Jewish Studies (JDST)

* JDST 035a / HIST 023a / HUMS 036a / RLST 035a, JERUSALEM: Judaism, Christianity, IslamSarit Kattan Gribetz

The Old City of Jerusalem is just 0.35 square miles large, about half the size of Yale’s campus. Have you ever wondered what makes this tiny city so beloved to – and the object of continual strife for – Jews, Christians, and Muslims? Through engagement with a wide range of sources—including biblical lamentations, archeological excavations, qur’anic passages, exegetical materials, medieval pilgrim itineraries, legal documents, maps, poetry, art, architecture, and international political resolutions—students develop the historiographical tools and theoretical frameworks to study the history of one of the world’s most enduringly important and bitterly contested cities.  Students encounter persistent themes central to the identity of Jerusalem: geography and topography; exile, diaspora, and return; destruction and trauma; religious violence and war; practices of pilgrimage; social diversity; missionizing; the rise of nationalism; peace efforts; the ethics of storytelling; and the stakes of studying the past.  HURP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

JDST 200a / ER&M 219a / HIST 219a / MMES 149a / RLST 148a, Jews and the World: From the Bible through Early Modern TimesIvan Marcus

A broad introduction to the history of the Jews from biblical beginnings until the European Reformation and the Ottoman Empire. Focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationships among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jewish society and culture in its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval settings. Counts toward either European or non-Western distributional credit within the History major, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies.  HURP0 Course cr
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* JDST 270a / HIST 232Ja / HUMS 443a / MMES 342a / RLST 201a, Medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims In ConversationIvan Marcus

How members of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities thought of and interacted with members of the other two cultures during the Middle Ages. Cultural grids and expectations each imposed on the other; the rhetoric of otherness—humans or devils, purity or impurity, and animal imagery; and models of religious community and power in dealing with the other when confronted with cultural differences. Counts toward either European or Middle Eastern distributional credit within the History major, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies.  WR, HURP
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

JDST 289a / FILM 362a / FREN 384a / ITAL 384a / LITR 338a, Representing the HolocaustMaurice Samuels and Millicent Marcus

The Holocaust as it has been depicted in books and films, and as written and recorded by survivors in different languages including French and Italian. Questions of aesthetics and authority, language and its limits, ethical engagement, metaphors and memory, and narrative adequacy to record historical truth. Interactive discussions about films (Life Is Beautiful, Schindler's List, Shoah), novels, memoirs (Primo Levi, Charlotte Delbo, Art Spiegelman), commentaries, theoretical writings, and testimonies from Yale's Fortunoff Video Archive.  WR, HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* JDST 305a / HEBR 158a / MMES 168a, Contemporary Israeli Society in FilmShiri Goren

Examination of major themes in Israeli society through film, with emphasis on language study. Topics include migration, gender and sexuality, Jewish/Israeli identity, and private and collective memory. Readings in Hebrew and English provide a sociohistorical background and bases for class discussion. Prerequisites: HEBR 140 or permission of instructor.  L5, HURP
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* JDST 316a or b / ENGL 2415b / ENGL 456a / HUMS 427a or b / LITR 348a or b, The Practice of Literary TranslationStaff

This course combines a seminar on the history and theory of translation (Tuesdays) with a hands-on workshop (Thursdays). The readings lead us through a series of case studies comparing, on the one hand, multiple translations of given literary works and, on the other, classic statements about translation—by translators themselves and prominent theorists. We consider both poetry and prose from the Bible, selections from Chinese, Greek, and Latin verse, classical Arabic and Persian literature, prose by Cervantes, Borges, and others, and modern European poetry (including Pushkin, Baudelaire, and Rilke). Students are expected to prepare short class presentations, participate in a weekly workshop, try their hand at a series of translation exercises, and undertake an intensive, semester-long translation project. Proficiency in a foreign language is required. Previously ENGL 456.  HU
HTBA

* JDST 326a / LITR 317a, Marxist Theory of LiteratureHannan Hever

The role of Marxist thought in understanding literary institutions and texts in the twentieth century. Marx's theory of ideology; Lukacs's theory of literature as the basis for development of Marxist literary theory; the Frankfurt and materialistic schools. Readings include works by Raymond Williams, Catherine Belsey, Walter Benjamin, Pierre Macherey, and Frederic Jameson.  HU
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* JDST 343b / ENGL 3415b / HUMS 428b / LITR 305b, Advanced Literary TranslationRobyn Creswell

A sequel to LITR 348 or its equivalent, this course brings together advanced and seriously committed students of literary translation, especially (but not only) those who are doing translation-related senior theses. Students must apply to the class with a specific project in mind, that they have been developing or considering, and that they will present on a regular basis throughout the semester. Discussion of translations-in-progress are supplemented by short readings that include model works from the world of literary translation, among them introductions and pieces of criticism, as well as reflections by practitioners treating all phases of their art. The class is open to undergraduates and graduate students who have taken at least one translation workshop. By permission of the instructor. Formerly ENGL 483. Prerequisite: LITR 348.
HTBA

* JDST 345a / ENGL 431a, GhostwritingJoshua Cohen

This is a class about the process, politics, aesthetics, ethics, and psychology of ghostwriting -- that is, writing work that will appear under another person's name. Readings range from works of theory to popular works written by and about ghostwriters. Particular attention is paid to the psychological aspects of ghostwriting, and the resemblance of the ghoster-ghosted relationship to clinical talk therapy. Readings also address the image of the ghost in popular and political culture, including the image of the Jews, women, and the repressed Other. Students are expected to "ghost" passages in the voices of their classmates, as well as in the voices of prominent figures. Secondary topics include the phenomena of collective writing and human-AI collaboration. Academic integrity is enforced according to the rules and regulations established by the Yale College Writing Center.  WR, HU
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

JDST 346a / HIST 249a, Making European Culture Jewish: Five Media, 1780-1930Staff

This course studies the ways in which Jewish writers and artists turned European culture into Jewish culture, that is, how a minority group fashioned its own version of the majority culture. As European Jews encountered European culture and society, they had to grapple with a host of fundamental questions. What was Judaism and who were the Jews: a religion, a history, a culture, a nation? We examine the way in which writers and artists struggled with these issues in five media: memoir, theology, history, fiction, and painting, thereby creating Jewish versions first of Enlightenment, Romanticism, and realism (1780-1870) and then of nationalism, positivism, and modernism (1870-1930).    WR, HU0 Course cr
HTBA

* JDST 351a / HIST 268Ja / PLSC 466a / RLST 324a, The Global Right: From the French Revolution to the American InsurrectionElli Stern

This seminar explores the history of right-wing political thought from the late eighteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the role played by religious and pagan traditions. This course seeks to answer the question, what constitutes the right? What are the central philosophical, religious, and pagan, principles of those groups associated with this designation? How have the core ideas of the right changed over time? We do this by examining primary tracts written by theologians, political philosophers, and social theorists as well as secondary literature written by scholars interrogating movements associated with the right in America, Europe, Middle East and Asia. Though touching on specific national political parties, institutions, and think tanks, its focus is on mapping the intellectual overlap and differences between various right-wing ideologies. While the course is limited to the modern period, it adopts a global perspective to better understand the full scope of right-wing politics.  HU, SO
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* JDST 354b / HIST 244Jb / HUMS 202b, Modern Jewish Political Thought: Jewish Politics Through Texts, Philosophy, and HistoryDavid Sorkin

This course examines the canonical texts of modern Jewish political thinking from the seventeenth to the late twentieth century. Students engage with the major thinkers and major political movements of the period.  WR, HU
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* JDST 356a / GMAN 202 / LITR 342a / MMES 396, Introduction to Jewish LiteraturesHannan Hever

The course will explore Jewish poetics and identities through literary genres like novels, stories, poems, and legends written in Jewish languages such as Hebrew, Yiddish, and Ladino, and also, Jewish literatures written in French, German, Arabic, Russian, and Italian. The course emphasizes the literary and political contexts of the "Jewish Question" by reading texts written by Jews in the Middle East, North Africa, Europe, Israel, and the United States. The course begins with Jeremiah's prophecies, then explores the Mishnaic "Ethics of Our Fathers" and Hebrew poetry written by Medieval Jewish Spanish poets like Judah ha-Levi and Shmuel HaNagid. Among the authors we will discuss are Franz Kafka, Paul Celan, Edmond Jabès, Primo Levi, Philip Roth, and Israeli writers such as S. Y. Agnon, Shimon Ballas, Dalia Ravikovitz, and A.B. Yehoshua. The poetics of Jewish literatures will be studied alongside religion, ethnicity, class differences, diaspora, and family relationships, as well as gender issues, minorities, and nationalism.    HURP
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* JDST 364b, Translating JudaismPeter Cole

This course combines elements of a translation workshop and a seminar that focuses on the Jewish history of translation. We consider comparative renderings of key texts and secondary reflections on the process of translation itself—from Scripture (biblical prose and poetry) to medieval literature (religious, philosophical, and belletristic prose as well as poetry), and on to modern and contemporary fiction, non-fiction, religious texts, and poems. Students are required to have competence in at least one foreign (and preferably Jewish) language and to develop semester-long projects that are brought into the workshop part of the class on a regular basis.  Competence in at least one language apart from English. A working knowledge of Hebrew, Yiddish, or any other "Jewish language" is desirable, but not required.  HU
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* JDST 365b / HIST 170Jb, American Jewish Citizenship Politics, From Revolution to Civil RightsStaff

Through a survey of primary and secondary sources on American Jewish political history, this seminar course studies how Jews theorized and mobilized on behalf of their citizenship rights in the United States, from the colonial era through the early 1970s. Although Jews were legally granted full “emancipation” by the federal government in 1790, constant changes in the size and power of the American state—as well as in the makeup of America’s Jewish population itself—challenged the very meaning of what full citizenship entailed. Over the following two centuries, Jews’ social, economic, and political rights as citizens often remained in flux. As a result, a vast array of different Jewish individuals and organizations mobilized behind different political movements to bolster their continued rights as citizens in America.  WR, HU
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

JDST 407b / HEBR 161b / MMES 156b, Israeli Popular MusicDina Roginsky

Changes in the development of popular music in Israel explored as representations of changing Israeli society and culture. The interaction of music and cultural identity; modern popular music and social conventions; songs of commemoration and heroism; popular representation of the Holocaust; Mizrahi and Arab music; feminism, sexuality, and gender; class and musical consumption; criticism, protest, and globalization. Conducted in Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 140 or equivalent.  L5, SO
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* JDST 409a / HEBR 159a / MMES 159a, Conversational Hebrew: Israeli MediaShiri Goren

An advanced Hebrew course for students interested in practicing and enhancing conversational skills. Focus on listening comprehension and on various forms of discussion, including practical situations, online interactions, and content analysis. Prerequisite: HEBR 140 or permission of instructor.  L5RP
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* JDST 417b / HEBR 164b / MMES 167b, Biblical to Modern Hebrew for Reading KnowledgeDina Roginsky

Instruction in the linguistic needs of students who have reading knowledge of Biblical Hebrew but cannot read or converse in Modern Hebrew. Concentration on reading comprehension of Modern Hebrew for research purposes, particularly scholarly texts tailored to students’ areas of interest. Two years of Biblical or Modern Hebrew studies, or permission of the instructor.  RP
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

JDST 653a / ANTH 531a / CLSS 815a / EALL 773a / HIST 502a / HSAR 564a / NELC 533a / RLST 803a, Archaia Seminar: Law and Society in China and RomeNoel Lenski and Valerie Hansen

An introduction to the legal systems of the Roman and post-Roman states and Han- and Tang-dynasty China. Emphasis on developing collaborative partnerships that foster comparative history research. Readings in surviving law codes (in the original or English translation) and secondary studies on topics including slavery, trade, crime, and family. This course serves as an Archaia Core Seminar. It is connected with Archaia's Ancient Societies Workshop (ASW), which runs a series of events throughout the academic year related to the theme of the seminar. Students enrolled in the seminar must attend all ASW events during the semester in which the seminar is offered.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

JDST 695b / HEBR 563b, From Biblical to Modern HebrewDina Roginsky

This course aims to support students who have reading knowledge of Biblical Hebrew but cannot read or converse in Modern Hebrew. The course concentrates on reading and aims at enabling students to use Modern Hebrew for research purposes. The texts chosen are tailored to students’ particular areas of interest. Prerequisite: two years of Biblical or Modern Hebrew studies, or permission of the instructor. Conducted in English.
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

JDST 761a / HIST 596a / MDVL 596a / RLST 773a, Jews and the World: From the Bible through Early Modern TimesIvan Marcus

A broad introduction to the history of the Jews from biblical beginnings until the European Reformation and the Ottoman Empire. Focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationships among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jewish society and culture in its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval settings.
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

JDST 845a / RLST 643a, The Global Right: From the French Revolution to the American InsurrectionElli Stern

This seminar explores the history of right-wing political thought from the late eighteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the role played by religious and pagan traditions. This course seeks to answer the question, what constitutes the right? What are the central philosophical, religious, and pagan, principles of those groups associated with this designation? How have the core ideas of the right changed over time? We do this by examining primary tracts written by theologians, political philosophers, and social theorists as well as secondary literature written by scholars interrogating movements associated with the right in America, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. Though touching on specific national political parties, institutions, and think tanks, its focus is on mapping the intellectual overlap and differences between various right-wing ideologies. While the course is limited to the modern period, it adopts a global perspective to better understand the full scope of right-wing politics.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm