Mathematics (MATH)

* MATH 107a, Mathematics in the Real WorldMeghan Anderson

The use of mathematics to address real-world problems. Applications of exponential functions to compound interest and population growth; geometric series in mortgage payments, amortization of loans, present value of money, and drug doses and blood levels; basic probability, Bayes's rule, and false positives in drug testing; elements of logic. Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to 25 students who have not previously taken a high school or college calculus course.  QR
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

* MATH 110a, Introduction to Functions and Calculus IJohn Hall

Comprehensive review of precalculus, limits, differentiation and the evaluation of definite integrals, with applications. Precalculus and calculus topics are integrated. Emphasis on conceptual understanding and problem solving. Successful completion of MATH 110 and 111 is equivalent to MATH 112. No prior acquaintance with calculus is assumed; some knowledge of algebra and precalculus mathematics is helpful. The course includes mandatory weekly workshops, scheduled at the beginning of term. Placement into MATH 110 on the Mathematics placement exam is required. Enrollment in MATH 110 is through preference selection, except during April registration (where sections are open to everyone who has placement in the course).   QR
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* MATH 111b, Introduction to Functions and Calculus IIJohn Hall

Continuation of MATH 110. Comprehensive review of precalculus, limits, differentiation and evaluation of definite integrals, with applications. Precalculus and calculus topics are integrated. Emphasis on conceptual understanding and problem solving. Successful completion of both MATH 110 and 111 is equivalent to MATH 112. The course includes mandatory weekly workshops, scheduled at the beginning of term. Prerequisite: MATH 110. Enrollment in MATH 111 is through preference selection.   QR
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* MATH 112a or b, Calculus of Functions of One Variable IStaff

This course introduces the notions of derivative and of definite integral for functions of one variable, with some of their physical and geometrical motivation and interpretations. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an understanding of the concepts that underlie the subject, and on the use of those concepts in problem solving. This course also focuses on strategies for problem solving, communication and logical reasoning. Placement into MATH 112 on the Mathematics placement exam is required. No prior acquaintance with calculus or computing assumed. May not be taken after MATH 111. Enrollment in MATH 112 is through preference selection, except during April registration (where sections are open to everyone who has placement in the course).  QR
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* MATH 115a or b, Calculus of Functions of One Variable IIBrett Smith

A continuation of MATH 112, this course develops concepts and skills at the foundation of the STEM disciplines. In particular, we introduce Riemann sums, integration strategies, series convergence, and Taylor polynomial approximation. We use these tools to measure lengths of parametric curves, areas of polar regions and volumes of solids of revolution, and we explore applications of calculus to other disciplines including physics, economics, and statistics. MATH 115 also focuses on strategies for problem solving, communication, and logical reasoning. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or MATH 112, or placement into MATH 115 on the Mathematics placement exam. May not be taken after MATH 116. Enrollment in MATH 115 is through preference selection, except during April registration (in this case sections are open to everyone who has placement in the course).   QR
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* MATH 116a, Mathematical Models in the Biosciences I: Calculus TechniquesStaff

Techniques and applications of integration, approximation of functions by polynomials, modeling by differential equations. Introduction to topics in mathematical modeling that are applicable to biological systems. Discrete and continuous models of population, neural, and cardiac dynamics. Stability of fixed points and limit cycles of differential equations.  Prerequisite: MATH 112, or placement into MATH 115/116 on the Mathematics placement exam. May not be taken after MATH 115.  QR
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* MATH 118a or b, Introduction to Functions of Several VariablesStaff

A combination of linear algebra and differential calculus of several variables. Matrix representation of linear equations, Gauss elimination, vector spaces, independence, basis and dimension, projections, least squares approximation, and orthogonality. Three-dimensional geometry, functions of two and three variables, level curves and surfaces, partial derivatives, maxima and minima, and optimization. Intended for students in the social sciences, especially Economics. May not be taken after MATH 120 or 222. Prerequisite: MATH 112.  QR
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* MATH 120a or b, Calculus of Functions of Several VariablesStaff

Analytic geometry in three dimensions, using vectors. Real-valued functions of two and three variables, partial derivatives, gradient and directional derivatives, level curves and surfaces, maxima and minima. Parametrized curves in space, motion in space, line integrals; applications. Multiple integrals, with applications. Divergence and curl. The theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or 116, or placement into MATH 120 on the Mathematics placement exam. May not be taken after MATH 121. Enrollment in MATH 120 is through preference selection, except during April registration (where sections are open to everyone who has placement in the course).    QR
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* MATH 121b, Mathematical Models in the Biosciences II: Advanced TechniquesSamuel DeHority

Mathematical modeling for the biosciences, with a strong focus on multivariable calculus techniques. Applications may include epidemiological models, mathematical foundations of virus and antiviral dynamics, ion channel models and cardiac arrhythmias, and evolutionary models of disease. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or 116, or placement into MATH 120/121 on the Mathematics placement exam. May not be taken after MATH 120.   QR
TTh 9am-10:15am

* MATH 160b / AMTH 160b / S&DS 160b, The Structure of NetworksStaff

Network structures and network dynamics described through examples and applications ranging from marketing to epidemics and the world climate. Study of social and biological networks as well as networks in the humanities. Mathematical graphs provide a simple common language to describe the variety of networks and their properties.  QR
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MATH 222a or b / AMTH 222a or b, Linear Algebra with ApplicationsStaff

Matrix representation of linear equations. Gauss elimination. Vector spaces. Linear independence, basis, and dimension. Orthogonality, projection, least squares approximation; orthogonalization and orthogonal bases. Extension to function spaces. Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Diagonalization. Difference equations and matrix differential equations. Symmetric and Hermitian matrices. Orthogonal and unitary transformations; similarity transformations. Students who plan to continue with upper level math courses should instead consider MATH 225 or 226. After MATH 115 or equivalent. May not be taken after MATH 225 or 226.   QR
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MATH 225a or b, Linear AlgebraStaff

An introduction to the theory of vector spaces, matrix theory and linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, inner product spaces, spectral theorem. The course focuses on conceptual understanding and serves as an introduction to writing mathematical proofs. For an approach focused on applications rather than proofs, consider MATH 222. Students with a strong mathematical background or interest are encouraged to consider MATH 226. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent. May not be taken after MATH 222, 226, or 231.   QR
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* MATH 226a, Linear Algebra (Intensive)Ebru Toprak

A fast-paced introduction to the theory of vector spaces, matrix theory and linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, inner product spaces, spectral theorem. Topics are covered at a deeper level than in MATH 225, and additional topics may be covered, for example canonical forms or the classical groups. The course focuses on conceptual understanding. Familiarity with writing mathematical proofs is recommended. For a less intensive course, consider MATH 225. For an approach focused on applications, consider MATH 222. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent. May not be taken after MATH 222, 225, or 231.   QR
MWF 11:35am-12:25pm

MATH 232b / AMTH 232b, Advanced Linear Algebra with ApplicationsIan Adelstein

This course is a natural continuation of MATH 222. The core content includes eigenvectors and the Spectral Theorem for real symmetric matrices; singular value decomposition (SVD) and principle component analysis (PCA); quadratic forms, Rayleigh quotients and generalized eigenvalues. We also consider a number of applications: optimization and stochastic gradient descent (SGD); eigen-decomposition and dimensionality reduction; graph Laplacians and data diffusion; neural networks and machine learning. A main theme of the course is using linear algebra to learn from data. Students complete (computational) projects on topics of their choosing. Prerequisites: MATH 120 and MATH 222, 225, or 226. This is not a proof-based course. May not be taken after MATH 340 (previously MATH 240.   QR
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

MATH 241a / S&DS 241a, Probability TheoryHarrison Zhou

Introduction to probability theory. Topics include probability spaces, random variables, expectations and probabilities, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous distributions, central limit theorem, Markov chains, and probabilistic modeling. After or concurrently with MATH 120 or equivalent.  QR
MW 9am-10:15am

MATH 242b / S&DS 242b, Theory of StatisticsZhou Fan

Study of the principles of statistical analysis. Topics include maximum likelihood, sampling distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, tests of significance, regression, analysis of variance, and the method of least squares. Some statistical computing. After S&DS 241 and concurrently with or after MATH 222 or 225, or equivalents.  QR
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

MATH 244a or b / AMTH 244a or b, Discrete MathematicsStaff

Basic concepts and results in discrete mathematics: graphs, trees, connectivity, Ramsey theorem, enumeration, binomial coefficients, Stirling numbers. Properties of finite set systems. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent. Some prior exposure to proofs is recommended (ex. MATH 225).  QR
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MATH 246a or b, Ordinary Differential EquationsStaff

First-order equations, second-order equations, linear systems with constant coefficients. Numerical solution methods. Geometric and algebraic properties of differential equations. After MATH 120 or equivalent; after or concurrently with MATH 222 or 225 or 226 or equivalent.  QR
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MATH 247b / AMTH 247b, Intro to Partial Differential EquationsRuoyu Wang

Introduction to partial differential equations, wave equation, Laplace's equation, heat equation, method of characteristics, calculus of variations, series and transform methods, and numerical methods. Prerequisites: MATH 222 or 225 or 226, MATH 246 or ENAS 194 or equivalents.  QR
MWF 10:30am-11:20am

MATH 251b / EENG 434b / S&DS 351b, Stochastic ProcessesIlias Zadik

Introduction to the study of random processes including linear prediction and Kalman filtering, Poison counting process and renewal processes, Markov chains, branching processes, birth-death processes, Markov random fields, martingales, and random walks. Applications chosen from communications, networking, image reconstruction, Bayesian statistics, finance, probabilistic analysis of algorithms, and genetics and evolution. Prerequisite: S&DS 241 or equivalent.  QR
MW 1pm-2:15pm

MATH 255a or b, Analysis 1Staff

Introduction to Analysis. Properties of real numbers, limits, convergence of sequences and series. Power series, Taylor series, and the classical functions. Differentiation and Integration. Metric spaces. The course focuses on conceptual understanding. Familiarity with writing mathematical proofs is assumed, and is further developed in the course.  Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent, and MATH 225 or 226. May not be taken after MATH 256, 300, or 301.   QR
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* MATH 256b, Analysis 1 (Intensive)Staff

Fast-paced introduction to Analysis. Properties of real numbers, limits, convergence of sequences and series. Power series, Taylor series, and the classical functions. Differentiation and Integration. Metric spaces. The course focuses on conceptual understanding. Familiarity with writing mathematical proofs is assumed, and is further developed in the course. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent, and MATH 225 or 226. May not be taken after MATH 255, 300, or 301.   QR
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

MATH 270b, Set TheoryMeghan Anderson

Algebra of sets; finite, countable, and uncountable sets. Cardinal numbers and cardinal arithmetic. Order types and ordinal numbers. The axiom of choice and the well-ordering theorem. After MATH 120 or equivalent.  QR
TTh 9am-10:15am

MATH 302a or b, Vector Analysis and Integration on ManifoldsStaff

A rigorous treatment of the modern toolkit of multivariable calculus. Differentiation and integration in R^n. Inverse function theorem. Fubini's theorem. Multilinear algebra and differential forms. Manifolds in R^n. Generalized Stokes' Theorem. The course focuses on conceptual structure and proofs, and serves as a gateway to more advanced courses which use the language of manifolds.  Prerequisites: MATH 225 or 226, and MATH 255 or 256.  QR
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MATH 305b, Analysis 2: Lebesgue Integration and Fourier SeriesSebastian Hurtado - Salazar

The Lebesgue integral, Fourier series, applications to differential equations. Prerequisites: MATH 225 or 226, and MATH 255 or 256 or 301. With permission of instructor, may be taken after MATH 225 or 226, and MATH 231 or 250.  QR
MW 1pm-2:15pm

MATH 310a, Introduction to Complex AnalysisKa Ho Wong

An introduction to the theory and applications of functions of a complex variable. Differentiability of complex functions. Complex integration and Cauchy's theorem. Series expansions. Calculus of residues. Conformal mapping. Prerequisites: MATH 225 or 226 or 231, and MATH 255 or 256 or 230 or 250, and MATH 302 or 120.   QR
MW 9am-10:15am

* MATH 315b, Intermediate Complex AnalysisRichard Kenyon

Continuation of MATH 310. Topics may include argument principle, Rouché's theorem, Hurwitz theorem, Runge's theorem, analytic continuation, Schwarz reflection principle, Jensen's formula, infinite products, Weierstrass theorem. Functions of finite order, Hadamard's theorem, meromorphic functions. Mittag-Leffler's theorem, subharmonic functions. After MATH 310.  QR
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MATH 320a, Measure Theory and IntegrationCharles Smart

Construction and limit theorems for measures and integrals on general spaces; product measures; Lp spaces; integral representation of linear functionals. After MATH 305 or equivalent.  QR
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* MATH 325b, Introduction to Functional AnalysisHanwen Zhang

Hilbert, normed, and Banach spaces; geometry of Hilbert space, Riesz-Fischer theorem; dual space; Hahn-Banach theorem; Riesz representation theorems; linear operators; Baire category theorem; uniform boundedness, open mapping, and closed graph theorems. After MATH 320, or after MATH 305 with permission of instructor.   QR
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

MATH 330a / S&DS 400a, Advanced ProbabilitySekhar Tatikonda

Measure theoretic probability, conditioning, laws of large numbers, convergence in distribution, characteristic functions, central limit theorems, martingales. Some knowledge of real analysis assumed.  QR
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

MATH 340b, Advanced Linear AlgebraMinh-Tam Trinh

The course continues the study of linear algebra from MATH 225 or MATH 230/231. It discusses several aspects of linear algebra that are of crucial importance for the subject and its applications to abstract algebra, geometry and number theory. Topics include generalized eigenspaces and Jordan normal form theorem, dual vector spaces, bilinear and hermitian forms, symmetric and hermitian operators,  Hom spaces and tensor products. Previously MATH 240. After MATH 225 or 226 or 231. Two semesters of proof-based mathematics courses are recommended. 
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* MATH 345a, Modern CombinatoricsNicholas Ovenhouse

Recent developments and important questions in combinatorics. Relations to other areas of mathematics such as analysis, probability, and number theory. Topics include probabilistic method, random graphs, random matrices, pseudorandomness in graph theory and number theory, Szemeredi's theorem and lemma, and Green-Tao's theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 244.  QR
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

MATH 350a or b, Introduction to Abstract AlgebraStaff

Group theory: isomorphism theorems, subgroups and quotient groups, group actions, Sylow theorems, direct and semidirect products. Ring theory: ideals and quotient rings, Euclidean domains, principal ideal domains, unique factorization domains. Prerequisites: one term of linear algebra and two terms of proof-based mathematics courses. (For example, MATH 225 and 255, or MATH 225 and 244.)   QR
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MATH 353b, Introduction to Representation TheoryIgor Frenkel

An introduction to basic ideas and methods of representation theory of finite groups and Lie groups. Examples include permutation groups and general linear groups. Connections with symmetric functions, geometry, and physics. After MATH 350.
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

MATH 360a, Introduction to Lie GroupsYair Minsky

Lie groups as the embodiment of the idea of continuous symmetry. The exponential map on matrices and applications; spectral theory; examples and structure of Lie groups and Lie algebras; connections with geometry and physics. After MATH 350 and MATH 302. With permission of instructor, may be taken after Math 350 and Math 231 or 250.   QR
TTh 9am-10:15am

MATH 370b, Fields and Galois TheoryMiki Havlickova

Galois theory studies the correspondence between group theory and the theory of fields. The topics will include finite and infinite fields, their extensions and automorphisms, as well as applications such as solvability of equations by radicals or constructions with ruler and compass. The course is a direct continuation of MATH 350.  After MATH 350.  QR
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

MATH 380a, AlgebraJunliang Shen

The course serves as an introduction to commutative algebra and category theory. Topics include commutative rings, their ideals and modules, Noetherian rings and modules, constructions with rings, such as localization and integral extension, connections to algebraic geometry, categories, functors and functor morphisms, tensor product and Hom functors, projective modules. Other topics may be discussed at instructor's discretion.  After MATH 350 and 370.  QR
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

MATH 430b, Introduction to TopologyMinh-Tam Trinh

The theory of fundamental groups and covering spaces, with particular reference to two-dimensional manifolds. Prerequisites: MATH 350, and MATH 255 or 256 or 300 or 301.   QR
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

MATH 447a / AMTH 447a, Partial Differential EquationsJohn Schotland

Introduction to partial differential equations, wave equation, Laplace's equation, heat equation, method of characteristics, calculus of variations, series and transform methods, and numerical methods. Prerequisites: MATH 305
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

MATH 470a or b, Individual StudiesMiki Havlickova

Individual investigation of an area of mathematics outside of those covered in regular courses, involving directed reading, discussion, and either papers or an examination. A written plan of study approved by the student's adviser and the director of undergraduate studies is required. The course may normally be elected for only one term.
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MATH 475a or b, Senior EssayMiki Havlickova

Interested students may write a senior essay under the guidance of a faculty member, and give an oral report to the department. Students wishing to write a senior essay should consult the director of undergraduate studies at least one semester in advance of the semester in which they plan to write the essay. 
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* MATH 480a or b, Senior Seminar: Mathematical TopicsStaff

A number of mathematical topics are chosen each term—e.g., differential topology, Lie algebras, mathematical methods in physics—and explored in one section of the seminar. Students give several presentations on the chosen topic.  Available for credit only to seniors majoring in Mathematics, Economics and Mathematics, or Mathematics and Philosophy, for the purpose of fulfilling the senior requirement. 
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* MATH 481b, Senior Seminar: Topics in Economics and MathematicsPei-Chun Su

A number of topics at the intersection of economics and mathematics are chosen each term—e.g., the theory of networks, market design and equilibrium, information economics and probability —and explored in the seminar. Students present several talks on the chosen topic. This section is devoted to topics of interest to majors in Economics or Mathematics majors, and in particular to students in the joint major Economics and Mathematics. The seminar is co-taught by a member of the Economics Department. Available for credit only to seniors majoring in Mathematics, Economics and Mathematics, or Mathematics and Philosophy, for the purpose of fulfilling the senior requirement. 
MW 4pm-5:15pm

* MATH 482a, Senior Seminar: Math Education TopicsMiki Havlickova

The goal of the seminar is to explore topics of mathematics education at the college level, and work on presentation and teaching skills that can be useful in the classroom and in other settings. Everyone has several opportunities to practice teaching in the seminar, with guidance about explaining new material, choosing examples, implementing active learning strategies, and other skills. In other lessons, we discuss papers on pedagogy and classroom case studies. We also have sessions on public speaking, belonging in math, grading, and other topics relevant to mathematics instruction. The course is open to students in any major. It cannot be used as a mathematics elective. Seniors majoring in Mathematics or Mathematics + Philosophy may use the seminar to fulfill the senior requirement. In the pilot year, enrollment will be limited to 12 students, selected through an application process during April registration. MATH 225 or MATH 226, and MATH 255 or MATH 256
TTh 1pm-2:15pm