Freshman Seminar Program

The Freshman Seminar program offers a diverse array of courses open only to first-year students and designed with first-years in mind. Enrollment in seminars is limited to fifteen or eighteen students, depending on the nature of the course. Most seminars meet twice each week and do not, unless otherwise noted, presume any prior experience in the field. Students must apply and preregister for freshman seminars before the beginning of each term. To ensure that all applicants share an equal chance at enrolling in a seminar, students are admitted by lottery from among those who apply. Students who do not preregister may be considered for placement at the instructor's discretion if space is available. Information regarding application procedures may be found on the program's website.

Courses

* AFAM 015a / ANTH 015a, Black Girls in the American CityAimee Cox

Exploration of the various ways 'Black Girlhood' has been presented in the realms of popular culture, political discourse, and literature in comparison to the ways in which Black girls represent themselves and their lived experiences. The time period covers from the Great Migration to the present.  SO
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* AFAM 055a / AMST 026a / THST 096a, Protest Music in America and the Black Freedom StruggleDaphne Brooks

Exploration of the history, politics, and cultures of protest music across three centuries, including the multiple genres, aesthetics, and performance strategies innovated as forms of black liberation. Topics include uniquely subversive vocal strategies, lyrical tropes, and instrumental disturbances, as well as African American literature that interrogates the radical dimensions of black music in the context of captivity, the post-Reconstruction era, the Jim Crow era, the long Civil Rights, and Black Power movements. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   HURP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* AFAM 060b / AMST 060b / HIST 016b, Significance of American SlaveryEdward Rugemer

The history of American slavery, its destruction during the nineteenth century, and its significance today. Topics include the origins of slavery, the development of racism, the transatlantic slave trade, the experience of enslavement, resistance to slavery, the abolitionist movement, the process of emancipation, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor in the twenty-first century. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* ANTH 030a / ARCG 030a / LAST 030a, Inca Culture and SocietyRichard Burger

History of the Inca empire of the Central Andes, including the empire's impact on the nations and cultures it conquered. Overview of Inca religion, economy, political organization, technology, and society. Ways in which different schools of research have approached and interpreted the Incas over the last century, including the influence of nationalism and other sources of bias on contemporary scholarship. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO
Anthropology: Archaeology
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* APHY 050a / PHYS 050a, Science of Modern Technology and Public PolicyDaniel Prober

Examination of the science behind selected advances in modern technology and implications for public policy, with focus on the scientific and contextual basis of each advance. Topics are developed by the participants with the instructor and with guest lecturers, and may include nanotechnology, quantum computation and cryptography, renewable energy technologies, optical systems for communication and medical diagnostics, transistors, satellite imaging and global positioning systems, large-scale immunization, and DNA made to order. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SCRP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ARCH 005a, Modern Architecture and the CityKarla Britton

Issues in modern American architecture and urbanism examined through the work of prominent architects closely associated with Yale and New Haven. Perspectives on the character, development, and sociocultural consequences of building today. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* ARCH 009b / CPSC 078b, See it, Change it, Make itJulie Dorsey

Hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of digital capture, modeling, and fabrication. Topics include digital representations of shape, 3D scanning, shape modeling and editing, and physical production, including 3D printing, milling, and laser cutting. Architectural forms at a variety of scales used as vehicles for exploration and experimentation. There are no course prerequisites. Students are expected to be proficient in high school-level algebra, trigonometry, and geometry. No prior knowledge of architecture is expected. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  QR
M 2:30pm-4:20pm

* ART 003a / FILM 053a, BlueJessica Helfand

The cultural and iconic history of the color blue and its role as both a method and a motive for making work in the studio. The word "blue" and its etymological core, evocative connotations, colloquial nuance, and semantic role in different languages and cultures; scientific and sociological issues; blue in film and the fine arts. Projects experiment with writing, collecting, collage, and digital video. Use of materials from the Beinecke Library. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
W 2:30pm-4:20pm

* ART 004b, Words and PicturesHalsey Rodman

Introduction to visual narration, the combination of words and pictures to tell a story. Narrative point of view, counternarrative and counterculture, visual satire, personal history, depictions of space and time, and strategies and politics of representation. Sources include illuminated manuscripts, biblical paintings, picture-stories, comic strips, and graphic novels. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HURP
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ART 006a, Art of the Printed WordRichard Rose

Introduction to the art and historical development of letterpress printing and to the evolution of private presses. Survey of hand printing; practical study of press operations using antique platen presses and the cylinder proof press. Material qualities of printed matter, connections between content and typographic form, and word/image relationships. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ART 007b, Art of the GameSarah Stevens-Morling

Introduction to interactive narrative through video game programming, computer animation, and virtual filmmaking. Topics include interactive storytelling, video game development and modification, animation, and virtual film production. Students produce a variety of works including web-based interactive narratives, collaboratively built video games, and short game-animated film production (machinima). Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
WF 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ART 008a, The Gothic, the Grotesque, and Other Dark AestheticsMark Dery

Analytical approaches, drawn from philosophy, critical theory, and popular culture, to explore the darker corners of aesthetics, art history, and the visual landscape, including the Gothic, the Grotesque, the Decadent, camp, kitsch, and the sublime. Definitions of good taste and bad, beauty and ugliness, cuteness and creepiness; and the roles played by gender, race, class, and power in shaping such concepts and sensibilities. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HURP
WF 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ART 009b, The Visual BookRichard Rose

Consideration of the book as a work of art, as produced by some of the most influential and respected artists and designers of today. Different ways of understanding and making books through the creation of content that integrates text, images, color, graphic sequence, sculptural elements, and audience. In concert with assigned readings, students investigate approaches to ideation, book structure, graphic sequence, media/materials, collaborations, and thematic studies, culminating in a collective synthesis project.  RP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ART 010a, Mastering the Art of WatercolorAdam Van Doren

Introduction to the fundamentals of watercolor painting. Students learn to paint en plein air and to render color, form, perspective, composition, and shade and shadow. Analysis of works by such varied artists as J. M.W. Turner, John Singer Sargent, Maurice Prendergast, and Edward Hopper. Includes weekly painting assignments, scholarly readings, and a brief term paper. Open both to seasoned artists and to beginners; basic drawing skills recommended. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   HURP
W 2:30pm-5:30pm

* CGSC 071a, The Mind of a DogApril Ruiz

Examination of one of humans' closest companions: the domestic dog. Readings and class discussion explore how researchers study animal minds—from early observations of animal behavior to contemporary research in comparative cognition—and how this informs emerging work in canine cognition. Further discussion of how the human mind interprets dog behavior and how empirical investigations of canine cognition shed new light in understanding how pets see the world. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   SO
TTh 4pm-5:15pm

* CLCV 034b / HIST 037b / HSHM 002b, Medicine and Disease in the Ancient WorldJessica Lamont

Examination of ancient medicine considering modern fields of pathology, surgery, pharmacology, therapy, obstetrics, psychology, anatomy, medical science, ethics, and education, to gain a better understanding of the foundations of Western medicine and an appreciation for how medical terms, theories, and practices take on different meanings with changes in science and society. All readings in English. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* CPSC 035b, Twenty-First Century Electronic and Computer Music TechniquesScott Petersen

Exploration of twenty-first century electronic and computer music through the diverse subjects and issues at the intersection of technology and new music. How computers have changed and challenged the analysis, composition, production, and appreciation of music over the last fifty years. Knowledge of basic music theory and the ability to read Western musical notation is assumed. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* E&EB 050a, The Evolution of BeautyRichard Prum

Exploration of the fundamental mechanism of sexual selection and mate choice, and the patterns of display trait and mating preference coevolution. Additional topics include what happens when the freedom of mate choice is infringed or disrupted by sexual coercion or sexual violence; and the role of aesthetic evolution and sexual conflict in the evolution of human sexuality, pleasure, and sexual diversity.       Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* EALL 050a, Imperial Pleasure Parks and Private Gardens of ChinaPauline Lin

Study of imperial parks and private gardens in China, focusing on five historic times, spanning from the second century CE to modernity. Topics include the rationales, philosophies, and economics of constructing gardens; their designs; depictions in paintings and literature; their impact on the Chinese cultural imagination; modern commercial recreations of earlier gardens and environmental art; and the changing uses of gardens through time. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program  HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* ENGL 017b, Shakespeare's Major TragediesDavid Kastan

Detailed exploration of Shakespeare's Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth. What makes the plays great in a way that almost all readers and audiences have recognized. The works as plays to be performed, as drama to be read, as texts that have been constructed by the activities of various people, and as plays deeply embedded in the history of their own moment, as well as in later histories for which they are in some part responsible. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
English: Pre-1800 Lit
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 018b, Sequels, Prequels, Reverberations, Revisions in Modern LiteratureJoseph Gordon

Close reading of novels, memoirs, and journalism from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how certain novelists have set about to rework fiction and nonfiction source materials to create new narrative. The significance of such artistic means as shifting the setting, altering or questioning gender identity or sexual orientation of characters, or shifting the historical moment or political framework of the action. Exploration of how new works dispose the reader to reinterpret earlier works, providing a basis for redefining what constitutes originality in writing fiction. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 019a, Cosmology and LiteratureJohn Rogers

A study of the literature of cosmology and cosmogony, from Genesis, Hesiod, Plato, and Lucretius, to Milton, Newton, Swedenborg, Joseph Smith, L. Ron Hubbard, Jorge Luis Borges, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
English: Pre-1800 Lit
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* ENGL 020a / FILM 020a, Literature, Media, and WeatherJohn Peters

Interdisciplinary overview of how weather serves as a topic of human imagination and invention across such domains as literature and science, philosophy and religion, painting and popular culture. The stories we tell about weather, the temperamental and nebulous materials of weather, and the media that helps us understand it and shape it. Readings include poems, prose, and academic articles. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   WR, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ENGL 021b, Fiction and ConsciousnessJonathan Kramnick

Study of literature and the representation of consciousness, focusing in particular on the novel, from Jane Austen to the present. What literature can tell us about the way minds work; how novels represent the felt experience of people going about their lives; how literature partners with other ways of understanding the mind, such as psychology and neuroscience. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   WR, HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ENGL 022a, The Art of LosingNaomi Levine

Representation of heartache and haunting in literature, film, and popular music, and how art grapples with the experience of loss. Topics include teenage rebellion and disillusionment, lovesickness, elegy, the Victorian cult of death, historical trauma, spiritualism, and the occult. Course materials supplemented by archival objects (spirit photographs, memento mori jewelry, and letters) from the Beinecke Library and the Yale Center for British Art. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   WR, HU
English: Pre-1900 Lit
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* EVST 007a, The New England ForestMarlyse Duguid

Exploration of the natural history of southern New England, with specific focus on areas in and around New Haven. Pertinent environmental issues, such as climate change, endangered species, and the role of glacial and human history in shaping vegetative patterns and processes, are approached from a multi-disciplinary framework and within the context of the surrounding landscape.  Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 
Th 1pm-5pm

* EVST 020a / F&ES 020a, Sustainable Development in HaitiGordon Geballe

The principles and practice of sustainable development explored in the context of Haiti's rich history and culture, as well as its current environmental and economic impoverishment. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR
TTh 9am-10:15am

* FREN 012b / LITR 020b, French Literature in Global ContextJill Jarvis

Introduction to contemporary French fiction in a global perspective. Close readings of prizewinning novels by writers of the former French Empire—in Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean—alongside key manifestos and theoretical essays that define or defy the notion of world literature. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* G&G 010a / EVST 010a, Earth, Resources, Energy, and the EnvironmentMary-Louise Timmermans

Humankind's interactions with, and place within, the natural world. Plate tectonics and natural disasters, biological evolution and mass extinction, human evolution, population growth and ecology, industrial resources, groundwater and pollution, fossil fuels and energy transitions, the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases, paleoclimates, current global warming, alternative energies, and a planetary perspective on the Earth as a singular oasis in space. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* HIST 006b / HSHM 005b, Medicine and Society in American HistoryStaff

Disease and healing in American history from colonial times to the present. The changing role of the physician, alternative healers and therapies, and the social impact of epidemics from smallpox to AIDS. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 012b / AMST 012b, Politics and Society in the United States after World War IIJennifer Klein

Introduction to American political and social issues from the 1940s to the present, including political economy, civil rights, class politics, and gender roles. Legacies of the New Deal as they played out after World War II; the origins, agenda, and ramifications of the Cold War; postwar suburbanization and its racial dimensions; migration and immigration; cultural changes; social movements of the Right and Left; Reaganism and its legacies; the United States and the global economy. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HIST 020b / ARCG 031b / CLCV 059b / EVST 030b / NELC 026b, Rivers and CivilizationHarvey Weiss

The appearance of the earliest cities along the Nile and Euphrates in the fourth millennium B.C. Settlements along the rivers, the origins of agriculture, the production and extraction of agricultural surpluses, and the generation of class structures and political hierarchies. How and why these processes occurred along the banks of these rivers; consequent societal collapses and their relation to abrupt climate changes. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU, SO
TTh 9am-10:15am

* HIST 022a, What History TeachesJohn Gaddis

An introduction to the discipline of history. History viewed as an art, a science, and something in between; differences between fact, interpretation, and consensus; history as a predictor of future events. Focus on issues such as the interdependence of variables, causation and verification, the role of individuals, and to what extent historical inquiry can or should be a moral enterprise.  WR, HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 030a / EAST 030a, TokyoFabian Drixler

Four centuries of Japan's history explored through the many incarnations, destructions, and rebirths of its foremost city. Focus on the solutions found by Tokyo's residents to the material and social challenges of concentrating such a large population in one place. Tensions between continuity and impermanence, authenticity and modernity, and social order and the culture of play. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 032a / EAST 032a, ShanghaiDenise Ho

History of the city of Shanghai, with a focus on how Shanghai has been seen and what its experience reveals about modern China. Shanghai's unique place in imagining China; its transformation in the nineteenth century from a fishing village to an international "treaty port" and China's gateway to the West; twentieth-century Shanghai as a site of innovation, from politics and capitalism to media and fashion; the city's vilification in the early Mao years and later reemergence as a symbol of China's modernization. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* HIST 033a / WGSS 033a, Fashion in London and Paris, 1750 to the PresentBecky Conekin

Introduction to the history of Western fashion from the mid-eighteenth century to the present, with a focus on Paris and London. Approaches, methods, and theories scholars have historically employed to study fashion and dress. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 034a, Cuba from Slavery to RevolutionAnne Eller

Cuba’s rich history from the early colonial period to the present. Topics include colonialism, slavery, independence, emancipation, the Cuban Revolution, and the nation's relationship with the United States. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 9am-10:15am

* HIST 041b, The Americas in the Age of RevolutionsMarcela Echeverri Munoz

The connections, contrasts, and legacies of revolutions in the British, French, and Spanish Atlantic empires in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Interactions between liberalism, black politics and antislavery, indigenous autonomy and citizenship, and revolutions in the Atlantic world between the 1760s and 1880s. Topics include the foundations of the Atlantic empires, strands of anticolonialism across the Americas, social aspects of the revolutionary movements, abolitionism and emancipation processes, and relations between the emergent American nations. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 042a / MMES 042a, Oil and EmpireRosie Bsheer

The political and social history of oil since the late nineteenth century, including global trends and processes. Oil's impact on the rise and fall of empires and the fates of nation-states; its role in war and its impact on social and cultural life. Focus on the Middle East, with some attention to Venezuela, Indonesia, and the Niger Delta. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 043a, Understanding Totalitarian Philosophy from Central EuropeMarci Shore

The study of European intellectual history focused on philosophical responses to the totalitarian experiences of the 20th century. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 045a, The Holocaust and Its AfterlivesJennifer Allen

The history and memory of the Holocaust in Germany. How the Holocaust itself unfolded, and how Germany has worked through its legacy. Guilt and complicity, the logic of the concentration camps, the limits of totalitarianism, the representations of horror, the prosecution of atrocity, Holocaust memory across generations, and Germany's urban memory landscape. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* HIST 055b, A History of Modern LondonBecky Conekin

Chronological and thematic exploration of modern London as a metropolitan and imperial center from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include race, gay rights, women's rights, consumer culture, the experience of war, and the development of a multi-racial society. The fashion, food, and popular music of London emerge as important components of the city's global identity in the twentieth century. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 070a, Lawyers as RebelsRohit De

Examination of how lawyers have worked in illiberal and unjust legal systems. Key themes in global history of the twentieth century, such as imperialism, nationalism, apartheid, holocaust, civil rights, communism, feminism, and LGBT rights. Case studies include Gandhi, Mandela, Hersch Lauterpacht, Pauli Murray, and Asma Jahangir. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HIST 072b, The History of World HistoryValerie Hansen

How the great historians of ancient Greece, Rome, China, the Islamic world, and nineteenth-century Europe created modern historical method. How to evaluate the reliability of sources, both primary and secondary, and assess the relationship between fact and interpretation. Using historical method to make sense of our world today. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HURP
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HLTH 081a, Current Issues in Medicine and Public HealthRobert Bazell

Analysis of issues in public health and medicine that get extensive media attention and provoke policy debates. Topics include vaccination, the value of cancer screening and genetic testing, determinants of a healthy lifestyle, the U.S. role in global health, and the cost of health care. Enrollment limited to freshmen with a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement examination in Biology or the equivalent. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* HSAR 002a / AMST 007a, Furniture and American LifeEdward Cooke

In-depth study and interpretation of American furniture from the past four centuries. Hands-on experience with furniture in the collection of the Yale University Art Gallery to explore such topics as materials, techniques, styles, use, and meaning. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HURP
TTh 9am-10:15am

* HSHM 004a / HIST 062a, Technology and American MedicineRachel Elder

Drawing on perspectives from history and sociology, students explore how technology transformed medical knowledge and practice during the 20th century. Consideration of how technology came to occupy a central role in defining modern medicine through focus on the rise of hospital medicine, domestic medical devices, and numerous diagnostic and information technologies.
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* HUMS 065a, Education and the Life Worth LivingMatthew Croasmun

Consideration of education and what it has to do with real life—not just any life, but a life worth living. Engagement with three visions of different traditions of imagining the good life and of imagining education: Confucianism, Christianity, and Modernism. Students will be asked to challenge the fundamental question of the good life and to put that question at the heart of their college education. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* HUMS 071a, Intellectual CirclesCharles Hill

Study of the creative interactions produced by informal associations of innovative minds in literature, philosophy, politics, science, psychology, the arts, war, and law. Courtiers, advisors, disciples, and disputers around Confucius, Socrates, Lincoln, Freud, Wittgenstein, and Niebuhr are among the circles considered. Groups include American Founders, quantum physicists, computer scientists, Gertrude Stein’s “Lost Generation” of Americans in Paris, “The Georgetown Set” of Cold War friends and rivals, and the Supreme Court.  HU
WF 9am-10:15am

* HUMS 078b, Shakespeare and MusicJudith Malafronte

The use of music in Shakespeare's plays, from the original stagings and seventeenth-century adaptations to modern productions. Consideration of operatic versions of the plays from the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Includes a field trip to New York City. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MF 2:30pm-3:45pm

* HUMS 080a, Transforming Literature into OperaJudith Malafronte

Examination of ten operatic masterpieces and their literary source material, with consideration of the roles of the composer and the librettist in fashioning poems, short stories, and plays into operatic works. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MF 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MB&B 050a, Topics in Cancer BiologySandy Chang

Introduction to cancer as a genetic disease, with a focus on major discoveries in cancer biology that offer mechanistic insights into the disease process. A brief history of cancer; influence of the genomic revolution on cancer diagnostics; molecular defects underlying specific cancers; current and future cancer therapeutics. Patient case studies highlight specific molecular pathways and treatment strategies. Enrollment limited to freshmen with a strong background in biology and/or chemistry, typically demonstrated by a score of 5 on Advanced Placement examinations. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* MCDB 040b, The Science and Politics of CancerRobert Bazell

Fundamentals of cell biology, Darwinian evolution, immunology, and genetics that underlie cancer; the history of cancer science and treatment; historical and current policy issues. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* MCDB 050a or b, Immunology and MicrobesPaula Kavathas

Introduction to the immune system and its interaction with specific microbes. Attention both to microbes that cause illness, such as influenza, HIV, and HPV, and to microbes that live in harmony with humans, collectively called the microbiome. Readings include novels and historical works on diseases such as polio and AIDS. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SCRP
HTBA

* MCDB 065a, The Science and Politics of HIV/AIDSRobert Bazell

Study of the basic virology and immunology of HIV/AIDS, along with its extraordinary historical and social effects. Issues include the threat of new epidemics emerging from a changing global environment; the potential harm of conspiracy theories based on false science; and how stigmas associated with poverty, gender inequality, sexual preference, and race facilitate an ongoing epidemic. For all first-year students regardless of whether they are considering a science major. Prerequisite: AP Biology or equivalent. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   SC
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MUSI 012a, One Thousand Years of Love SongsAnna Zayaruznaya

History of the love song in Western culture from the twelfth-century troubadours to contemporary popular hits. Music and the shifting social constructions of desire over the past millennium. The song repertory's engagement with ideas and movements such as courtly love, humanism, romanticism, sexual libertinism, and the LGBT rights movement. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HURP
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MUSI 020b, Conducted Improvisation EnsembleMichael Veal

Exploration and elaboration of the conduction (i.e. conducted improvisation) methods of Lawrence “Butch” Morris (1947–2013). Ensemble rehearsals; weekly listening assignments to familiarize students with different approaches to improvised music; assigned readings that provide historical context for students' musical work. Players of all instruments and skill levels are welcome. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   HURP
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

* NELC 001a / AFST 001a / ARCG 001a, Egypt and Northeast Africa: A Multidisciplinary ApproachJohn Darnell

Examination of approximately 10,000 years of Nile Valley cultural history, with an introduction to the historical and archaeological study of Egypt and Nubia. Consideration of the Nile Valley as the meeting place of the cultures and societies of northeast Africa. Various written and visual sources are used, including the collections of the Peabody Museum and the Yale Art Gallery. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* RLST 015a / SAST 057a, Gods and Heroes in Indian ReligionsPhyllis Granoff

The basic doctrines and practices of India's three classical religions, Buddhism, Jainism, and Hinduism, explored through close reading of texts in translation. Lives of the founders, great monks, nuns, and lay followers of Buddhism and Jainism; myths of the major Hindu gods; heroines and goddesses in the three traditions. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* RLST 018b / SAST 058, Yoga in South Asia and BeyondSupriya Gandhi

The history of yoga practice and thought from the earliest textual discussions of yoga until the present day. Topics include the body, cosmology, cross-cultural interactions, colonialism, and orientalism. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* RLST 022a, Religion and Science FictionMaria Doerfler

Survey of contemporary science fiction with attention to its use and presentation of religious thought and practice. Focus on the ways in which different religious frameworks inform the literary imagination of this genre, and how science fiction in turn creates religious systems in both literature and society. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* RLST 026a / JDST 026a / PLSC 026a, Political TheologyEliyahu Stern

Investigation of the theological aspects of modern political ideologies. Topics include sovereignty, universalism, law, election, commandment, and messianism. Primary readings include selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, and the writings of Thomas Hobbes, Barukh Spinoza, Carl Schmidt, Mikhail Bakunin, Karl Marx, Jacob Taubes, Martin Buber, and Alain Badiou.    Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* RLST 082a / MMES 082a, Representing MuhammadTravis Zadeh

Interpretations of Muhammad’s life, including traditional and modern representations of Muhammad by pious Muslims, as well as an array of portrayals produced by non-Muslim polemicists and admirers, alike. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* SCIE 030a and SCIE 031b, Current Topics in ScienceDouglas Kankel

A series of modules in lecture and discussion format addressing scientific issues arising in current affairs. Topics are selected for their scientific interest and contemporary relevance, and may include global warming, human cloning, and the existence of extrasolar planets. Credit for SCIE 030 upon completion of SCIE 031; one course credit is awarded for successful completion of the year's work. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SC½ Course cr per term
F 1:30pm-3pm

* SOCY 018b, The Sociological ImaginationJulia Adams

Introduction to the linked study of sociology and modernity. Topics include the dramatic rise of capitalism; colonialism and empire; the advent of democracy and bureaucracy; the world-historical invention of the individual; and the contested role of religion in modernity. Readings from classical and contemporary authors. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 9am-10:15am

* SOCY 086a, China in the Age of Xi JinpingDeborah Davis

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China's recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy. May count toward the Sociology major as an intermediate course. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* THST 097b, Anatomy in MotionBronwen MacArthur

The connection between advances in human anatomy and kinesiology—the science of human movement—and dance practices from the early 1900s to the present. Study of seminal texts and practical exercises that drove the research of Frederick M. Alexander, Mabel Elsworth Todd, Barbara Clark, and Lulu Sweigard and the application of their ideas in contemporary movement practices today. Topics include the synthesis of dance and science; the reeducation of alignment, posture and balance; the use of imagery; and the unification of mind and body. No prior dance experience required. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.   HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* THST 098a, Composing and Performing the One Person PlayHal Brooks

First-year actors, playwrights, directors, and even students who have never considered taking a theater class, create their own work through a combination of reading, analysis, writing, and on-your-feet exercises. Students read texts and view performances that are generated by one actor in an attempt to discover the methodology that works best for their own creations. The course culminates with a midterm and final presentation created and performed by the student.  Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 
M 2:30pm-4:20pm

* THST 099a / FILM 045a, Dance on FilmEmily Coates

An examination of dance on film from c. 1920 to the present, including early Hollywood pictures, the rise of Bollywood, avant-garde films of the postwar period, translations of stage choreography to screen, music videos, and dance film festivals. The impact of industry, circulation and audience, aesthetic lineages, and craft in the union of the two mediums. Students develop an original short film for a final class project. No prior dance or filmmaking experience necessary. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* WGSS 032b, History of SexualityMaria Trumpler

Exploration of scientific and medical writings on sexuality over the past century. Focus on the tension between nature and culture in shaping theories, the construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality, the role of scientific studies in moral discourse, and the rise of sexology as a scientific discipline. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm