Music

Director of undergraduate studies: Ian Quinn, 205 STOECK, 432-2986, dus.music@yale.edu; yalemusic.yale.edu

The Department of Music offers introductory and advanced instruction in the history of music, the theory of music, composition, music technology, and performance. The Music major provides a general music program in the humanities, as well as preparation for graduate studies or for careers in music. 

Courses for Nonmajors and Majors

Introductory courses, numbered from 100 to 199, are open to all undergraduates and require no previous experience in music. 

Qualified students, whether majoring in music or not, may offer up to four terms of instruction in performance for academic credit toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the bachelor's degree. Of these four course credits, only two may be applied to the major in Music. Auditions for lessons are held at the beginning of the fall term; students sign up at the School of Music auditions site. Students who audition for lessons are placed into one of three groups: 1) noncredit instruction for a fee; 2) lessons for academic credit at the 300 level, graded Pass/Fail; or 3) lessons for academic credit at the 400 level, graded A–F. Only students with exceptional proficiency are placed into 400-level lessons. 

Students accepted for noncredit instruction are charged $550 for ten hours of lessons per term or $350 for six hours of lessons per term. The fees are added to the Student Financial Services bill and are not refundable after the first two weeks of lessons each term. Declared music majors in their junior or senior year may receive noncredit lessons at a discounted rate: six hours of lessons per term at no charge or ten hours of lessons per term for $275.

Course Numbering

Introductory courses are numbered from 100 to 199. Intermediate courses, numbered between 200 and 399, may require prerequisites or a familiarity with music notation. Advanced courses, numbered between 400 and 494, are intended for students who have completed intermediate courses in the relevant field. They are intended primarily for students majoring in music, but they may be elected by others who meet the stated prerequisites.

Corequisites and Lessons

Students taking MUSI 345 or 445 are required to be concurrently enrolled in an introductory or intermediate music theory or musicianship course (MUSI 100, 110, 200, 210211218, or 219) for two terms, or they must complete one term of the theory/musicianship requirement before enrolling in MUSI 345 or 445 for the first time, and another before enrolling in MUSI 345 or 445 again. MUSI 345 is taken Pass/Fail; MUSI 445 and the corequisites are taken for a letter grade.

Placement Procedures 

Students must take the Music Department's music theory placement test to determine their placement in the theory/musicianship sequences. Advanced Placement test scores do not satisfy the music theory prerequisites for performance instruction. Although the faculty of the School of Music attempts to accommodate those who qualify for credit instruction, it cannot guarantee that they will be enrolled with the teacher of their choice.

Requirements of the Major

The major for the Class of 2020 and previous classes With DUS approval, the following changes to the requirements of the major may be fulfilled by students who declared their major under previous requirements.

The major for the Class of 2021 and subsequent classes Thirteen courses are required, two intermediate courses and one advanced course in each of four groups, plus the senior requirement. Group I (MUSI 220–249; 320–349; 420-449) includes composition, technology, and performance courses with a practical focus on techniques of artistic production. Group II (MUSI 200–219; 300-319; 400–419) includes music-theory and technology courses focused on the materials and structures of musical works and repertoires. Group III (MUSI 250–274; 350-374; 450–474) includes lectures and seminars taking a research- and writing-based approach to the Western art-music tradition. Group IV (MUSI 275-299; 375-399; 475-494) includes lectures and seminars taking a research- and writing-based approach to popular or vernacular music or to music of non-Western traditions.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

Senior Requirement 

Each student majoring in Music must satisfy the senior requirement by completing a senior essay, composition, or recital in a course from the range MUSI 496–499.

The standard major Students must submit a completed Senior Project Form to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of the course selection period in the term during which the project will be completed. The Senior Project Form, available in the departmental office, includes a brief description of the project and a timeline for completion. The form must be signed by the project's primary and secondary advisers, at least one of whom is a member of the faculty of the Department of Music.

The intensive major The intensive major is for students of high standing who are qualified to do sustained independent and original work in music research or in composition. Students wishing to elect the intensive major must register for the senior project in the fall term of their senior year (MUSI 497–499). A plan for progress must be included in the project proposal at the beginning of the fall term, specifying a deliverable end-of-term product with approximately the same scope as a one-term senior project. Upon satisfactory completion of this work, a student may be admitted to the intensive major, which consists of a second term of registration for the senior project (MUSI 497–499). The additional course for the intensive major is supplementary to the thirteen term courses that constitute the standard major.

Advising

Simultaneous B.A./M.A. program Undergraduates with exceptionally strong preparation in music history or music theory may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. Students may not enroll in Yale College for more than eight terms to qualify for the simultaneous award of both degrees. Declared majors in Music may apply for the program until the last day of classes in their fifth term of enrollment, if they have completed at least two graduate courses in the Department of Music, at least one numbered 700 or higher, with grades of B+ or above, and if their overall grade average is A– or above. Applicants must demonstrate progress toward proficiency in a foreign language examined by the Department of Music.

Students in the simultaneous program fulfill the requirements for the intensive major in Music. They also take eight graduate courses in the Department of Music, with average grades of B+ or higher and grades of A or A– in at least two of the courses. They satisfy the Yale College requirements for the program (see "Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" in section K, Special Programs, in the Academic Regulations), and they pass a departmental examination in a modern foreign language.

B.A./M.M. program The Bachelor of Arts/Master of Music program is designed for students with outstanding abilities in performance who are also interested in a liberal arts education. Admission to the B.A./M.M. program is through acceptance into Yale College as well as a separate, successful audition through the School of Music, either before matriculation into Yale College, or after the third year of the B.A. program.

B.A./M.M. students usually complete requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in their first four years and for the Master of Music after one year of the Master of Music program in the School of Music (fifth year). Before their fourth year students should have completed, at a minimum, four terms of performance (MUSI 345 or MUSI 445) and four courses at the intermediate or advanced level in Groups II, III, or IV.

Students cannot accelerate the undergraduate program in the B.A./M.M. program.

In their fourth year, students must take MUS 540 and MUS 544 each term, and they are advised to take two terms of a performance ensemble if schedules permit. B.A./M.M. students who major in an orchestral instrument are required to participate in the Yale Symphony or the School of Music Philharmonia. Guitarists and keyboard players should consult with their major teacher about requisites beyond the lessons and seminar.

By the end of the fifth year all students participating in the B.A./M.M. program must have met the School of Music’s standard in musicianship and music history either through testing or course work. They must also have completed language and keyboard proficiency requirements.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 13 term courses numbered 200 or above (inc senior req)

Specific courses required None

Distribution of courses 2 courses from each intermediate group I–IV; 1 course from each advanced group I–IV

Senior requirement One-term senior essay or project in MUSI 496–499

Intensive major Two-term senior essay or project in MUSI 497–499; additional course is supplementary to the thirteen term course req

The Department of Music offers courses in ethnomusicology, music history, music theory, music technology, composition, and performance. Students may take most introductory courses without prerequisite. The department also offers first-year seminars without prerequisites. 

First-year students with appropriate preparation are also welcome in more advanced courses. Courses at the 200 level assume familiarity with music notation; many courses at the 300 and 400 levels assume the ability to read music.

Students interested in music—whether or not they are considering the Music major—are encouraged to take courses in music theory. Students are assigned to the appropriate course through the music theory placement test, which is given at the beginning of both the fall and spring terms. Students who have taken the AP tests in music must still take the placement test. 

Voice and instrument lessons are available to qualified students. Students who want to take lessons must audition in the fall. Advanced students are eligible to take lessons for credit beginning with enrollment in MUSI 345 or MUSI 445. To qualify for credit, students must play at a sufficiently high level and be taking or place out of (by the music theory placement test) the appropriate theory course, as described in Yale College Programs of Study. Please see the Music Lessons page on the departmental website for more details.

Test dates and audition information will be on the departmental website and published in the Calendar for the Opening Days.

FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

Professors Kathryn Alexander (Adjunct), Richard Cohn, Michael Friedmann (Adjunct), Daniel Harrison, Paul Hawkshaw (Adjunct), James Hepokoski (Chair), Richard Lalli (Adjunct), Patrick McCreless, Leon Plantinga (Emeritus), Ian Quinn, Ellen Rosand (Emeritus), Gary Tomlinson, Michael Veal (on leave [Sp])

Associate Professors Robert Holzer (Adjunct), Brian Kane, Gundula Kreuzer (on leave [Sp]), Markus Rathey (Adjunct), Anna Zayaruznaya (on leave)

Assistant Professors Konrad Kaczmarek, Henry Parkes

Lecturers Daniel Egan, Andrew Gerle, Grant Herreid, Annette Jolles, Sara Kohane, Joshua Rosenblum, Wendy Sharp, Maho Ishiguro, Marissa Moore, Scott Frankel, Nathaniel Adam

First-Year Seminar

* MUSI 007a, NoiseBrian Kane

The topic of noise as an introduction to the problems of sound and signification. The surplus of information in white noise, and the meaning perceived when noise is filtered. Contexts in which noise has become filtered for political and aesthetic ends. Topics include sound poetry, literature, electronic music, noise pollution, and consumption. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required. Please go to the following website to enter preferences for seminars: https://students.yale.edu/ocs-preference/select/select?id=2041WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Introductory Courses

MUSI 110a or b, Introduction to the Elements of MusicStaff

The fundamentals of musical language (notation, rhythm, scales, keys, melodies, and chords), including writing, analysis, singing, and dictation. Intended for students who have no music reading ability.
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MUSI 175b, Listening to MusicMarissa Moore

Development of aural skills that lead to an understanding of Western music. The musical novice is introduced to the ways in which music is put together and is taught how to listen to a wide variety of musical styles, from Bach and Mozart, to Gregorian chant, to the blues.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

Intermediate Courses: Group I

* MUSI 220a and MUSI 221b, The Performance of Chamber MusicWendy Sharp

Coached chamber music emphasizing the development of ensemble skills, familiarization with the repertory, and musical analysis through performance. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail wendy.sharp@yale.edu. Credit for MUSI 220 only on completion of MUSI 221.  RP½ Course cr per term
T 4:30pm-6pm

* MUSI 221b, The Performance of Chamber MusicWendy Sharp

Preparing and performing chamber music works, including rehearsal techniques, leading, developing musical concepts, learning to work effectively in a small group, and performing.  Weekly coaching and rehearsals, bimonthly studio classes, and end-of-term recitals. Open to qualified Yale College instrumentalists and pianists by audition only. Prerequisite: MUSI 220. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail wendy.sharp@yale.edu.  RP½ Course cr
T 4:30pm-6pm

* MUSI 222a or b, The Performance of Vocal MusicRichard Lalli

A course for singers and pianists that emphasizes the analysis and musical preparation of classical solo song and operatic repertoire. Examination of structure (poetic, harmonic, motivic), discussion of style, exploration of vocal techniques, and introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet. Students are strongly encouraged to supplement the course with individual voice instruction. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail richard.lalli@yale.edu.  HURP
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* MUSI 228a / THST 224a, Musical Theater Performance IAndrew Gerle

The structure and meaning of traditional and contemporary musical theater repertoire. Focus on ways to "read" a work, decipher compositional cues for character and action, facilitate internalization of material, and elicit lucid interpretations. For singers, pianists, and directors. Prerequisites: MUSI 211 and 219, or with permission of instructor. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail dan.egan@yale.edu.  HURP
F 1:30pm-4:30pm

* MUSI 232a or b, Central Javanese Gamelan EnsembleMaho Ishiguro

An introduction to performing the orchestral music of central Java and to the theoretical and aesthetic discourses of the gamelan tradition. Students form the nucleus of a gamelan ensemble that consists primarily of tuned gongs and metallophones; interested students may arrange for additional private instruction on more challenging instruments. The course culminates in a public performance by the ensemble. No previous musical experience required.  RP
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* MUSI 330b, Musical Theater Composition IIScott Frankel

Intermediate and advanced project-oriented studies in composition of musical theater. Prerequisite: MUSI 210. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 12.  HURP
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

Intermediate Courses: Group II

* MUSI 210a or b, Elementary Studies in Analysis and Model Composition IStaff

Practical investigation of the basic principles of tonal harmony, counterpoint, and composition through exercises in analysis, motivic development, phrase rhythm, texture, form, performance, and model composition. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MUSI 218 or 219. Admission after MUSI 110 or by the music theory placement test. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the Music department Web site for information about the placement test. To be followed by MUSI 211.  HU
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* MUSI 211a or b, Elementary Studies in Analysis and Model Composition IIStaff

Continuation of MUSI 210. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MUSI 218 or 219. Admission after MUSI 210 or by the music theory placement test. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the Music department Web site for information about the placement test.  HURP
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* MUSI 218a or b, Elementary Musicianship IStaff

Exercises in melodic and harmonic dictation, sight-singing, keyboard harmony, and aural analysis Admission after MUSI 110 or by the music theory placement test. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the Music department Web site for information about the placement test  RP½ Course cr
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* MUSI 219a or b, Elementary Musicianship IIStaff

Continuation of MUSI 218. Prerequisite: MUSI 218. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MUSI 210 or 211.  RP½ Course cr
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* MUSI 229b / THST 226b, Musical Theater Performance IIAnnette Jolles

The collaborative process and its effect on musical theater performance. Choreography, music direction, and origination of new works. Analysis of texts, scripts, and taped or filmed performances; applications in students' own performance. May be repeated for credit. For audition information e-mail dan.egan@yale.edu.  RP
F 1:30pm-4:30pm

* MUSI 318b, Intermediate MusicianshipRichard Lalli

Training in advanced aural perception, sight-singing, and keyboard skills. Prerequisite: MUSI 219.
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Intermediate Courses: Group III

* MUSI 351a, Music in European Court, Church, and Theater, 1600-1800James Hepokoski

A detailed investigation of the history of musical style from 1600 to 1800. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* MUSI 352b, The European Art-Music Tradition, 1800-1950James Hepokoski

A detailed investigation of the history of musical style from 1800 to the present. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

Intermediate Courses: Group IV

* MUSI 314b, Instrumentation and OrchestrationKathryn Alexander

A study of instrumentation and orchestration in a variety of musical periods, genres and styles. Related creative project work and weekly labs. MUSI 210 or equivalent.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* MUSI 320a, Composition Seminar IKathryn Alexander

Intermediate analytic and creative projects in music composition, instrumentation, and scoring for visual media. Study of compositional procedures and techniques in different genres and styles. Group and individual lessons to supplement in-class activities. Enrollment limited to 20. Students with questions should contact the instructor at kathryn.alexander@yale.edu. Prerequisite: MUSI 210 or 211 or equivalent.   WR, HURP
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

* MUSI 345a or b, Introduction to Sound StudiesRichard Gard

Individual instruction in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Auditions for assignment to instructors (for both credit and noncredit lessons) are required for freshmen and some returning students, and are held only at the beginning of the fall term. For details, see the Music department's program description in the YCPS. sound studies intersects with more traditional methods of music studies.
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Advanced Courses: Group I

* MUSI 421b, Composition Seminar IVKathryn Alexander

Advanced analytic and creative projects in music composition and scoring for visual media. Ongoing study of evolving contemporary procedures and compositional techniques. Group and individual lessons to supplement in-class lectures. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 10. To audition, students should upload two PDF scores and MP3 recordings in a single zip file by 4 p.m. on Wednesday, January 17, to the designated Music 413 Audition assignment page at the Canvas site. Students with questions should contact the instructor at kathryn.alexander@yale.edu. Prerequisites: both MUSI 312 and 313.   RP
Th 2:30pm-4:20pm

Advanced Courses: Group II

* MUSI 445a or b, Advanced LessonsRichard Gard

Individual instruction for advanced performers in the study and interpretation of musical literature. Auditions for assignment to instructors (for both credit and noncredit lessons) are required for freshmen and some returning students, and are held only at the beginning of the fall term. For details, see the Music department's program description in the YCPS.
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* MUSI 404a, Nineteenth-Century Music: Analysis and Model CompositionRichard Cohn

Studies in the theory, analysis, and composition of music of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: MUSI 211. Enrollment limited to 18. Preference to Music majors according to class.  HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MUSI 418a, Advanced MusicianshipMichael Friedmann

Development of students' ability to recognize and generate structures and processes particular to music of the twentieth century. Student composers and advanced performers of post-tonal music expand their perceptive skills. Course activities include singing (and playing), dictation, identification, improvisation, and recognition. Musical examples from the works of Schoenberg, Bartók, Debussy, and Stravinsky. Enrollment limited to 14.
TTh 10:30am-11:20am

Advanced Courses: Group III

Advanced Courses: Group IV 

Individual Study and Senior Projects

* MUSI 495a or b, Individual StudyIan Quinn

Original essay in ethnomusicology, music history, music theory, or music technology and/or multimedia art under the direction of a faculty adviser. Admission to the course upon submission to the department of the essay proposal by the registration deadline, and approval of the director of undergraduate studies.
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* MUSI 496a or b, The Senior RecitalIan Quinn

Preparation and performance of a senior recital and accompanying essay under faculty supervision. Admission by permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Prerequisite: MUSI 461.
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* MUSI 497a or b, The Senior Project in CompositionIan Quinn

Preparation of a senior composition project under faculty supervision. Admission by permission of the composition faculty of the Department of Music. Prerequisites: MUSI 312, 313, 412, and 413.
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