Biomedical Engineering

Director of undergraduate studies: James Duncan, N309 D TAC, 785-2427, 313 MEC, 432-9917; seas.yale.edu/departments/biomedical-engineering

Engineering methods and strategies are used to address biomedical problems ranging from studies of physiological function using images to the development of artificial organs and new biomaterials. The B.S. degree in Biomedical Engineering is designed to provide students with an understanding of common fundamental methodologies and the ability to develop quantitative approaches to one of four biomedical engineering tracks: Bioimaging, Biomechanics and Mechanobiology, Biomolecular Engineering, and Systems Biology. The flexible course structure of the major permits students to bridge basic concepts in the life sciences and traditional areas of engineering, while gaining a comprehensive understanding of biomedical engineering as a field of study.

Prerequisites

The following prerequisites are common to all tracks in the major: BIOL 101 and 102 or a higher-level course in MCDB or MB&B, with the permission of the director of undergraduate studies (DUS); a lecture course in chemistry numbered CHEM 161 or higher; ENAS 194MATH 115 (not necessary if placed into MATH 120 or ENAS 151); MATH 120 or ENAS 151; PHYS 180, 181, 205L, and 206L (or 165L and 166L, with DUS permission).

Requirements of the Major

Students must complete thirteen term courses, totaling at least eleven course credits, beyond the prerequisites, including at least three required courses in the chosen track; two terms of a biomedical engineering laboratory (BENG 355L, 356L); BENG 280, a half-credit course taken sophomore year as part of the senior requirement; and the senior requirement (see below). During the first year, students study basic mathematics, chemistry, and biology. By the end of the sophomore year, students should have taken physics, ENAS 194, BENG 249, and BENG 350. In the junior year, students gain a comprehensive grounding in the field through BENG 351, BENG 352, BENG 353, BENG 355L, and BENG 356L. During the junior and senior years, students acquire depth by taking electives in one of the four areas of concentration. One relevant course (e.g. MB&B 300) may be substituted with DUS permission. A senior seminar and a senior project give students practical, detailed information about their chosen area of concentration. 

Students in all tracks are required to take the following courses: BENG 249, 280, 350, 351, 352, 353, 355L356L and 480.

Students in the Bioimaging track must also take three courses chosen from BENG 404406410, 444, 445, 475, 476, or 485.

Students in the Biomechanics and Mechanobiology track must also take three courses chosen from MENG 185, 280, 361, BENG 404, 406, 410, 434, 453, 455, 456457, or 458.

Students in either the Biomolecular Engineering track and the Systems Biology track must also take three courses chosen from BENG 404, BENG 410, 411, 434, 435, 463, 464, 465467, or MENG 361.

Research Courses Students are permitted and encouraged to engage in research before the senior year by enrolling in BENG 471 and/or BENG 472. These courses, offered Pass/Fail, may be taken more than once for credit, but repeated courses do not count toward the major. See Academic Regulations, section C, Course Credits and Course Loads.

Credit/D/Fail No course taken Credit/D/Fail may count toward the major, including prerequisites.

Roadmap See visual roadmap of the requirements.

Senior Requirement

In their sophomore year, all students must enroll in BENG 280 and in their senior year, all students must enroll in BENG 480; both are half-credit courses. They must also complete a one-term senior project in their final term of enrollment (BENG 474) or a two-term, yearlong project (BENG 473, 474).

Advising

Preparation for graduate study The Biomedical Engineering curriculum is excellent preparation for graduate study in engineering, science, and medicine. In some cases, organic chemistry and/or certain biology courses may be substituted for one course in the major after consultation with the DUS.

Combined B.S./M.S. degree program Exceptionally able and well-prepared students may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.S. and M.S. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. See Academic Regulations, section K, Special Arrangements, “Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees.” Interested students should consult the DUS prior to the sixth term of enrollment for specific requirements in Biomedical Engineering

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites BIOL 101 and 102, or higher-level course in MCDB or MB&B with DUS permission; 1 lecture course in chemistry numbered CHEM 161 or higher; ENAS 194; MATH 115 (not necessary if placed into MATH 120 or ENAS 151); MATH 120 or ENAS 151; PHYS 180, 181, and 205L, 206L (or 165L, 166L with DUS permission)

Number of courses 13 term courses, totaling at least 11 course credits, beyond prerequisites (incl senior req)

Specific courses required All tracksBENG 249, 280, 350, 351, 352, 353, 355L, 356L, 480; Bioimaging track—3 from BENG 404, 406410, 444, 445, 475, 476, 485; Biomechanics and Mechanobiology track—3 from MENG 185, 361, BENG 404, 406, 410, 434, 453, 455, 456457458; Biomolecular Engineering track and Systems Biology track—3 from BENG 404410, 411, 434, 435, 463, 464, 465, 467, MENG 361

Distribution of courses 2 term courses in life sciences among prerequisites and required courses (typically BIOL 101 and 102 and BENG 350)

Substitution permitted Relevant course with DUS permission 

Senior requirement BENG 280, a half-credit course taken sophomore year; BENG 480, a half-credit course taken senior year; a one-term senior project in final term of enrollment (BENG 474) or two-term, yearlong senior project (BENG 473 and 474)

Engineering methods and strategies are used today to address biomedical problems ranging from studies of physiological function using images to the development of artificial organs and new biomaterials. The major in Biomedical Engineering provides an understanding of the common methods that underlie many of these disciplines, as well as the ability to develop detailed quantitative approaches in one of the biomedical engineering fields.

In offering four tracks (Bioimaging, Biomechanics and Mechanobiology, Biomolecular Engineering, and Systems Biology), the Biomedical Engineering major provides for a variety of flexible programs corresponding to a range of student interests. The major can easily be adapted to the requirements for medical school.

First-year students interested in Biomedical Engineering study mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. General recommendations for a course of study in the first year are available under Biology.

There will be a meeting in the fall for students interested in the major. Information about Biomedical Engineering at Yale is available on the department website. The director of undergraduate studies (DUS) welcomes consultation with students about their programs. 

FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Professors †Helene Beneviste, †Joerg Bewersdorf, Richard Carson, †Nicholas Christakis, †Todd Constable, †Robin de Graaf, James Duncan, Jay Humphrey, Fahmeed Hyder, Themis Kyriakides, †Francis Lee, Andre Levchenko, †Graham Mason, †Evan Morris, †Laura Niklason, †Xenophon Papademetris, Douglas Rothman, Mark Saltzman, †Martin Schwartz, †Frederick Sigworth, †Albert Sinusas, †Brian Smith, Lawrence Staib, †Hemant Tagare, †Paul Van Tassel, Steven Zucker

Associate Professors †Joerg Bewersdorf, Stuart Campbell, †Daniel Coman, Tarek Famy, Rong Fan, †Gigi Galiana, Anjelica Gonzalez, †Michelle Hampson, †Henry Hsia, Farren Isaacs, †Chi Liu, Kathryn Miller-Jensen, †Dana Peters, †Corey Wilson, †Jiangbing Zhou

Assistant Professors †Nicha Dvornek, †Ansel Hillmer, Michael Mak, Michael Murrell, †Dustin Scheinost, Gregory Tietjen, †Steven Tommasini, †Daniel Wiznia

Lecturers †Liqiong Gui, †Jing Zhou

†A joint appointment with primary affiliation in another department or school.