Classics

Director of undergraduate studies: Pauline LeVen, 305 Phelps, 432-0983, pauline.leven@yale.edu; classics.yale.edu

FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS

Professors Egbert Bakker, Victor Bers, Kirk Freudenburg, Emily Greenwood, Verity Harte, Brad Inwood, Diana Kleiner, Christina Kraus, Noel Lenski, Joseph Manning

Associate Professors Milette Gaifman, Pauline LeVen, Irene Peirano Garrison

Assistant Professor Andrew Johnston

Lecturers Ann Ellis Hanson, Susan Matheson, Timothy Robinson, Barbara Shailor, Joseph Solodow

Visiting Lecturer Jessica Lamont

The Department of Classics offers a major in Classics, concentrating in either Greek or Latin literature, or in both literatures; a major in Classical Civilization; and, in conjunction with the Hellenic Studies program, a major in Ancient and Modern Greek. The diversity of subject matter covered by these majors makes Classics an excellent partner in interdepartmental major programs.

Placement policy Students are encouraged to take courses as advanced as they can handle with profit and pleasure. The department, recognizing the great variety of preparation in ancient languages, wishes to accommodate incoming students in as flexible a manner as possible. Students who plan either to begin or to continue the study of Greek or Latin should consult members of the departmental faculty as soon as practicable.

Students who have had the equivalent of two years of college-level instruction may try a 400-level course. It is possible to take GREK 141 or LATN 141 after a 400-level course, or to be admitted to a 400-level course after completion of GREK 131 or LATN 131. Freshmen are encouraged to take advantage of the initial course selection period before course schedules are due to find the most appropriate course.

The Major in Classics

The major in Classics is primarily a liberal arts major. It provides a rigorous interdisciplinary education in the literature, material culture, and history that underlie Western civilization and other humanities disciplines; it can also provide foundational disciplinary expertise for students who wish to do professional graduate work. Students develop a mastery of the classical languages, become acquainted with important periods and major authors in Greek and Roman literature, and develop the linguistic, historical, and theoretical interpretative tools to analyze classical antiquity and its relevance in the modern world. All courses in the department emphasize a combination of precise analysis, original thought, creativity, and breadth of historical inquiry. Courses in other literatures, in history, and in philosophy are strongly recommended for students enrolled in the Classics major.

The candidate for the Classics major may elect either the standard or the intensive major. In both of these majors the department recognizes two kinds of concentration, one aiming at knowledge of both ancient literatures, the other concentrating on either Greek or Latin literature.

The standard major A standard major in both literatures requires no fewer than ten term courses. These include six term courses in Greek and Latin at the level of 390 or above, a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256), a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257), and two additional courses in related areas of history and art. The language courses must include GREK 390 or LATN 390 and five term courses at the level of 400 or above. One of the additional courses in a related field must be a term course in ancient history, and the other must be a term course in ancient history, classical art and archaeology, or classical civilization.

Students majoring in one literature (Greek or Latin) are required to take no fewer than ten term courses. These include six term courses in that literature at the level of 390 or above, a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256), a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257), a term course in ancient history related to the chosen literature, and an additional term course in ancient history, classical art and archaeology, or classical civilization. The language courses must include GREK 390 or LATN 390 and at least five term courses at the level of 400 or above. Students are encouraged to do some work in the second language and may substitute two terms at the intermediate level (131 and 141) in the second language for two 400-level courses in the major literature.

Senior requirement At the end of the senior year the student majoring in both literatures takes a comprehensive examination in the history of Greek and Latin literature and in translation of both languages; the student majoring in one literature takes a senior departmental examination in the history of the literature of the major and in translation of that literature.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

The intensive major Students who desire a larger measure of independence than the standard major offers may elect the intensive major. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the standard major (in both literatures, in Greek, or in Latin), students in the intensive major write a senior essay under the regular guidance of a faculty adviser. Students may write a one-term essay in either the fall or spring (CLSS 492), or they may write a two-term essay (CLSS 490 and 491) starting in the fall of their senior year. A brief prospectus of the essay must be submitted, preferably at the end of the junior year and in no case later than September 2 of the senior year. The candidate must submit two copies of the senior essay to the director of undergraduate studies no later than December 9 (CLSS 492) or April 21 (CLSS 490, 491 or 492) of the senior year.

Combined B.A./M.A. degree program Exceptionally able and well-prepared students may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. See "Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" under section K, Special Arrangements, in the Academic Regulations. Interested students should consult the director of undergraduate studies prior to the sixth term of enrollment for specific requirements in Classics.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 10 term courses

Specific courses required GREK 390 or LATN 390; CLCV 256 and 257

Distribution of coursesTwo literatures—6 courses in both langs at level 390 or above, with at least 5 at 400 level or above; 1 course in ancient hist; 1 addtl course in ancient hist, classical art and archaeology, or classical civ; One literature—6 courses in lit at level 390 or above, with at least 5 at 400 level or above; 1 course in ancient hist related to lit of major; 1 addtl course in ancient hist, classical art and archaeology, or classical civ

Substitution permitted One literature—2 courses in the other lit numbered 131 or higher for 2 courses in major lit at 400 level

Senior requirementTwo literatures—senior dept exam in hist and translation of Greek and Latin lit; One literature—senior dept exam in hist and translation of major lit

Intensive major Senior essay (CLSS 490, 491 or CLSS 492) in addition to above


The Major in Classical Civilization

The major in Classical Civilization is designed to offer students an opportunity to study an entire Western civilization in its many diverse but related aspects. The literature, history, philosophy, religion, art, archaeology, and other aspects of Greek and Roman antiquity from the earliest beginnings in Greece to the Middle Ages are studied for their intrinsic artistic value, their historical significance, and their power to illuminate problems confronting contemporary societies. Each year, the department offers courses that focus on ways that subsequent ages have used and made sense of classical antiquity. Ancient texts are studied primarily in translation, though under the guidance of instructors who have expertise in Greek and Latin.

Candidates for the major complete at least twelve term courses (including the senior seminar) in Classics and related departments. Of these, two must be in ancient history and/or classical art and archaeology; and two must be in Greek or Latin, or both, numbered 131 or higher (the latter courses should be completed by the end of the junior year). Students must also take a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256) and a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257). It is strongly recommended that candidates elect one course each in the general areas of ancient epic, drama, philosophy, Roman civilization, and the classical tradition. Candidates for the major are encouraged to take related courses in other departments.

Senior requirement Students research and complete an original research project, usually an essay, under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students choose either a two-term senior project for two course credits (CLCV 450, 451) or a one-term senior project for one course credit (CLCV 452). A brief prospectus of the project must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies, preferably at the end of the junior year and in no case later than September 2 of the senior year. The completed project must be submitted to the department no later than December 9 (CLCV 452) or April 21 (CLCV 450, 451 or CLCV 452) of the senior year. If the student has written an essay, two copies are required.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

Approval of schedules Programs for all majors must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 12 term courses (incl two-term senior sem)

Specific courses requiredCLCV 256 and 257

Distribution of courses 2 courses in ancient hist and/or classical art and archaeology; 2 courses in Greek or Latin (or both) numbered 131 or higher

Senior requirement Senior project (CLCV 450, 451 or CLCV 452)


The Major in Ancient and Modern Greek

The major in Ancient and Modern Greek offers students an opportunity to integrate the study of postclassical Greek language, history, and culture with the departmental program in ancient Greek and classical civilization. The major covers Hellenic civilization from the Bronze Age to the modern day, and traces the development of the language and the culture across traditionally drawn boundaries. The study of both ancient and modern Greek allows the student to appreciate how familiarity with one enriches understanding of the other, and to chart the development of a language which has one of the oldest continuous written traditions in the world. The literature, history, philosophy, religion, and art of the ancient Greek and Greco-Roman worlds are studied both as ends in themselves and also as a foundation for appreciating later (medieval, Ottoman, and modern) developments in these areas. Students are encouraged to develop a sense of the continuity of Greek language and culture, and an understanding of how Byzantine and modern forms relate to their ancient forebears.

The standard major The major in Ancient and Modern Greek requires at least ten term courses. These include four term courses at the level of 390 or above in ancient Greek, a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256), a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257), and one term course in ancient Greek history. The language courses should include GREK 390. Candidates are encouraged to take a wide range of courses in the areas of ancient philosophy, religion, art, and architecture. In addition, no fewer than two term courses in modern Greek must be elected at the intermediate level (MGRK 130, 140) or above, as well as at least one additional term course in the history, art history, literature, or culture of the Greek-speaking Balkans or the Hellenic diaspora in the medieval, Ottoman, or modern period.

Senior requirement At the end of the senior year the student takes a comprehensive examination in the history of Greek literature.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

The intensive major Students who desire a larger measure of independence than the standard major offers may elect the intensive major. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the standard major, students in the intensive major write a senior essay under the regular guidance of a faculty adviser. Students may write a one-term essay in the fall or spring (CLSS 492), or they may write a two-term essay starting in the fall of their senior year (CLSS 490 and 491). A brief prospectus of the essay must be submitted, preferably at the end of the junior year and in no case later than September 2 of the senior year. The candidate must submit two copies of the senior essay to the director of undergraduate studies no later than December 9 (CLSS 492) or April 21 (CLSS 490, 491, or CLSS 492) of the senior year.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 10 term courses

Specific courses required GREK 390; CLCV 256 and 257

Distribution of courses 4 term courses in ancient Greek numbered 390 or higher; 1 term course in ancient Greek hist; 2 term courses in modern Greek numbered 130 or higher; 1 term course in postclassical Greek hist or culture

Senior requirement Senior dept exam

Intensive major Senior essay (CLSS 490, 491 or CLSS 492) in addition to above

Greek

GREK 110a, Beginning Greek: The Elements of Greek Grammar Noreen Sit

Introduction to ancient Greek. Emphasis on morphology and syntax within a structured program of readings and exercises. Prepares for GREK 120. No prior knowledge of Greek assumed.  L1RP1½ Course cr

GREK 120b, Beginning Greek: Review of Grammar and Selected Readings Niek Janssen

Continuation of GREK 110. Emphasis on consolidating grammar and on readings from Greek authors. The sequence GREK 110, 120 prepares for 131 or 141. Prerequisite: GREK 110 or equivalent.  L2RP1½ Course cr

* GREK 125b, Intensive Beginning Greek Timothy Robinson

An introduction to classical Greek for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Readings from Greek authors supplement intensive instruction in grammar and vocabulary. The course is intended to be of use to students with diverse academic backgrounds and interests. Prepares for GREK 131. Not open to students who have taken GREK 110, 120.  L1, L2RP2 Course cr

GREK 131a, Greek Prose: An Introduction Jennifer Weintritt

Close reading of selections from classical Greek prose with review of grammar. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 141 or equivalent.  L3

GREK 141b, Homer: An Introduction Egbert Bakker

A first approach to reading Homeric poetry in Greek. Selected books of the Iliad or the Odyssey. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 131 or equivalent.  L3

GREK 390a, Greek Syntax and Stylistics Victor Bers

A review of accidence and syntax, elementary composition, and analysis of Greek prose styles of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C., including a comparison of "prosaic" and "poetic" syntax. Prerequisite: previous familiarity with some Greek prose beyond the elementary level, or permission of instructor.  L5, HU

* GREK 419b, Helen After Troy Pauline LeVen

Focus on the representation of Helen of Troy in Homer, Sappho, and other lyric poets. Readings from Gorgias's Encomium of Helen, Euripides' Helen, and Longus. Attention to problems of aesthetics, rhetoric, and poetics. L4 Greek or permission of the instructor.  L5

* GREK 451a, Herodotus Andrew Johnston

Introduction to selected works of Herodotus in Greek, with attention to grammar, dialect, and structure. Discussion of the author's historical methods and of other issues in secondary scholarship.  L5, HU

GREK 461a, Ancient Greek Wisdom Poetry Egbert Bakker

Selections from the corpus of archaic Greek elegy (Solon, Theognis) and didactic poetry (Hesiod, Works and Days).  L5, HU

Latin

LATN 110a, Beginning Latin: The Elements of Latin Grammar Staff

Introduction to Latin. Emphasis on morphology and syntax within a structured program of readings and exercises. Prepares for LATN 120. No prior knowledge of Latin assumed. Preregistration, which is required, takes place at the Academic Fair. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the departmental Web site for details about preregistration.  L1RP1½ Course cr

LATN 120b, Beginning Latin: Review of Grammar and Selected Readings Staff

Continuation of LATN 110. Emphasis on consolidating grammar and on readings from Latin authors. The sequence LATN 110, 120 prepares for 131 or 141. Prerequisite: LATN 110 or equivalent.  L2RP1½ Course cr

LATN 131a, Latin Prose: An Introduction Staff

Close reading of a major work of classical prose; review of grammar as needed. Counts as L4 if taken after LATN 141 or equivalent.  L3

LATN 141b, Latin Poetry: An Introduction Kyle Conrau-Lewis

The course is devoted to Vergil. Counts as L4 if taken after LATN 131 or equivalent.  L3

* LATN 390b, Latin Syntax and Stylistics Joseph Solodow

A systematic review of syntax and an introduction to Latin style. Selections from Latin prose authors are read and analyzed, and students compose short pieces of Latin prose. For students with some experience reading Latin literature who desire a better foundation in forms, syntax, idiom, and style.  L5, HU

LATN 412b, Roman Myth and Pastoral Jennifer Weintritt

A perspective on the lengthy period of civil war during the last years of the Roman Republic, with emphasis on literary responses rather than the historical events themselves. On the one hand, a turn to Rome's earliest legendary history (Livy, History, Book I); on the other, a flight to the imaginary realm of pastoral (Virgil, Eclogues). A bridge course between L4 and other L5 courses.  L5

* LATN 421b, Vergil's Aeneid Christina Kraus

An in-depth study of Vergil's Aeneid within its political context.  L5

LATN 424a, Latin Lyric Christina Kraus and Yunfeng Lin

Reading and analysis of selections from the canon of Latin lyric poetry. Focus on Horace's Odes, with some attention to his Epodes and to works by Catullus and lesser-known Republican poets. Emphasis on literary interpretation.  L5

* LATN 426a, Lucretius the Epicurean Versus Seneca the Stoic Joseph Solodow

Lucretius's De Rerum Natura and selected letters and essays of Seneca, as representatives of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophies, respectively. Studied from the twin perspectives of literature and philosophy, with attention to historical background and social context. LATN 131, 141 or equivalent.  L5, HU

* LATN 463a, Ciceronian Invective Irene Peirano

A close reading of Cicero's Philippic 2 and selections from the In Pisonem; selected readings from other representatives of the genre of Roman invective. Emphasis on Cicero's language, style, and rhetorical technique, and on invective as a literary genre.  L5

* LATN 485b, Poetry and Monarchy at Rome Andrew Johnston

The monarchy at Rome from the Augustan age through late antiquity, as illuminated by the writings of poets who variously flattered and subverted the “principes” and emperors, collaborating with their ideological programs or problematizing their position within the republic. Study of bucolic, epic, didactic, panegyric, epigram, and lyric poetry from the ages of Augustus, of the Flavians, and of Theodosius. Topics include questions of tradition and innovation, further voices, society and patronage, and revision and erasure.  successful completion of L3 or L4 Latin (or the equivalent), for some students the L5 Latin bridge course will be recommended.    L5

* LATN 494a, Independent Tutorial in Latin Language and Literature Pauline LeVen

For students with advanced Latin language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered in courses. The work should result in a term paper or examination. A limited number of these courses may be offered toward the major. Offered subject to faculty availability.

Classics

* CLSS 401a, Introduction to Latin Paleography N. Raymond Clemens

Latin paleography from the fourth century C.E. to c. 1500, based on primary source materials in the Beinecke Library. The development of letter forms and abbreviations; the cultures that produced various genres of books in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Class transcriptions of ancient, medieval, and humanistic texts. 

* CLSS 402b, Advanced Latin Paleography Barbara Shailor

The challenges of using hand-produced Latin manuscripts in research, with an emphasis on texts from the late Middle Ages. Gothic cursive scripts and bookhands c. 1200–c. 1500; fragments of unidentified codices; complex or composite codices with heavy interlinear and marginal annotations. Manuscripts and fragments selected largely from collections in the Beinecke Library. Prerequisite: CLSS 401 or permission of instructor.  L5, HU

* CLSS 405b, Greek Papyrology Ann Hanson

Literary and documentary papyri of Greek and Roman Egypt, concentrating on documents housed in the Beinecke Library from the late Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Topics include using papyri as sources for social and other histories; gaining familiarity with the language of the papyri; and the reading of literary and documentary hands. Prerequisites: proficiency in Greek; reading knowledge of German and French.  L5, HU

* CLSS 490a and CLSS 491b, Two-Term Senior Essay for the Intensive Major in Classics Pauline LeVen

Qualified students may write a two-term senior essay in ancient literature or classical archaeology under the guidance of a faculty adviser. A written statement of purpose must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.

CLSS 492a or b, One-Term Senior Essay for the Intensive Major in Classics Pauline LeVen

Qualified students may write a one-term senior essay in ancient literature or classical archaeology under the guidance of a faculty adviser. A written statement of purpose must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.

Classical Civilization

* CLCV 020a, The Arts of Persuasion Egbert Bakker

Introduction to the theory and practice of rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome. Analysis of rhetoric's role in American history and society, using insights from the study of ancient rhetoric. Students write their own speeches to be delivered in class. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

* CLCV 042b, Magic, Witchcraft, and Mystery Cults in Classical Antiquity Jessica Lamont

Exploration of evidence for magic, witchcraft, and the occult in Greco-Roman antiquity. Topics include theoretical approaches to magic, magical objects (curse tablets, voodoo dolls, and amulets), practitioners of magic (witches and sorcerers), magical spells, and charms. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  HU

* CLCV 065a / EDST 065a, Education and Learning in Antiquity Sarah Insley Say

Exploration of educational systems in antiquity, from ideals of education in the Athenian polis to the fusion of classical and Christian models of education in the later Roman Empire. Topics include pedagogical methods and texts, evolution of “school” as an institution, ancient theories of education, and the impact of ancient educational systems on society at large. Course readings combine recent scholarship on ancient education and primary sources in translation. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  WR, HU

CLCV 125a / PHIL 125a, Introduction to Ancient Philosophy Brad Inwood

An introduction to ancient philosophy, beginning with the earliest pre-Socratics, concentrating on Plato and Aristotle, and including a brief foray into Hellenistic philosophy. Intended to be taken in conjunction with PHIL 126.  HU

CLCV 134b / HIST 208b / HSHM 278b, Ancient Greek Medicine and Healing Jessica Lamont

An introduction to Greek medicine and healing practices from the fifth century BCE to the second century CE, with attention to central concepts, methods, and theories. The relation of scientific theories to clinical practice, magic, temple medicine, and Greek philosophy are considered.  HU

CLCV 161b / ARCG 161b / HSAR 247b, Art and Myth in Greek Antiquity Milette Gaifman

Visual exploration of Greek mythology through the study of ancient Greek art and architecture. Greek gods, heroes, and mythological scenes foundational to Western culture; the complex nature of Greek mythology; how art and architecture rendered myths ever present in ancient Greek daily experience; ways in which visual representations can articulate stories. Use of collections in the Yale University Art Gallery.  HU

CLCV 170a / ARCG 170a / ARCG 250 / HSAR 250a, Roman Art: Empire, Identity, and Society Diana Kleiner

Masterpieces of Roman art from the Republic to Constantine studied in their historical and social contexts. The great Romans and the monuments they commissioned—portraits, triumphal arches, columns, and historical reliefs. The concept of empire and imperial identity, politics and portraiture, the making and unmaking of history through art, and the art of women, children, freedmen, and slaves.  HU

CLCV 175b / ARCG 252b / HSAR 252b, Roman Architecture Diana Kleiner

The great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Study of city planning and individual monuments and their decoration, including mural painting. Emphasis on developments in Rome, Pompeii, and central Italy; survey of architecture in the provinces.  HU

CLCV 205a / HIST 205a / HUMS 143, Introduction to Ancient Greek History Jessica Lamont

Introduction to Greek history, tracing the development of Greek civilization as manifested in the political, military, intellectual, and creative achievements from the Bronze Age through the end of the Classical period. Students read original sources in translation as well as secondary scholarship to better understand the rise and fall of the ancient Greeks—the civilization at the very heart of Western Civilization.   HU

* CLCV 212b / HUMS 145b, Ancient Greek and Roman Novels in Context Pauline LeVen

A thorough examination of ancient novels as ancestors to the modern novel. Focus on seven surviving Greek and Roman novels, with particular emphasis on questions of interpretation, literary criticism, and literary theory, as well as cultural issues raised by the novels, including questions of gender and sexuality, ethnicity, cultural identity, religion, and intellectual culture of the first centuries A.D.  WR, HU

* CLCV 216b / LITR 239b / MGRK 216b / WGSS 209b, Dionysus in Modernity George Syrimis

Modernity's fascination with the myth of Dionysus. Questions of agency, identity and community, and psychological integrity and the modern constitution of the self. Manifestations of Dionysus in literature, anthropology, and music; the Apollonian-Dionysiac dichotomy; twentieth-century variations of these themes in psychoanalysis, surrealism, and magical realism.  HUTr

* CLCV 230b / ARCG 424b / HSAR 424b, eClavdia: Women in Ancient Rome Diana Kleiner

The contributions of Roman women to one of the greatest cities—and one of the greatest empires—in world history. Lost stories of real-life Roman women recovered from public and residential buildings, portraits, paintings, and other works of Roman art and architecture.  HURP

CLCV 236b / HIST 225b, Roman Law Noel Lenski

Basic principles of Roman law and their applications to the social and economic history of antiquity and to the broader history of international law. Topics include the history of persons and things, inheritance, crime and tort, and legal procedure. Questions of social and economic history and the history of jurisprudence from the fifth century B.C.E. to the present.  HU

CLCV 241a / ARCG 241a / HSAR 241a / HUMS 226a, The Greek Nude and Ideals in Art Milette Gaifman

Survey of ancient Greek art, in particular, representation of the nude body from the seventh century B.C. through modernity. Masterpieces such as Discus Thrower and Venus de Milo, and Michelangelo’s David or Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus, present fundamental distinctions between naturalism, realism, and idealism and the lasting impact of the Greek nude beyond antiquity. Focus on heroic nudity, the relationship between athleticism and visual arts, how male and female bodies are treated differently, and what constitutes ideal beauty. Use of collections in the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art.  HU

CLCV 245b / HIST 207b, The Invention of History in Antiquity Andrew Johnston

Exploration of Greek and Roman constructions and representations of the past from the earliest works of classical literature through the rise of Christianity. Topics include: science and history as objects of inquiry; geography, ethnography, and writing about "the Other;" the role of myth and fiction; orality and social memory; monuments and texts; autobiography and self-representation; propaganda and politics; chronology and chronography; teleology, prophesy, and Christian histories.   WR, HU

* CLCV 260a / NELC 168a, The Origins of Writing Christina Geisen and Agnete Lassen

Exploration of writing in the ancient Near East and the profound effects this new method of communication had on human society. Focus on Egypt and Mesopotamia, where advanced writing systems first developed and were used for millennia.  none  HU

CLCV 261b / PHIL 200b, Plato Verity Harte

Focus on the central philosophical themes in the work of Plato and on methodology for studying Plato. Some prior philosophical study of Plato is recommended, such as PHIL/CLCV 125 or DRST 003.  HU

* CLCV 319b / HIST 242Jb / MGRK 300b / WGSS 293b, The Olympic Games, Ancient and Modern George Syrimis

Introduction to the history of the Olympic Games from antiquity to the present. The mythology of athletic events in ancient Greece and the ritual, political, and social ramifications of the actual competitions. The revival of the modern Olympic movement in 1896, the political investment of the Greek state at the time, and specific games as they illustrate the convergence of athletic cultures and sociopolitical transformations in the twentieth century.  HU

* CLCV 409b / PHIL 409b, Plato's Philebus Verity Harte

Discussion of Plato’s Philebus (in translation), the late work in which he examines the competing claims of pleasure and reason to be the basis of human happiness and in which he provides a portrait of the best human life. One course in ancient philosophy and at least one additional philosophy course. Preference given to senior majors in Philosophy and Classics.  HU

* CLCV 420b / PHIL 407b, The Central Books of Aristotle's Metaphysics David Charles

Examination of Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Discussion of substance and essence in the central books, Z, H, and Θ and assessment of recent attempts to interpret his account.   Prerequisite: previous study of ancient philosophy and permission of the instructor.   HU

* CLCV 450a and CLCV 451b, Two-Term Senior Project for the Major in Classical Civilization Pauline LeVen

Qualified students may write a two-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. An appropriate instructor is assigned to each student by the director of undergraduate studies in consultation with the student. In the first term, selected readings compensate for individual deficiencies and help the student achieve a balanced overview. In the second term, students select a topic for research from any area of the literature, history, culture, or philosophy of ancient Greece, Rome, or Hellenistic Egypt, or a topic from the classical tradition.

* CLCV 452a or b, One-Term Senior Project for the Major in Classical Civilization Pauline LeVen

A one-term senior project. Students select a topic for research from any area of the literature, history, culture, or philosophy of ancient Greece, Rome, or Hellenistic Egypt, or a topic from the classical tradition. An appropriate instructor is assigned to each student by the director of undergraduate studies in consultation with the student.

* CLCV 494a or b, Independent Tutorial in Classical Civilization Pauline LeVen

For students who wish to pursue a specialized subject in classical civilization not otherwise covered in courses. Students are expected to provide a detailed reading list and a clear outline of their project early in the term. The work should result in a term paper or examination. A limited number of these courses may be offered toward the major. Readings in translation. Offered subject to faculty availability.

Graduate Courses of Interest to Undergraduates

Various graduate seminars are open to juniors and seniors with the qualifications expected of graduate students, i.e., proficiency in the pertinent ancient and modern languages. Descriptions of the courses are available from the director of undergraduate studies. Permission is required of the instructor, the director of undergraduate studies, and the director of graduate studies.