limited to fifteen or eighteen students, depending on the nature of the course. Most seminars meet twice each week and do not, unless otherwise noted, presume any prior experience in the field. Students must apply and preregister for first-year seminars before the beginning of each term. To ensure that all applicants share an equal chance at enrolling in a seminar, students are admitted by lottery from among those who apply. Students who do not preregister may be considered for placement at the instructor's discretion if space is available. Information regarding application procedures may be found on the program's website.

Courses

* ANTH 061b, Understanding Human OriginsJessica Thompson

This course deals with scientific questions of what we know about human origins and human evolution. It presents evidence from evolutionary and life history theory, geochronology, paleontology, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, phylogenetic analysis, genetics, archaeology, and functional morphology. It also tackles the issue of how we know what we think we know of our own ancestry over the past 6 million years. In other words, what constitutes evidence for human evolution and how is that evidence interpreted? Students are introduced to basic milestones in human evolution and learn how they have shaped us into the species we are today, using diverse lines of evidence from evolutionary and life history theory, geochronology, paleontology, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, phylogenetic analysis, genetics, archaeology, and functional morphology. We critically examine key debates that have taken place over the last century of exploration in human evolutionary research, learning how unconventional thinking and spectacular discoveries have shaped current knowledge of our origins. Students meet strange and fascinating historical characters, and then meet our fossil ancestors via the cast collection. Students also receive hands-on and interactive learning about the morphology, life history patterns, locomotion, social behavior, and diet of our nearest fossil relatives; observe living primates to assess what they can tell us about our own deep past; dive into data collection by locating real archaeological and fossil sites; and learn how molecular techniques such as ancient DNA have transformed understanding of the origins of our own species. By formally debating controversial issues with classmates, students learn what a surprising amount of information scientists can discern from fragmentary fossils, and are brought up to date with the most current discoveries in human evolution. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SO
T 2:30pm-3:45pm

* APHY 050a / PHYS 050a, Science of Modern Technology and Public PolicyDaniel Prober

Examination of the science behind selected advances in modern technology and implications for public policy, with focus on the scientific and contextual basis of each advance. Topics are developed by the participants with the instructor and with guest lecturers, and may include nanotechnology, quantum computation and cryptography, renewable energy technologies, optical systems for communication and medical diagnostics, transistors, satellite imaging and global positioning systems, large-scale immunization, and DNA made to order. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SCRP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ARCH 006a, Architectures of Urbanism: Thinking, Seeing, Writing the CityMichael Schlabs

What is architecture, and how is it conceived, relative to notions of the urban – to the broader, deeper, messier web of ideas, forms, and fantasies constituting “the city?” Can architecture play a role in defining the city, as such, or does the city’s political and social construction place it outside the scope of specifically architectural concerns? Likewise, what role can the city play in establishing, interrogating, and extrapolating the limits of architecture, whether as a practice, a discourse, or a physical manifestation of human endeavor in the material environment? This course addresses these and other related questions, seeking to position architecture in its broader urban, social, cultural, political, intellectual, and aesthetic contexts. In so doing, it assumes the position that the nature and character of the urban can largely be characterized in terms of the manner in which we, as a society, conceive, construct, and contribute to notions of “the public,” or “the common.” Prerequisite: general knowledge of 20th-century history.  HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* ART 004b, Words and PicturesHalsey Rodman

Introduction to visual narration, the combination of words and pictures to tell a story. Narrative point of view, counternarrative and counterculture, visual satire, personal history, depictions of space and time, and strategies and politics of representation. Sources include illuminated manuscripts, biblical paintings, picture-stories, comic strips, and graphic novels. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HURP
TTh 1:30pm-3:20pm

* ART 006a, Art of the Printed WordRichard Rose

Introduction to the art and historical development of letterpress printing and to the evolution of private presses. Survey of hand printing; practical study of press operations using antique platen presses and the cylinder proof press. Material qualities of printed matter, connections between content and typographic form, and word/image relationships. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
MW 1:30pm-3:20pm

* ART 011a, New Voices in PhotographyMatthew Leifheit

An introduction to the landscape of emerging and contemporary voices in the field of photography as contemporary art. Students are exposed to relevant conversations through visits by new and emerging curators, writers, publishers, and dealers as well as rising artists. The program of guests and visits to exhibitions is interlaced with a series of focused discussions and short lectures in the classroom, based on a schedule of assigned and recommended readings by new voices in art criticism and theory. Students read critical responses to photographs in publications both online and in print, and bring sources to share with the class. The course concludes with the production and circulation of a publication on a topic chosen by the class for the community at Yale and perhaps beyond. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HURP
M 3:30pm-5:30pm

* ART 012b, On Activism: The Visual Representation of Protest and DisruptionPamela Hovland

An introduction to the visual representations of protest, struggle, and revolution in this country from the Vietnam War to the present moment. The course explores a range of historically significant social and political movements, visual (communication) and dissemination strategies, and working methods. The primary goal of this studio-based course is to investigate and expand the designer/artist’s ability to express a point of view, transform contemporary understanding of local and national issues through a series of exercises, iterative making and experiments in distribution methods via solo and collaborative work. The students’ practice is supported by close readings, independent research, case studies, field trips, and presentations from a diverse collection of people directly involved in activism. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
Th 9:25am-11:45am

* ART 013a, Temperamental SpacesMarkus Schinwald

Spaces can sometimes appear as idiosyncratic as the people within them, taking on characteristics we usually ascribe to ourselves. They can appear erratic, comforting, uncanny–even threatening. Working like a therapy session for architecture, the body, and the objects around us, this seminar analyzes a diverse collection of readings and works, ranging from Renaissance mysticism to conceptual art and film, to explore how the visual arts have utilized a productive, but skeptical, relationship with space. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ART 014b, Research in the MakingKarin Schneider

Artistic research expands the research form to focus on haptic and tactile study of physical and historical objects. Through field trips to various special collections and libraries, including the Beinecke, the Yale Art Gallery, and the Map Collection, students respond to specific objects in the vast resources of Yale University. Group discussions, lectures, and critiques throughout the term help foster individual projects. Each student conducts research through the artistic mediums of drawing, photography, video, and audio, to slowly build an interconnected collection of research that is also an artwork.   Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

* ASTR 030b, Search for Extraterrestrial LifeMichael Faison

Introduction to the search for extraterrestrial life. Review of current knowledge on the origins and evolution of life on Earth; applications to the search for life elsewhere in the universe. Discussion of what makes a planet habitable, how common these worlds are in the universe, and how we might search for them. Survey of past, current, and future searches for extraterrestrial intelligence. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, SC
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* CLCV 045b, Authors and Readers After Antiquity: Reimagining Literature in the Postclassical WorldSarah Insley Say

What happened to literature in the Greco-Roman world after antiquity? This course seeks to engage a rich and varied literary tradition from the fourth to the sixth centuries, during a period of intense cultural transition and political change. Class sessions consider a variety of genres (travel literature, fiction writing, autobiography, and biography, etc.) and the unique contributions of the late antique Mediterranean in literary history. In the process, students grapple with “big questions” about the writing and reading of literature, and at the same time engage with a little-understood and exciting period of history and corpus of texts. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* CLCV 052a, The Myths of OedipusChristina Kraus

Study of different versions of the Oedipus myth, beginning with Sophocles' three plays (Oedipus the King, Antigone, and Oedipus at Colonus) and including modern adaptations such as those by Cocteau (The Infernal Machine), Fugard (The Island), and Dove (The Darker Face of the Earth); we also consider filmed adaptations such as Martha Grahame's "Night Journey" (1947), The Gospel at Colonus (1984), and Oedipo alcalde (1996). Secondary material, including works by cultural, psychological, and literary critics, provide background for the literary works. Readings, writing exercises, and discussion aim both to elucidate the original context of the plays in fifth-century Athens and to understand their contested and still vigorous place in the canon and in the western humanities.  All readings in English. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* CPSC 035b / MUSI 035b, Twenty-First Century Electronic and Computer Music TechniquesScott Petersen

Exploration of twenty-first century electronic and computer music through the diverse subjects and issues at the intersection of technology and new music. How computers have changed and challenged the analysis, composition, production, and appreciation of music over the last fifty years. Knowledge of basic music theory and the ability to read Western musical notation is assumed. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program. 
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

[ E&EB 050, The Evolution of Beauty ]

* ENGL 015a / AFAM 016a / AFST 015a, South African Writing after ApartheidStephanie Newell

An introduction to creative writing published in South Africa from the end of Apartheid in 1994 to the present. Close readings of contemporary fiction with additional material drawn from popular culture, including films, magazines, and music. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 021b, Fiction and ConsciousnessJonathan Kramnick

Study of literature and the representation of consciousness, focusing in particular on the novel, from Jane Austen to the present. What literature can tell us about the way minds work; how novels represent the felt experience of people going about their lives; how literature partners with other ways of understanding the mind, such as psychology and neuroscience. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 023b / HUMS 072b, Reading Recent North American Short FictionJoseph Gordon

The short story is generally considered to be North American in origin. As one of its goals, the course examines the ways in which the genre has developed in recent decades into a vehicle for storytelling from marginalized or subaltern voices such as those of people of color, women, LGBT people, immigrants and refugees, war veterans, students, and children. The course also explores how collections of stories gathered by a single author may resemble but yet be distinguishable from novels, and examines some very recent short stories that are influenced by nontraditional forms of imaginative writing, such as graphic fiction, self-help manuals, and social media. Authors are likely to include: Grace Paley, Alice Munro, Raymond Carver, Rohinton Mistry, ZZ Packer, Sherman Alexie, Tao Lin, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edward P. Jones, Elizabeth Strout, Junot Diaz, Phil Klay, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Alison Bechdel, Lorrie Moore, Jennifer Egan, and Teju Cole. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 024a, Suspense and NarrativeAnastasia Eccles

Exploration of suspense as a significant narrative mode and a historically conditioned feeling. Readings trace an arc from the rise of suspense in sentimental and Gothic fiction in the eighteenth century, through its preeminence in the nineteenth-century novel, to its consolidation as a marketable genre in the twentieth century. With brief supplemental readings in the philosophy of aesthetics and narrative theory. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* ENGL 025a / LITR 023a / SAST 059a, Modern South Asian Literature, 1857-2017Priyasha Mukhopadhyay

Exploration of literary texts from South Asia, 1857 to the present. Close reading of literary texts from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, alongside political speeches, autobiographies, and oral narratives. Topics include colonialism, history writing, migration, language, caste, gender and desire, translation, politics and the novel. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration is required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 026b, Poetics of Place: Literature in/of ConnecticutAlanna Hickey

This course investigates the ways literature structures our encounter with our surroundings in both obvious and imperceptible ways, settling into the literary past and present of Connecticut. Inquiries span the role of narrative in our comprehension of place, the persistence of particular historical accounts at the expense of others, and our ethical obligation to the territories we survive upon. Readings include Indigenous texts, political documents, nature writing, dystopic fiction, ecocriticism, and travel memoir. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* EVST 007a, The New England ForestMarlyse Duguid

Exploration of the natural history of southern New England, with specific focus on areas in and around New Haven. Pertinent environmental issues, such as climate change, endangered species, and the role of glacial and human history in shaping vegetative patterns and processes, are approached from a multi-disciplinary framework and within the context of the surrounding landscape.  Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 
Th 1pm-5pm

* EVST 020a / F&ES 020a, Sustainable Development in HaitiGordon Geballe

The principles and practice of sustainable development explored in the context of Haiti's rich history and culture, as well as its current environmental and economic impoverishment. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR
HTBA

* EVST 040a, Collections of the Peabody MuseumDavid Skelly

Exploration of scientific questions through the study and analysis of objects within the Peabody Museum's collections. Formulating a research question and carrying out a project that addresses it are the core activities of the course. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* EVST 050b, The Human Population ExplosionRobert Wyman

The world adds a billion people every dozen years. If childbearing stays at its current unprecedented low – population will quadruple by 2100. Whether one is concerned about human poverty, health and well-being, or the environment, the continuing population explosion looms as a dominant factor. The nexus of deep poverty and increasing population derails many efforts at human and economic development. The increasing human environmental footprint overwhelms efforts at conservation. The introduction of family planning around the world and the fall in global fertility that it has allowed is one of the great revolutions in human history. This seminar introduces the biological, historical, economic, and cultural factors that determine human population growth. Starting with an evolutionary background, we trace the historical stages of population growth and how cultures have maintained reproduction at a sustainable rate and how the modern decline of mortality led to the population explosion. We probe the effects of large and high-consuming populations and efforts to re-stabilize population. Topics include the political, religious, and ethical issues surrounding fertility: infanticide, abortion, contraception, son preference, government coercion, migration, and the status of women. Many topics are highly controversial and students are encouraged to present a diverse set of views. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

* FREN 096b, Women's Narratives of Self in Modern French LiteratureMaryam Sanjabi

The course explores women's autobiographical literature, demonstrating their uniqueness from an individual perspective and capturing the social, economic, religious, and ethnic themes of the period and their authors' intellectual standpoints. The selected books represent a variety of literary genres ranging from memoir to journal, graphic novel, and film scripts with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries as they appear in the works of: Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Nathalie Sarraute, Lucie Aubrac, Hélène Berr, Assia Djebar, Ken Bugul, Agnès Varda, Marjane Satrapi, Marguerite Duras, Annie Ernaux, and Camille Laurens among others. This course thus aims at a critical awareness of what modernity has meant in women's experiences and why debate about its consequences often revolves around women's lives. While some authors explore the coming of age of European gender awareness, others deal with the war and resistance and more recent non-Western voices in French pose the question of identity of the “Other.” Course readings include short theoretical essays and a number of secondary works. Conducted in French and English. Papers in French or in English. Readings in French. There is no prerequisite, but students who took FREN 170 or an equivalent will feel comfortable. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* FILM 099a / LITR 099a, Film and the ArtsDudley Andrew

A study of cinema as it developed into a significant art form, including its interactions with fiction, theater, and painting. Focus on André Bazin's reflections on cinema in response to Chaplin, Welles, and Cocteau, as well as to writers such as Faulkner, Sartre, and Malraux. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HURP
MW 1pm-2:15pm, M 6:30pm-9pm

* FREN 090a, A Fashionable LiteratureChristophe Schuwey

The golden age of Versailles, the French Grand Siècle, was also the reign of fashion. Literature was no exception, and to seduce and reach out to the audience, playwrights, poets, and novelists constantly adapted to the newest trends, captured the hottest topics, and published innovative works. The clever and most skillful of them became true stars and generated general applause—or scandals. This seminar explores the turning point when French literature took a shape of entertainment. How did authors write about current events and topics? How did literature and media start new fashion and build celebrity? What criticism did it raise? The readings allow students to explore major works of the period as well as the origin of cultural hierarchies that are still relevant today. Authors include: Corneille, La Fayette, Sévigné, La Bruyère, Molière, Murat, and Racine. No French Required.  Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program. 
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* G&G 010a / EVST 010a, Earth, Resources, Energy, and the EnvironmentMary-Louise Timmermans

Humankind's interactions with, and place within, the natural world. Plate tectonics and natural disasters, biological evolution and mass extinction, human evolution, population growth and ecology, industrial resources, groundwater and pollution, fossil fuels and energy transitions, the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases, paleoclimates, current global warming, alternative energies, and a planetary perspective on the Earth as a singular oasis in space. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* HIST 002a, Myth, Legend, and History in New EnglandMark Peterson

This seminar explores the complex and multi-faceted process of remembering and representing the past, using the New England region as our laboratory and drawing on the resources of Yale and the surrounding region for our tools.  Human events are evanescent—as soon as they happen, they disappear.  Yet they live on in many forms, embodied in physical artifacts and the built environment, converted to songs, stories, and legends, inscribed in written records of a thousand sorts, depicted in graphic images from paintings and sketches to digital photographs and video.  From these many sources people form and reform their understanding of the past.  In this seminar, we examine a series of iconic events and patterns deeply embedded in New England’s past and analyze the contested processes whereby historians, artists, poets, novelists, and other “remembrancers” of the past have attempted to do this essential work. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* HIST 015b, History of Food and CuisinePaul Freedman

The history of food from the Middle Ages to the present, with a focus on the United States and Europe. How societies gathered and prepared food; culinary tastes of different times and places. The influence of taste on trade, colonization, and cultural exchange. The impact of immigration, globalization, and technology on food. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 019b / AMST 028b, The History of the Book in the American West

This course focuses on the history of making, selling, buying, collecting, and reading printed objects in America by focusing especially on western United States. We focus not only on the history of print in the American West, but also on the representation of the American West in print. As a regional examination of the history of the book, this course investigates the historical development of the business models and technologies by which printed materials were created and circulated after about 1790. It examines the social and cultural histories of authorship and reading, both learned and popular. This course also pays particular attention to cultural production of Western Americana as a relatively finite number of collectible materials through the creation of influential lists like the Zamorano 80. Yale alumni have played an outsized role in that historical process, and so this class intersects significantly with the institutional history of this institution. Through conversations with rare book sellers and collectors—and perhaps a field trip or two—students learn about the antiquarian book trade. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 022a, What History TeachesJohn Gaddis

An introduction to the discipline of history. History viewed as an art, a science, and something in between; differences between fact, interpretation, and consensus; history as a predictor of future events. Focus on issues such as the interdependence of variables, causation and verification, the role of individuals, and to what extent historical inquiry can or should be a moral enterprise.  WR, HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 025b, Painting and HistoryNoah Gentele

Exploration of how imaginative artworks and archival sources engage in a common effort to make sense of the past. Topical focus on Britain and France in the nineteenth century, as well as American art of the mid-twentieth century. Consideration of how the tools of visual analysis can aid in the study of historical change and how the understanding of historical events can illuminate the complexities of fine art. Painters including West, David, Blake, Ingres, Turner, Manet, Rossetti, Whistler, Seurat, Redon, Newman, Noland, and Pollock. Multiple visits to galleries and archives. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HIST 033a / WGSS 033a, Fashion in London and Paris, 1750 to the PresentBecky Conekin

Introduction to the history of Western fashion from the mid-eighteenth century to the present, with a focus on Paris and London. Approaches, methods, and theories scholars have historically employed to study fashion and dress. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 036a, Utopia and Dystopia: From Classic Times to the Present in Western CultureMaría Jordán

We live in a time of dysfunctional societies but, at the same time, in a moment of ecological, egalitarian, and tolerant societies. In this class we examine utopian ideas from Antiquity to the present in Western societies, and compare them with the ones that we formulate in our days. Also, we examine the correlation between dystopias and utopias. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
TTh 9am-10:15am

* HIST 040a, Comparative Women's HistoryRebecca Tannenbaum

Comparative perspective on the lives of women and their experiences, the ways in which historical forces shaped gender roles in different cultures, and the similarities and differences in gender roles across different time periods and around the world. Topics include work, family roles, political participation, health and sexuality, religious roles, and global feminisms.   WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 041a, The Americas in the Age of RevolutionsMarcela Echeverri Munoz

The connections, contrasts, and legacies of revolutions in the British, French, and Spanish Atlantic empires in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Interactions between liberalism, black politics and antislavery, indigenous autonomy and citizenship, and revolutions in the Atlantic world between the 1760s and 1880s. Topics include the foundations of the Atlantic empires, strands of anticolonialism across the Americas, social aspects of the revolutionary movements, abolitionism and emancipation processes, and relations between the emergent American nations. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HIST 049b, American Business HistorySamuel Milner

A first-year seminar that uses the case method to provide an overview of the evolution of business over the span of American history. Major themes include: the importance of corporate organization and structure to the pursuit of strategic objectives; the ability of entrepreneurs to adapt to new technology; and how firms have responded to domestic and foreign competition. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 9am-10:15am

* HIST 055b, A History of Modern LondonBecky Conekin

Chronological and thematic exploration of modern London as a metropolitan and imperial center from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include race, gay rights, women's rights, consumer culture, the experience of war, and the development of a multi-racial society. The fashion, food, and popular music of London emerge as important components of the city's global identity in the twentieth century. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 072b, The History of World HistoryValerie Hansen

How the great historians of ancient Greece, Rome, China, the Islamic world, and nineteenth-century Europe created modern historical method. How to evaluate the reliability of sources, both primary and secondary, and assess the relationship between fact and interpretation. Using historical method to make sense of our world today. Strategies for improving reading, writing, and public speaking skills. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 080a, The Vietnam WarsDavid Engerman

Exploration of the history of twentieth-century wars in Vietnam, including but not limited to the "American War." Through course readings and independent research, students examine the nature of Vietnamese colonial experience, the post-World War II settlement, and the growing anti-colonial conflict that had a dramatic impact on Vietnam, the United States, and the world. Students use fictional accounts, documentaries, and news reports as well as historians’ writings to deepen their knowledge of the Vietnam Wars, at the same time using these sources to contemplate how historians write history—and how all of us understand the past.  Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* HIST 081b / MMES 080b, Nationalist Myths in the Modern Middle EastLauren Banko

This course introduces students to the myth-making processes involved in the creation of nation-states in the post-Ottoman Middle East, including Iraq, Palestine, Israel, Lebanon, Turkey, as well as in Iran and Egypt. It explores the ways in which national identities and nation-states formed—in ways both organic and forced—around certain myths and ideologies. It examines the impact of these national/nationalist myths on revolutions and uprisings in the late Ottoman and post-Ottoman Middle East. The course readings, sources, and discussions examine the relationship between myths of national origin, revolution, and state-making. The class also addresses the ways in which the control over the creation of myths of origin and ethnic, racial, national, and religious identity shaped society and politics in nation-states, republics, and monarchies especially after 1918. The course focuses partly on the theoretical underpinnings of national myth-making and ideologies of nationalism in order to offer historical understandings as to how states, majority and minority groups, and different national movements in post-Ottoman society created and re-made ‘imagined communities’ of nationals and citizens, sometimes through violence. The course surveys the ways in which new identities became manifested in a number of often-revolutionary ideologies including pan-Arab nationalism, Zionism, Kemalism, Phoenicianism, Baathist socialism, and various anti-imperial and anti-colonial movements. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HIST 089b / HUMS 090b, Thinking about HistoryStuart Semmel

An introduction to the discipline of history. Exploration of influential historical narratives; the philosophy of history; the emergence of historical subdisciplines including history from below, microhistory, the new cultural history, and Big History; and interdisciplinary engagement with anthropology, literary criticism, art history, and psychology. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 090b, The History of SportAngela Gleason

Sport has been called both the new world religion and the modern global language. Despite this, modern sport remains one of the least examined aspects of social history. This seminar examines the history of modern American sport from the mid-19th century through the 21st century. Regular discussion themes include race, identity, gender, religion, nationalism, commercialism, professionalism, drugs, technology, and whatever else we decide. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
WF 9am-10:15am

* HLTH 081a, Current Issues in Medicine and Public HealthRobert Bazell

Analysis of issues in public health and medicine that get extensive media attention and provoke policy debates. Topics include vaccination, the value of cancer screening and genetic testing, determinants of a healthy lifestyle, the U.S. role in global health, and the cost of health care. Enrollment limited to freshmen with a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement examination in Biology or the equivalent. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HSAR 007a, Art and ScienceCarol Armstrong

The historical relationship between art and science in the West, from the Renaissance to the present. Case studies illustrate the similarities and differences between the way artists and scientists each model the world, in the studio and the laboratory.
Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required. Please go to the following website to enter preferences for seminars: https://students.yale.edu/ocs-preference/select/select?id=2041  WR, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HSAR 010b, The Classical Tradition: from Roman to Renaissance ArtFelicity Harley

The influence of classical Greco-Roman antiquity on early Christian, medieval, and Italian Renaissance art explored through study of objects in the Yale Art Gallery (statuary, coins, textiles, gems, and paintings). Topics include: the lure of antiquities; collecting and birth of the museum; naturalism and nudity; sculpture and iconophobia; religion and iconoclasm; iconographic models of paradise, beauty, power, and authority; and patronage and propaganda. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HSAR 015a / SAST 060a, Ten Indian ObjectsSubhashini Kaligotla

A 5000-year-old stone seal, a 20th century comic book, an emperor’s painted portrait, a processional bronze god, a miniature temple, an inscribed pillar, a rock crystal reliquary, a serene Buddha, an animated film, and a towering female figure. Through rigorous explorations of these ten objects from South Asia this seminar teaches close looking, vivid writing, and narrating history through things. It considers both the biographies of the objects and their involvement in the wider social, political, artistic, and cultural histories of the Indian subcontinent. Students engage some of the most exciting scholarship in the field of South Asian art, and observe, draw, and write about things in museums and art collections on a weekly basis. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* HUMS 064a, Humanistic Considerations in the Doctor Patient RelationshipWilliam Sledge

This first-year seminar addresses considerations in the doctor/patient relationship as medicine itself faces the corporatization of health care and the need to develop clear approaches to the humanistic elements of health care. We address the history of the relationship between MDs and their patients as a prelude to a more in-depth account of medicine and patients in modern times. We use the work of notable sociologists (Parsons and Fox) as well as artists and humanist physicians. We also interrogate alternative to western medicine as we review the art and literature of the modern era to gain a humanistic perspective on medicine, illness, suffering, and the administration of care. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU, SO
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HUMS 072b / ENGL 023b, Reading Recent North American Short FictionJoseph Gordon

The short story is generally considered to be North American in origin. As one of its goals, the course examines the ways in which the genre has developed in recent decades into a vehicle for storytelling from marginalized or subaltern voices such as those of people of color, women, LGBT people, immigrants and refugees, war veterans, students, and children. The course also explores how collections of stories gathered by a single author may resemble but yet be distinguishable from novels, and examines some very recent short stories that are influenced by nontraditional forms of imaginative writing, such as graphic fiction, self-help manuals, and social media. Authors are likely to include: Grace Paley, Alice Munro, Raymond Carver, Rohinton Mistry, ZZ Packer, Sherman Alexie, Tao Lin, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edward P. Jones, Elizabeth Strout, Junot Diaz, Phil Klay, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Alison Bechdel, Lorrie Moore, Jennifer Egan, and Teju Cole. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* HUMS 075a, Mastering the Art of WatercolorAdam Van Doren

An introductory course on the art of watercolor as a humanistic discipline within the liberal arts tradition. Readings, discussions, and studio work emphasize critical, creative thinking through a tactile, “learning by doing” study of the watercolor medium. Students analyze and imitate the classic techniques of J. M.W. Turner, John Singer Sargent, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Edward Hopper, among others. Studio components include painting en plein air to understand color, form, perspective, composition, and shade and shadow. Basic drawing skills recommended. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HURP
W 2:30pm-5:30pm

* HUMS 078b, Shakespeare and MusicJudith Malafronte

The use of music in Shakespeare's plays, from the original stagings and seventeenth-century adaptations to modern productions. Consideration of operatic versions of the plays from the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Includes a field trip to New York City. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HUMS 080a, Transforming Literature into OperaJudith Malafronte

Examination of ten operatic masterpieces and their literary source material, with consideration of the roles of the composer and the librettist in fashioning poems, short stories, and plays into operatic works. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
MF 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HUMS 090b / HIST 089b, Thinking about HistoryStuart Semmel

An introduction to the discipline of history. Exploration of influential historical narratives; the philosophy of history; the emergence of historical subdisciplines including history from below, microhistory, the new cultural history, and Big History; and interdisciplinary engagement with anthropology, literary criticism, art history, and psychology. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HUMS 092b / RLST 012b, Divine Law in Historical PerspectiveChristine Hayes

Exploration of the divergent notions of divine law in Greco-Roman antiquity and biblical Israel; the cognitive dissonance their historical encounter engendered and attempts by Jewish, Christian, and contemporary secular thinkers to negotiate competing claims. Topics include: debates over the attributes and nature of divine law versus human law; the grounds of divine law’s authority; law as a religious expression versus law as debasement of the divine-human relationship; the impact of divine law debates on secular legal theory. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* MB&B 050b, Topics in Cancer BiologySandy Chang

Introduction to cancer as a genetic disease, with a focus on major discoveries in cancer biology that offer mechanistic insights into the disease process. A brief history of cancer; influence of the genomic revolution on cancer diagnostics; molecular defects underlying specific cancers; current and future cancer therapeutics. Patient case studies highlight specific molecular pathways and treatment strategies. Enrollment limited to first-year students with a strong background in biology and/or chemistry, typically demonstrated by a score of 5 on Advanced Placement examinations. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, SC
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* MB&B 060a, Molecular MedicineSandy Chang

The main purpose of this course is to use benign and malignant hematological disorders to introduce fundamental concepts in molecular and cellular biology. Students emerge from this course with a firm understanding of the molecular pathways perturbed in various hematological disorders and the therapeutics currently used to exploit these pathways for disease treatment. Through lectures and reading of primary scientific literature, students learn about landmark discoveries in hematology and how these discoveries contribute to understanding of the normal hematopoietic system, and when perturbed, how diseases arise. Students also learn to (1) read primary scientific literature, (2) synthesize this material to present to the class and (3) learn how to write a short grant proposal. These skills are essential for any successful scientist or physician, and it’s important to master them early. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  Prerequisite: score of 5 on the AP Biology exam or AP Chemistry exam.  WR, SC
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* MCDB 040b, The Science and Politics of CancerRobert Bazell

Fundamentals of cell biology, Darwinian evolution, immunology, and genetics that underlie cancer; the history of cancer science and treatment; historical and current policy issues. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* MCDB 050a, Immunology and MicrobesPaula Kavathas

Introduction to the immune system and its interaction with specific microbes. Attention both to microbes that cause illness, such as influenza, HIV, and HPV, and to microbes that live in harmony with humans, collectively called the microbiome. Readings include novels and historical works on diseases such as polio and AIDS. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SCRP
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* MCDB 065a, The Science and Politics of HIV/AIDSRobert Bazell

Study of the basic virology and immunology of HIV/AIDS, along with its extraordinary historical and social effects. Issues include the threat of new epidemics emerging from a changing global environment; the potential harm of conspiracy theories based on false science; and how stigmas associated with poverty, gender inequality, sexual preference, and race facilitate an ongoing epidemic. For all first-year students regardless of whether they are considering a science major. Prerequisite: AP Biology or equivalent. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   SC
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MUSI 007a, NoiseBrian Kane

The topic of noise as an introduction to the problems of sound and signification. The surplus of information in white noise, and the meaning perceived when noise is filtered. Contexts in which noise has become filtered for political and aesthetic ends. Topics include sound poetry, literature, electronic music, noise pollution, and consumption.Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* NELC 001b / AFST 001b / ARCG 001b, Egypt and Northeast Africa: A Multidisciplinary ApproachJohn Darnell

Examination of approximately 10,000 years of Nile Valley cultural history, with an introduction to the historical and archaeological study of Egypt and Nubia. Consideration of the Nile Valley as the meeting place of the cultures and societies of northeast Africa. Various written and visual sources are used, including the collections of the Peabody Museum and the Yale Art Gallery. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* NELC 003a / HUMS 077a, Medieval Travel and ExplorationShawkat Toorawa

Introduction to the motivations for travel and exploration in the Middle Ages. For adventure, for commerce, on pilgrimage, and for conquest, travelers include Christian, Jewish, and Muslim merchants, ambassadors, scholars, geographers, explorers, sailors, and soldiers. All material in English translation. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PHIL 088a, The Philosophy of Transformative ExperienceLaurie Paul

Going to college, fighting in a war, having a baby, being spiritually reborn, betraying your lover, emigrating to a new country—all of these are experiences that can transform you. By transforming you, they change you, and in the process, they can restructure the nature and meaning of your life. Exploring the epistemic structure of transformation can help us to understand the special and distinctive ways that new experiences can form and change us, and how this relates to how we make life choices, both big and small. This course explores the philosophical concept of transformative experience, focusing on the many ways this concept fits with contemporary philosophical issues in epistemology and metaphysics. We also explore connections to current research in psychology, cognitive science, and behavioral economics on empathy, morality, choice, and the self, in conjunction with discussions of the way that many real world experiences can be transformative.  Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* PHIL 091a, Philosophy of GamesMark Maxwell

In this class, we critically discuss a variety of puzzles that arise when thinking about games. Just what are games, anyway? And, how can thinking in terms of games help us understand the world? The notion of 'game' is a topic of interest in its own right, but games can also serve as as a model and metaphor for other parts of the world, including life as a whole and the exploration of other philosophical debates. As such, the study of games serves as an entry point to a number of topics of potential interest, rather than just an in-depth study of one topic. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* PHYS 040a / ASTR 040, Expanding Ideas of Time and SpaceC. Megan Urry

Discussions on the nature of time and space. Topics include the shape and contents of the universe, special and general relativity, dark and light matter, and dark energy. Observations and ideas fundamental to astronomers' current model of an expanding and accelerating four-dimensional universe. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* PHYS 045b, Physics Meets the ArtsAgnes Mocsy

This seminar provides an opportunity to acquire a basic understanding of fundamental and contemporary physics topics curated as stories infused with the arts, emphasis is placed on science as a process rather than an outcome. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* PLSC 027a, From Protest to Power: Social Movements in Comparative PerspectiveLeanna Barlow

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of the social movement as a form of collective action. Social movements, at heart, aim to bring about political, economic, or cultural change. From the American Civil Rights Movement to the formation of Transnational Advocacy Networks, social movements have shaped the contemporary political landscape in countries all over the world. This course draws on a range of historical and contemporary case studies to examine social movements in a comparative perspective. Key questions include: Why do movements occur, who participates, what strategies or tactics are used, how do institutions respond, and what is the impact of collective action? Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

* PLSC 028a, American Constitutionalism: Power and its LimitsGordon Silverstein

What happens when a modern superpower tries to govern itself under an 18th Century Constitution? Using original documents, contemporaneous books, and U.S. Supreme Court cases, this course explores the debates that have defined America's struggle to live up to its sometimes conflicting commitments to liberty, equality and the consent of the governed. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* PLSC 030a, Law and the Limits of FreedomAlexander Rosas

This course evaluates the desired role of law in free and modern societies and dissects, more broadly, the relationship between law, the state, and the individual in such societies. Particularly, this course considers when, if ever, it is appropriate to use law to limit freedom in the name of equality, security, community, utility, and/or morality. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO
MW 9am-10:15am

* RLST 017a, AuthenticityNoreen Khawaja

The origins of personal authenticity in Western thought and the impact of this idea on modern notions of truth, sincerity, and identity. The "true" self as a historical idea and as a social performance. Readings in philosophy, literature, and religious thought from antiquity to the present. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* SCIE 030a and SCIE 031b, Current Topics in ScienceDouglas Kankel

A series of modules in lecture and discussion format addressing scientific issues arising in current affairs. Topics are selected for their scientific interest and contemporary relevance, and may include global warming, human cloning, and the existence of extrasolar planets. Credit for SCIE 030 upon completion of SCIE 031; one course credit is awarded for successful completion of the year's work. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  SC½ Course cr per term
F 1:30pm-3pm

* SOCY 031a, Conservative Politics in a Time of "Fake News" and Irrelevant TruthsIan Mullins

The 2016 United States presidential election has raised urgent questions about the role knowledge plays in conservative politics. Scholars are turning their attention to the proliferation of "fake news" on the internet and what might be a new era of post-truth politics in the United States. This course investigates the lineage of conservative politics that is instrumental to the present state of U.S. politics. Students learn about the history of the conservative movement and the Republican Party, as well as sociological approaches that will help them better understand the role of truth and knowledge in conservative politics today,  SO
TTh 9am-10:15am

* SPAN 060a, First-Year Colloquium: Literary Studies in SpanishNoël Valis

Introduction to the study of literature in general and to some of the most important texts in Hispanic literature. Selected texts in Spanish include short stories, essays, lyric, and theater. Open to students who have placed into L5 courses. Counts toward the requirements of the Spanish major with permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  L5, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* THST 095b, The Process of New Play Development in American TheaterHal Brooks

How does a play move from concept to page to production? What are the steps involved along the way? What are the techniques within each phase that playwrights, directors, and actors utilize towards developing a play? This course seeks to show potential theater studies majors the practical aspects of new play development beyond the role of actor. Students are introduced to voices and stories that have recently emerged, treating the script more as a fluid blueprint rather than an unchangeable text. Students will analyze and compare various versions of a playscripts through reading, staging and discussion. Each student will explore texts through the eyes of directors, playwrights, actors, designers and dramaturgs - and will at times adopt those roles within exercises. The course will highlight the last fifteen years in American theater which has seen an unprecedented explosion of new plays, playwrights and new play development incubators. Works by playwrights Will Eno, Annie Baker, Danai Gurira, Sarah Ruhl, Branden Jennings-Jacobs and Sam Hunter will be investigated, analyzed, and explored.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* THST 097a, Anatomy in MotionBronwen MacArthur

The connection between advances in human anatomy and kinesiology—the science of human movement—and dance practices from the early 1900s to the present. Study of seminal texts and practical exercises that drove the research of Frederick M. Alexander, Mabel Elsworth Todd, Barbara Clark, and Lulu Sweigard and the application of their ideas in contemporary movement practices today. Topics include the synthesis of dance and science; the reeducation of alignment, posture and balance; the use of imagery; and the unification of mind and body. No prior dance experience required. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* THST 098a, Composing and Performing the One Person PlayHal Brooks

First-year actors, playwrights, directors, and even students who have never considered taking a theater class, create their own work through a combination of reading, analysis, writing, and on-your-feet exercises. Students read texts and view performances that are generated by one actor in an attempt to discover the methodology that works best for their own creations. The course culminates with a midterm and final presentation created and performed by the student.  Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* THST 099b / FILM 045b, Dance on FilmEmily Coates

An examination of dance on film from c. 1920 to the present, including early Hollywood pictures, the rise of Bollywood, avant-garde films of the postwar period, translations of stage choreography to screen, music videos, and dance film festivals. The impact of industry, circulation and audience, aesthetic lineages, and craft in the union of the two mediums. Students develop an original short film for a final class project. No prior dance or filmmaking experience necessary. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* WGSS 030a, Neoliberalism and SexualityEvren Savci

Sexuality is often imagined as a private and intimate affair, experienced individually, marked by personal histories and preferences. This course argues otherwise. Specifically, we consider the intersections between the current dominant political economic mode, referred to as neoliberal capitalism, and sexuality as a field of power. We analyze how subjectivities are formed under this current system, how desires are produced and discourses incited, and how the particular moralization of economic behavior has implications for a range of issues including reproductive justice, definitions of kinship, sexual liberation movements, and contemporary states of war and emergency. Thinking of sexuality as a field of power that is predicated on notions of normality and abnormality enables us to see what other “undesirable” subjects are produced under conditions of neoliberal capitalist modernity with whom sexual others are always in kinship. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   SO
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* WGSS 032b, History of SexualityMaria Trumpler

Exploration of scientific and medical writings on sexuality over the past century. Focus on the tension between nature and culture in shaping theories, the construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality, the role of scientific studies in moral discourse, and the rise of sexology as a scientific discipline. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm