Ancient Greek (GREK)

GREK 110a, Beginning Greek: The Elements of Greek GrammarStaff

Introduction to ancient Greek. Emphasis on morphology and syntax within a structured program of readings and exercises. Prepares for GREK 120. No prior knowledge of Greek assumed.  L1RP1½ Course cr
MTWThF 9:25am-10:15am

GREK 120b, Beginning Greek: Review of Grammar and Selected ReadingsStaff

Continuation of GREK 110. Emphasis on consolidating grammar and on readings from Greek authors. The sequence GREK 110, 120 prepares for 131 or 141. Prerequisite: GREK 110 or equivalent.  L2RP1½ Course cr
MTWThF 10:30am-11:20am

* GREK 125b, Intensive Beginning GreekTimothy Robinson

An introduction to classical Greek for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Readings from Greek authors supplement intensive instruction in grammar and vocabulary. The course is intended to be of use to students with diverse academic backgrounds and interests. Prepares for GREK 131. Not open to students who have taken GREK 110, 120.  L1, L2RP2 Course cr
HTBA

GREK 131a, Greek Prose: An IntroductionStaff

Close reading of selections from classical Greek prose with review of grammar. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 141 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 9:25am-10:15am

GREK 141b, Homer: An IntroductionJames Patterson

A first approach to reading Homeric poetry in Greek. Selected books of the Iliad or the Odyssey. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 131 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 10:30am-11:20am

GREK 403b, The History and Structure of Ancient Greek: From Word to TextEgbert Bakker

An introduction to three essential aspects of Ancient Greek: (i) the structure of the word; (ii) the structure of sentences and clauses in the language; (iii) the structure of longer stretches of connected discourse. The first component (weeks 1-7) is a brief introduction into Into-European comparative-historical linguistics and will focus on the phonology and morphology of Greek verbs and nouns; the third component (weeks 8-13) is a systematic analysis of Greek prose, with detailed attention to the properties through which texts "cohere" (such as particles, deictics, and tenses); the second component is taught as part of each class meeting on the basis of translation-into-Greek ("composition") exercises. GREK 131 or equivalent. This course is open to all undergraduate students who are eligible to enroll in GREK 400-level courses. It is also required for graduate students in the Classical Philology track as per the current program.  L5, HU
HTBA

* GREK 423a, Sappho and the LyricPauline LeVen

This advanced ancient Greek seminar focuses on the works of the 7th/6th-century BCE Lesbian singer-songwriter Sappho and some of her lyric contemporaries. It examines the stylistic, generic, and historical questions raised by her song production and investigates some of the major themes of her fragments (love, sex, friendship, time, memory, mythical revisions) while situating them in the larger context of other lyric poets and on the background of the Homeric tradition. Attention is also be paid to features of the reception of Sappho (starting with her ancient biographies, down to her reception in Latin America) and to the question of lyric as a genre (or mode) of performance and personal expression.    Prerequisite: 4 semesters of college-level language study or equivalent (in which case, please contact the instructor).   L5, HU
TTh 9am-10:15am

* GREK 435a, The Greek HistoriansJoseph Solodow

Close reading of the major Greek historians, Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius, also Eastern and pre-Herodotean Greek writings, Hellenistic histories, including Acts of the Apostles and II Maccabees: their aims, historical methods, literary techniques, influence on historiography. Readings in both Greek and English. Prerequisite: Two years of college-level Greek.  L5, HU0 Course cr
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* GREK 494a, Independent Tutorial in Greek Language and LiteratureAndrew Johnston

For students with advanced Greek language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered in courses. The work should result in a term paper or examination. A limited number of these courses may be offered toward the major. Offered subject to faculty availability.
HTBA

GREK 703b, The History and Structure of Ancient Greek: From Word to TextEgbert Bakker

This course provides a brief introduction to the comparative-historical study of Greek verbs and nouns; sentence-level grammatical training based on “composition” exercises; and awareness of “syntax beyond the sentence”: the linguistic means ancient Greek speakers and writers had at their disposal to create “cohesion” of their discourse as a means for the text to achieve its communicative or rhetorical goals. The course provides a thorough grounding in the structure of ancient Greek words, sentences, and texts. It fulfills the graduate course requirements for Greek prose composition and historical or comparative linguistics.
HTBA

GREK 723a, Sappho and the LyricPauline LeVen

This advanced ancient Greek seminar focuses on the works of the 7th/6th-century BCE Lesbian singer-songwriter Sappho and some of her lyric contemporaries. It examines the stylistic, generic, and historical questions raised by her song production and investigates some of the major themes of her fragments (love, sex, friendship, time, memory, mythical revisions) while situating them in the larger context of other lyric poets and on the background of the Homeric tradition. Attention is also paid to features of the reception of Sappho (starting with her ancient biographies, down to her reception in Latin America) and to the question of lyric as a genre (or mode) of performance and personal expression.
TTh 9am-10:15am