Naval Science

Program adviser: Commander Adam Schlismann, USN; rm. 430, 55 Whitney Ave., 432-8223, adam.schlismann@yale.edu; nrotc.yalecollege.yale.edu 

The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program educates young men and women for service as commissioned officers in the United States Navy (USN) or Marine Corps (USMC). NROTC develops future officers mentally, morally, and physically, and instills in them the highest ideals of duty and loyalty and the core values of honor, courage, and commitment. The Naval Science program prepares students to assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizenship, and government.

Academic Requirements

The Naval Science curriculum includes courses on topics such as Navy and Marine Corps organization, at-sea navigation, leadership, naval history, amphibious warfare, engineering, and weapons systems. Courses emphasize development of professional knowledge and leadership skills, which are placed in the context of military service immediately following graduation from Yale College.

Students in the NROTC program enroll in one Naval Science course per term. Some courses are required for both Navy and Marine option students, while others are specific to the branch of service. All NROTC students must also enroll in the Naval Science Laboratory each term.

Navy students must complete eight core curriculum courses offered by Yale College: two term courses in calculus to be completed by the sophomore year, two term courses in calculus-based physics (with laboratory) to be completed by the junior year, two term courses in English or equivalent writing courses, one term course in history or national security policy, and one term course in world culture or regional studies.

For Navy students, the usual sequence of Naval Science courses is:

First-Year Sophomore Junior Senior
Introduction to Naval Science Leadership & Management Naval Engineering Naval Operations
Military History of the West since 1500 Navigation Naval Systems Leadership & Ethics

Marine students must complete three core curriculum courses offered by Yale College, including two term courses in English or equivalent writing courses, and one term course in history or national security policy.

For Marine Corps students, the usual sequence of Naval Science courses is:

First-Year Sophomore Junior Senior
Introduction to Naval Science Leadership & Management Elective Evolution of Warfare
Military History of the West since 1500 Elective Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare Leadership & Ethics

Advising and Application to the Program

Application to the National Scholarship Program Eligible applicants must use the online application to complete and submit all the required information to apply for the NROTC scholarship. Applicants select either the Navy or Marine Corps option and scholarship recipients are appointed midshipmen in either the United States Naval Reserve (USNR) or United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR), as appropriate. Scholarship recipients are granted the compensation and benefits authorized by law and current policy for a total period not to exceed four years (forty months or fifty months with approved fifth year benefits). During this period, the United States government pays for college tuition, authorized academic fees, a textbook stipend, and a subsistence allowance, and provides uniforms or compensation in lieu. Upon conferral of a degree, graduates are commissioned into the Navy or Marine Corps for a minimum of five years of active duty service. Yale students who matriculate without a scholarship may apply for the National Scholarship program during the fall term of their first year.

Application to the College Program Students without a scholarship, who are in their first or second year, may apply for enrollment in the College Program and compete for two- or three-year scholarships. If selected for the two- or three-year Scholarship Program, students receive the same benefits as students in the National Scholarship Program for their remaining undergraduate studies. Upon conferral of a degree, graduates of the College Program are commissioned into the Navy or Marine Corps for a minimum of three years of active duty service. Yale students interested in the College Program may apply directly to the Yale University NROTC Unit.

Yale NROTC midshipmen are required to complete the course of study prescribed by their Yale degree program and enroll in one Naval Science course each term in addition to other NROTC-specific academic requirements. Midshipmen must enroll in Naval Science Laboratory (NAVY 100), where they are exposed to formal drill, military science presentations, guest lecturers, and practical sessions in Naval Science course work. They are also required to wear their uniforms to their weekly Naval Science Lab and other battalion activities.

Participating in the NROTC program does not preclude involvement in other campus or community organizations, sports, or activities. On average, we expect midshipmen to devote approximately five to six hours a week to the NROTC program. Each term, this includes:

  • One Naval Science course
  • One Navy Science laboratory
  • Physical training once per week
  • Optional extracurricular activities such as Drill Team/Color Guard

During the summer, midshipmen take part in summer training cruises aboard ships or submarines, with aircraft squadrons, or in the field with Marine Corps units. Midshipmen have found their summer cruise experiences very rewarding. In addition to the hands-on training opportunities alongside Sailors and Marines, midshipmen gain valuable insight regarding future service assignments.

New Student Orientation (NSO) will take place August 13—August 18, 2018. Incoming first-year students will report to the Yale NROTC unit on the morning of August 13. They will be transported from the unit to the Naval Station in Newport, RI to begin their five-day training experience. This period of instruction focuses on military orientation practices and topics such as drill, uniform wear, core values, customs and courtesies, chain of command, and inspections. Professional training on Naval operations, service selection, drug and alcohol policies, and equal opportunity/sexual harassment policies helps to create the foundation upon which four more years of professional training will be built. Attendance at First-year Orientation is not mandatory, but is highly encouraged. If students also wish to participate in Yale's First-Year Outdoor Orientation Trips (FOOT), NSO will conclude prior to FOOT's commencement to allow participation in both.

For additional information about the NROTC program at Yale, visit the Yale University NROTC Website, or send questions to nrotc@yale.edu. Information about the NROTC program in general is available on the National NROTC Website.

FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE

Professor Captain Wayne Grasdock, USN (Adjunct)

Lecturers Lieutenant Garrett Alfstad, USN, Captain Timothy Brunstetter, USMC, Lieutenant Brandon Ordway, USN, Commander Adam Schlismann, USN, Lieutenant Brian Schoendorfer, USN, 

Courses

NAVY 100a or b, Naval Science LaboratoryStaff

Leadership and practical application skills from the Professional Core Competency objectives that are not covered in other Naval Science courses. Emphasis on professional training that is not of an academic nature. Includes both classroom instruction and physical training. Topics and special briefings as determined by Naval Science faculty and the Naval Service Training Command. Required for NROTC students each term. Receives no credit; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.  0 Course cr
F 12:30pm-2:30pm

* NAVY 111a, Introduction to Naval ScienceGarrett Alfstad

An overview of the naval service for first-year Naval ROTC students and others interested in pursuing the NROTC program. Organization, missions, customs and traditions, leadership principles, ethics, duties of a junior officer, and career options in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Discussion of shipboard organization and procedures, safety, and damage control prepares students for summer training aboard naval vessels. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
T 7am-8:45am

NAVY 211a, Leadership and ManagementAdam Schlismann

A study of leadership, ethics, resource management, and organizational behavior, with emphasis on situations commonly encountered by junior officers in the naval service. Classical theories of management, motivation, and communication; development of skills in organizational thinking and problem solving. Required for second-year NROTC students. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
Th 7am-8:45am

* NAVY 212b, NavigationStaff

Introduction to surface-ship nagivation and practical piloting in both restricted and open water. Celestial navigation theory, navigational charts and instruments, and electronic navigation. Weather and other environmental factors that affect naval operations. Navigation rules and regulations, maneuvering board concepts, and practical exercises. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
HTBA

NAVY 311a, Naval EngineeringBrandon Ordway

An overview of Naval engineering systems and a detailed study of the principles behind ship construction. Topics include ship design, hydrodynamic forces, stability, conventional and nuclear propulsion, electrical theory and systems, interior communications, damage control, hydraulics, and ship control. Basic concepts in the theory and design of steam, gas turbine, and diesel propulsion. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
MTh 7:30am-8:45am

NAVY 312b, Naval SystemsStaff

The characteristics and capabilities of the major systems and platforms used in the U.S. Navy. Technical concepts and scientific theory addressed through study of designations, characteristics, capabilities, and missions of ships and aircraft. How computers and electronic and space-based communications influence operational employment of various naval platforms. Classic theory of radar, sonar, and fire-control systems. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
HTBA

NAVY 411a, Naval Operations and SeamanshipBrian Schoendorfer

Study of relative motion, formation tactics, and ship employment. Introductions to Naval operations and operations analysis, ship behavior and characteristics in maneuvering, applied aspects of ship handling, afloat communications, Naval command and control, Naval warfare areas, and joint warfare. Analysis of case studies involving related moral, ethical, and leadership issues. Prerequisites: NAVY 111 and 112. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
TF 7:30am-8:45am

* NAVY 412b, Leadership and EthicsStaff

Exploration of Western moral traditions and ethical philosophy and of their applications to naval leadership in the twenty-first century. Topics include military leadership, core values, and professional ethics; the Uniform Code of Military Justice and Navy regulations; the roles of enlisted members, junior and senior officers, command relationships, and the conduct of warfare. Discussion of current and historical events in the United States Navy and Marine Corps. Prerequisite: NAVY 212. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
HTBA

* NAVY 413b, Evolution of WarfareStaff

The development of warfare to the present day, with attention to the causes of continuity and change in the means and methods of warfare. The influence of political, economic, and societal factors on the conduct of war, with a focus on the role of technological innovation in changing the battlefield. The contributions of preeminent military theorists and battlefield commanders to the modern understanding of the art and science of war. Prerequisites: NAVY 111 and 212. Required for Marine-option NROTC students. For enrollment credit only; cannot be applied toward the 36-course-credit requirement for the Yale bachelor's degree. Grades earned in this course do not count toward GPA or eligibility for General Honors.
HTBA

HIST 221b / GLBL 281b, Military History of the West since 1500Paul Kennedy

A study of the military history of the West since 1500, with emphasis on the relationship between armies and navies on the one hand, and technology, economics, geography, and the rise of the modern nation-state on the other. The coming of airpower in its varied manifestations. Also meets requirements for the Air Force and Naval ROTC programs.  HU
TTh 10:30am-11:20am