Ancient Greek (GREK)

GREK 110a, Beginning Greek: The Elements of Greek GrammarStaff

Introduction to ancient Greek. Emphasis on morphology and syntax within a structured program of readings and exercises. Prepares for GREK 120. No prior knowledge of Greek assumed.  L11½ Course cr
MTWThF 9:25am-10:15am

GREK 120b, Beginning Greek: Review of Grammar and Selected ReadingsStaff

Continuation of GREK 110. Emphasis on consolidating grammar and on readings from Greek authors. The sequence GREK 110, 120 prepares for 131 or 141. Prerequisite: GREK 110 or equivalent.  L2RP1½ Course cr
HTBA

* GREK 125b, Intensive Beginning GreekStaff

An introduction to classical Greek for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Readings from Greek authors supplement intensive instruction in grammar and vocabulary. The course is intended to be of use to students with diverse academic backgrounds and interests. Prepares for GREK 131. Not open to students who have taken GREK 110, 120.  L1, L2RP2 Course cr
HTBA

GREK 131a, Greek Prose: An IntroductionStaff

Close reading of selections from classical Greek prose with review of grammar. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 141 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 9:25am-10:15am

GREK 141b, Homer: An IntroductionStaff

A first approach to reading Homeric poetry in Greek. Selected books of the Iliad or the Odyssey. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 131 or equivalent.  L3
HTBA

GREK 403a, The History and Structure of Ancient Greek: From Word to TextEgbert Bakker

An introduction to three essential aspects of Ancient Greek: (i) the structure of the word; (ii) the structure of sentences and clauses in the language; (iii) the structure of longer stretches of connected discourse. The first component (weeks 1-7) is a brief introduction into Into-European comparative-historical linguistics and will focus on the phonology and morphology of Greek verbs and nouns; the third component (weeks 8-13) is a systematic analysis of Greek prose, with detailed attention to the properties through which texts "cohere" (such as particles, deictics, and tenses); the second component is taught as part of each class meeting on the basis of translation-into-Greek ("composition") exercises. GREK 131 or equivalent. This course is open to all undergraduate students who are eligible to enroll in GREK 400-level courses. It is also required for graduate students in the Classical Philology track as per the current program.  L5, HU0 Course cr
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* GREK 419a, Helen After TroyPauline LeVen

Focus on the representation of Helen of Troy in Homer, Sappho, and other lyric poets. Readings from Gorgias's Encomium of Helen, Euripides' Helen, and Longus. Attention to problems of aesthetics, rhetoric, and poetics. L4 Greek or permission of the instructor.  L5
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* GREK 450b, EuripidesStaff

Close reading of Euripidean tragedy, varying by semester. Form and structure of tragedy; Euripides' literary and dramatic technique; issues of myth, geography, and cultural and personal identity; reception of tragedy in modernity. See notes below for which tragedy will be read.  L5, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

GREK 467a, Satires and Dialogues of LucianJohn Dillon

Close reading of selected satirical works and dialogues by Lucian of Samosata. Focus on grammar, syntax, and translation. Some attention to the teachings of competing philosophical schools, the culture of the Second Sophistic movement, and the nature of satire, rhetoric, and conversational dialogue. A bridge course between intermediate and advanced courses.  L5, HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

GREK 703a, The History and Structure of Ancient Greek: From Word to TextEgbert Bakker

This course provides a brief introduction to the comparative-historical study of Greek verbs and nouns; sentence-level grammatical training based on “composition” exercises; and awareness of “syntax beyond the sentence”: the linguistic means ancient Greek speakers and writers had at their disposal to create “cohesion” of their discourse as a means for the text to achieve its communicative or rhetorical goals. The course provides a thorough grounding in the structure of ancient Greek words, sentences, and texts. It fulfills the graduate course requirements for Greek prose composition and historical or comparative linguistics.
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

GREK 719a, Helen after TroyPauline LeVen

Focus on the representation of Helen of Troy in Homer, Sappho, and other lyric poets. Readings from Gorgias’s Encomium of Helen, Euripides’ Helen, and Longus. Attention to problems of aesthetics, rhetoric, and poetics.
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

GREK 750b, EuripidesStaff

Close reading of Euripidean tragedy, varying by semester. Form and structure of tragedy; Euripides’ literary and dramatic technique; issues of myth, geography, and cultural and personal identity; reception of tragedy in modernity.
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm