Classics

Director of undergraduate studies: Pauline LeVen, 305 Phelps Hall, pauline.leven@yale.edu; classics.yale.edu

The Department of Classics offers a major in Classics, concentrating in either Greek or Latin literature, or in both literatures; a major in Classical Civilization; and, in conjunction with the Hellenic Studies program, a major in Ancient and Modern Greek. The diversity of subject matter covered by these majors makes Classics an excellent partner in interdepartmental major programs. Programs for all majors must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

Placement Procedures

Students are encouraged to take courses as advanced as they can handle with profit and pleasure. The department, recognizing the great variety of preparation in ancient languages, wishes to accommodate incoming students in as flexible a manner as possible. Students who plan either to begin or to continue the study of Greek or Latin should consult members of the departmental faculty as soon as practicable.

Students who have had the equivalent of two years of college-level instruction may try a 400-level course. It is possible to take GREK 141 or LATN 141 after a 400-level course, or to be admitted to a 400-level course after completion of GREK 131 or LATN 131. First-year students are encouraged to take advantage of the initial course selection period before course schedules are due to find the most appropriate course.

Requirements of the Major in Classics

The major in Classics is primarily a liberal arts major. It provides a rigorous interdisciplinary education in the literature, material culture, and history that underlie Western civilization and other humanities disciplines; it can also provide foundational disciplinary expertise for students who wish to do professional graduate work. Students develop a mastery of the classical languages, become acquainted with important periods and major authors in Greek and Roman literature, and develop the linguistic, historical, and theoretical interpretative tools to analyze classical antiquity and its relevance in the modern world. All courses in the department emphasize a combination of precise analysis, original thought, creativity, and breadth of historical inquiry. Courses in other literatures, in history, and in philosophy are strongly recommended for students enrolled in the Classics major.

The candidate for the Classics major may elect either the standard or the intensive major. In both of these majors the department recognizes two kinds of concentration, one aiming at knowledge of both ancient literatures, the other concentrating on either Greek or Latin literature.

The standard major A standard major in two literatures requires no fewer than ten term courses. These include six term courses in Greek and Latin at the level of 390 or above, a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256, which can be substituted with another course in Greek history or culture if CLCV 256 is not offered a particular year), a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257, which can be substituted with another course in Roman history or culture if CLCV 257 is not offered a particular year), and two additional courses in related areas of history and art. The language courses must include GREK 390 or LATN 390 and five term courses at the level of 400 or above. One of the additional courses in a related field must be a term course in ancient history, and the other must be a term course in ancient history, classical art and archaeology, or classical civilization.

Students majoring in one literature (Greek or Latin) are required to take no fewer than ten term courses. These include six term courses in that literature at the level of 390 or above, a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256, which can be substituted with another course in Greek history or culture if CLCV 256 is not offered a particular year), a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257, which can be substituted with another course in Roman history or culture if CLCV 257 is not offered a particular year), a term course in ancient history related to the chosen literature, and an additional term course in ancient history, classical art and archaeology, or classical civilization. The language courses must include GREK 390 or LATN 390 and at least five term courses at the level of 400 or above. Students are encouraged to do some work in the second language and may substitute two terms at the intermediate level (131 and 141) or higher in the second language for two 400-level courses in the major literature. One of the additional courses in a related field must be a term course in ancient history, and the other must be a term course in ancient history, classical art and archaeology, or classical civilization.

The intensive major Students who desire a larger measure of independence than the standard major offers may elect the intensive major. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the standard major (in both literatures, in Greek, or in Latin), students in the intensive major write a senior essay under the regular guidance of a faculty adviser. 

Combined B.A./M.A. degree Exceptionally able and well-prepared students may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. See "Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" under section K, Special Arrangements, in the Academic Regulations. Interested students should consult the director of undergraduate studies prior to the sixth term of enrollment for specific requirements in Classics.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

Senior Requirement 

For the standard major At the end of the senior year the student majoring in both Greek and Latin takes a comprehensive examination in the history of Greek and Latin literature and culture and in translation of both languages; the student majoring in either Greek or Latin takes a senior departmental examination in the history of the literature of the major and in translation of that literature.

For the intensive major Students may write a one-term essay in either the fall or spring (CLSS 492), or they may write a two-term essay (CLSS 490 and 491) starting in the fall of their senior year. A brief prospectus of the essay must be submitted, preferably at the end of the junior year and in no case later than the end of September of the senior year. The candidate must submit two copies of the senior essay to the director of undergraduate studies no later than December 7 (CLSS 492) or April 19 (CLSS 490491 or 492) of the senior year.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 10 term courses

Specific courses required GREK 390 or LATN 390; CLCV 256 and 257

Distribution of coursesTwo literatures—6 courses in both langs at level 390 or above, with at least 5 at 400 level or above; 1 course in ancient hist; 1 addtl course in ancient hist, classical art and archaeology, or classical civ; One literature—6 courses in lit at level 390 or above, with at least 5 at 400 level or above; 1 course in ancient hist related to lit of major; 1 addtl course in ancient hist, classical art and archaeology, or classical civ

Substitution permitted One literature—2 courses in the other lit numbered 131 or higher for 2 courses in major lit at 400 level; All majors—a course in Greek history or culture for CLCV 256 and/or a course in Roman history or culture for CLCV 257, if they are not offered in a particular year

Senior requirementTwo literatures—senior dept exam in hist and translation of Greek and Latin lit; One literature—senior dept exam in hist and translation of major lit

Intensive major Senior essay (CLSS 490, 491 or CLSS 492) in addition to above


Requirements of the Major in Classical Civilization

The major in Classical Civilization is designed to offer students an opportunity to study an entire Western civilization in its many diverse but related aspects. The literature, history, philosophy, religion, art, archaeology, and other aspects of Greek and Roman antiquity from the earliest beginnings in Greece to the Middle Ages are studied for their intrinsic artistic value, their historical significance, and their power to illuminate problems confronting contemporary societies. Each year, the department offers courses that focus on ways that subsequent ages have used and made sense of classical antiquity. Ancient texts are studied primarily in translation, though under the guidance of instructors who have expertise in Greek and Latin.

Candidates for the major complete at least twelve term courses (including the senior essay) in Classics and related departments. Of these, two must be in ancient history and/or classical art and archaeology; and two must be in Greek or Latin, or both, numbered 131 or higher (the latter courses should be completed by the end of the junior year). Students must also take a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256, which can be substituted with another course in Greek history or culture if CLCV 256 is not offered a particular year) and a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257, which can be substituted with another course in Roman history or culture if CLCV 257 is not offered a particular year). It is strongly recommended that candidates elect one course each in the general areas of ancient epic, drama, philosophy, Roman civilization, and the classical tradition. Candidates for the major are encouraged to take related courses in other departments.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

Senior Requirement 

Students research and complete an original research project, usually an essay, under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students choose either a two-term senior project for two course credits (CLCV 450451) or a one-term senior project for one course credit (CLCV 452). Students who elect the one-term senior project need to take one additional course towards the major. A brief prospectus of the project must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies, preferably at the end of the junior year and in no case later than the end of September of the senior year. The completed project must be submitted to the department no later than December 7 (CLCV 452) or April 19 (CLCV 450451 or CLCV 452) of the senior year.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 12 term courses (incl a two-term senior essay, or a one-term senior essay and an additional course)

Specific courses requiredCLCV 256 and 257

Distribution of courses 2 courses in ancient hist and/or classical art and archaeology; 2 courses in Greek or Latin (or both) numbered 131 or higher

Substitution permitted a course in Greek history or culture for CLCV 256, and/or a course in Roman history or culture for CLCV 257, if they are not offered in a particular year

Senior requirement Senior project (CLCV 450, 451 or CLCV 452 and an additional course)


Requirements for the Major in Ancient and Modern Greek

The major in Ancient and Modern Greek offers students an opportunity to integrate the study of postclassical Greek language, history, and culture with the departmental program in ancient Greek and classical civilization. The major covers Hellenic civilization from the Bronze Age to the modern day, and traces the development of the language and the culture across traditionally drawn boundaries. The study of both ancient and modern Greek allows the student to appreciate how familiarity with one enriches understanding of the other, and to chart the development of a language which has one of the oldest continuous written traditions in the world. The literature, history, philosophy, religion, and art of the ancient Greek and Greco-Roman worlds are studied both as ends in themselves and also as a foundation for appreciating later (medieval, Ottoman, and modern) developments in these areas. Students are encouraged to develop a sense of the continuity of Greek language and culture, and an understanding of how Byzantine and modern forms relate to their ancient forebears.

The standard major The major in Ancient and Modern Greek requires at least ten term courses. These include four term courses at the level of 390 or above in ancient Greek, a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Athens (CLCV 256, which can be substituted with another course in Greek history or culture if CLCV 256 is not offered a particular year), a survey of the literature and culture of ancient Rome (CLCV 257, which can be substituted with another course in Roman history or culture if CLCV 257 is not offered a particular year) and one term course in ancient Greek history. The language courses should include GREK 390. Candidates are encouraged to take a wide range of courses in the areas of ancient philosophy, religion, art, and architecture. In addition, no fewer than two term courses in modern Greek must be elected at the intermediate level (MGRK 130, 140) or above, as well as at least one additional term course in the history, art history, literature, or culture of the Greek-speaking Balkans or the Hellenic diaspora in the medieval, Ottoman, or modern period.

The intensive major Students who desire a larger measure of independence than the standard major offers may elect the intensive major. In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the standard major, students in the intensive major write a senior essay under the regular guidance of a faculty adviser. 

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be counted toward the requirements of the major.

Senior Requirement 

The standard major At the end of the senior year the student takes a comprehensive examination in the history of Greek literature and culture.

The intensive major Students may write a one-term essay in the fall or spring (CLSS 492), or they may write a two-term essay starting in the fall of their senior year (CLSS 490 and 491). A brief prospectus of the essay must be submitted, preferably at the end of the junior year and in no case later than the end of September of the senior year. The candidate must submit two copies of the senior essay to the director of undergraduate studies no later than December 7 (CLSS 492) or April 19 (CLSS 490491, or CLSS 492) of the senior year.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 10 term courses

Specific courses required GREK 390; CLCV 256 and 257

Distribution of courses 4 term courses in ancient Greek numbered 390 or higher; 1 term course in ancient Greek hist; 2 term courses in modern Greek numbered 130 or higher; 1 term course in postclassical Greek hist or culture

Substitution permitted a course in Greek history or culture for CLCV 256, and/or a course in Roman history or culture for CLCV 257, if they are not offered in a particular year

Senior requirement Senior dept exam

Intensive major Senior essay (CLSS 490, 491 or CLSS 492) in addition to above

The Classics department offers courses in the languages, literatures, and civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Students may choose to major in Classics, with a focus on Latin, Greek, or Greek and Latin; in Classical Civilization; or in Ancient and Modern Greek.

Students majoring in Classics develop a mastery of classical languages and become acquainted with major authors and genres in Greek and Roman literature, as well as the appropriate cultural and historical contexts for interpreting this literature. During the course of their study, students learn how to interpret Greek and Latin texts from the perspective of audiences and readers in antiquity, and to understand the way in which these texts have circulated in subsequent periods. Courses in other literatures, in history, and in philosophy are strongly recommended for students enrolled in the Classics major.

The Classical Civilization major offers students an opportunity to study the ancient Mediterranean, with a focus on ancient Greece and Rome in its many diverse but related aspects. The major spans the literature, history, philosophy, religion, art, archaeology, and other aspects of Greek and Roman antiquity from early Greek history to the early Middle Ages. Each year the department also offers a number of courses that focus on the dialogue between antiquity and modernity, exploring ways in which Greek and Roman literature, art, and thought might illuminate questions and problems confronting contemporary society. Greek and Roman texts are studied primarily in translation, under the guidance of instructors who know these texts in the original languages.

The major in Ancient and Modern Greek, offered in conjunction with the Hellenic Studies program, allows students to integrate the study of post classical Greek language, history, and culture with the departmental program in ancient Greek and classical civilization. The major covers Hellenic civilization from the Bronze Age to the modern day, and traces the development of the language and the culture across traditionally drawn boundaries. The literature, history, philosophy, religion, and art of the ancient Greek and Greco-Roman worlds are studied both as ends in themselves and also as a foundation for appreciating later (medieval, Ottoman, and modern) developments in these areas.

Students in all three majors are encouraged to pursue interests in related fields, such as linguistics, art history, archaeology, history, or philosophy.

There are no placement examinations in Latin or ancient Greek. Students who want advice about what level of course to take should consult the director of undergraduate studies as soon as practicable in the fall. The DUS will be available at the Academic Fair as noted in the Calendar for the Opening Days.

The introductory courses in ancient Greek and Latin are:

  • GREK 110, Beginning Greek: The Elements of Greek Grammar
  • GREK 120, Beginning Greek: Review of Grammar and Selected Readings
  • GREK 125, Intensive Beginning Greek
  • LATN 110, Beginning Latin: The Elements of Latin Grammar
  • LATN 120, Beginning Latin: Review of Grammar and Selected Readings
  • LATN 125, Intensive Beginning Latin

General survey courses in classical civilization include:

FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS

Professors Egbert Bakker, Kirk Freudenburg, Emily Greenwood, Verity Harte, Brad Inwood, Diana Kleiner, Christina Kraus, Noel Lenski, Joseph Manning

Associate Professors Milette Gaifman, Andrew Johnston, Pauline LeVen, Irene Peirano Garrison

Assistant Professors Andrew Johnston, Jessica Lamont

Lecturers Francoise GerardinAnn Ellis Hanson, Susan Matheson, Timothy Robinson, Barbara Shailor, Joseph Solodow

Courses

Greek

GREK 110a, Beginning Greek: The Elements of Greek GrammarTreasa Bell

Introduction to ancient Greek. Emphasis on morphology and syntax within a structured program of readings and exercises. Prepares for GREK 120. No prior knowledge of Greek assumed.  L1RP1½ Course cr
MTWThF 9:25am-10:15am

GREK 120b, Beginning Greek: Review of Grammar and Selected ReadingsJoseph Morgan

Continuation of GREK 110. Emphasis on consolidating grammar and on readings from Greek authors. The sequence GREK 110, 120 prepares for 131 or 141. Prerequisite: GREK 110 or equivalent.  L2RP1½ Course cr
MTWThF 9:25am-10:15am

* GREK 125b, Intensive Beginning GreekTimothy Robinson

An introduction to classical Greek for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Readings from Greek authors supplement intensive instruction in grammar and vocabulary. The course is intended to be of use to students with diverse academic backgrounds and interests. Prepares for GREK 131. Not open to students who have taken GREK 110, 120.  L1, L2RP2 Course cr
MTWThF 9:25am-11:15am

GREK 131a, Greek Prose: An IntroductionRachel Love

Close reading of selections from classical Greek prose with review of grammar. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 141 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 9:25am-10:15am

GREK 141b, Homer: An IntroductionPauline LeVen

A first approach to reading Homeric poetry in Greek. Selected books of the Iliad or the Odyssey. Counts as L4 if taken after GREK 131 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 10:30am-11:20am

* GREK 450a, EuripidesEgbert Bakker

Close reading of two late plays of Euripides: Helen and Ion. Euripides' literary and dramatic technique; issues of myth, geography, and cultural and personal identity.  L5, HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* GREK 454b, Greek Myth, Fiction, and Science FictionPauline LeVen

Relationships between ancient Greek myths, fiction, and speculative/science fiction, with attention to interpretive approaches and methodologies. Narrative modes of representing reality; distinguishing fiction from myth and science fiction; cultural uses of myth and fiction. Readings include works by Homer, Longus, Lucian, and Philostratus.  L5
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* GREK 459a, Gender & Citizenship in Athenian LawEmily Greenwood

This course examines the intersection of gender and citizenship in Athenian forensic (lawcourt) oratory from the 4th century BCE. We read and analyze selected speeches by Lysias, Demosthenes, Aeschines, and Apollodorus with particular attention to the ways in which these speeches represent and negotiate norms of gender and an inquiry into the interrelationship of sex, gender, and citizenship in Athenian law. The course focuses on the translation and interpretation of Athenian lawcourt speeches, informed by scholarship on Athenian law, scholarship on gender and sexuality in ancient Greece, and pertinent works of gender theory. This is a bridge course, intended to build competence and confidence in reading Greek and interpreting Greek literature. Prerequisite: Completion of an L4 Greek course or its equivalent.   L5, HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* GREK 463b, Praxis and Theory of the Greek SymposiumEgbert Bakker

Reading and interpretation of a selection of texts (poetry and prose) pertaining to the Ancient Greek symposium as a central cultural institution. This is an L5 course (GREK 400/700) in the Classics programs (400 for undergraduate enrollment, 700 for graduate enrollment). Prerequisite is the 2-year (4-semesters) initiatory cycle (GREK 130-140).  L5
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* GREK 494a or b, Independent Tutorial in Greek Language and LiteraturePauline LeVen

For students with advanced Greek language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered in courses. The work should result in a term paper or examination. A limited number of these courses may be offered toward the major. Offered subject to faculty availability.
HTBA

Latin

LATN 110a, Beginning Latin: The Elements of Latin GrammarStaff

Introduction to Latin. Emphasis on morphology and syntax within a structured program of readings and exercises. Prepares for LATN 120. No prior knowledge of Latin assumed. Preregistration, which is required, takes place at the Academic Fair. See the Calendar for the Opening Days or the departmental Web site for details about preregistration.  L1RP1½ Course cr
HTBA

LATN 120b, Beginning Latin: Review of Grammar and Selected ReadingsStaff

Continuation of LATN 110. Emphasis on consolidating grammar and on readings from Latin authors. The sequence LATN 110, 120 prepares for 131 or 141. Prerequisite: LATN 110 or equivalent.  L2RP1½ Course cr
HTBA

LATN 131a, Latin Prose: An IntroductionJennifer Weintritt

Close reading of a major work of classical prose; review of grammar as needed. Counts as L4 if taken after LATN 141 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 1:30pm-2:20pm

LATN 141b, Latin Poetry: An IntroductionNoreen Sit

The course is devoted to Vergil. Counts as L4 if taken after LATN 131 or equivalent.  L3
MWF 2:30pm-3:20pm

* LATN 390b, Latin Syntax and StylisticsJoseph Solodow

A systematic review of syntax and an introduction to Latin style. Selections from Latin prose authors are read and analyzed, and students compose short pieces of Latin prose. For students with some experience reading Latin literature who desire a better foundation in forms, syntax, idiom, and style.  L5, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* LATN 421a, Vergil's AeneidKirk Freudenburg

An in-depth study of Vergil's Aeneid within its political context.  L5
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

LATN 414b, Roman Civil WarsIrene Peirano

Ways in which Romans constructed and represented their civil wars in literature across a variety of genres (epic, lyric, historiography), authors (Vergil, Lucan, Caesar, Sallust) and time periods (late republic, empire).  L5, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

LATN 440a, Roman FriendshipJoseph Solodow

Readings from works by Catullus (selected poems), Cicero (De Amicitia), Horace (Epistles I), Seneca the Younger and Pliny the Younger (selected letters). The concept of friendship and its importance in Roman society; comparison with other societies. A bridge course between L4 and other L5 courses.  L5, HU
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* LATN 462a, The Histories of TacitusChristina Kraus

Close reading of the Histories of Tacitus and related selections from his other works. Attention to syntax and style. Focus on the influence of the author's background and experience on his narrative.  L5, HU
TTh 9am-10:15am

* LATN 494a or b, Independent Tutorial in Latin Language and LiteraturePauline LeVen

For students with advanced Latin language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered in courses. The work should result in a term paper or examination. A limited number of these courses may be offered toward the major. Offered subject to faculty availability.
HTBA

Classics

* CLSS 402b, Advanced Latin PaleographyBarbara Shailor

The challenges of using hand-produced Latin manuscripts in research, with an emphasis on texts from the late Middle Ages. Gothic cursive scripts and bookhands c. 1200–c. 1500; fragments of unidentified codices; complex or composite codices with heavy interlinear and marginal annotations. Manuscripts and fragments selected largely from collections in the Beinecke Library. Prerequisite: CLSS 401 or permission of instructor.  L5, HU
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* CLSS 405a, Greek PapyrologyAnn Hanson

Literary and documentary papyri of Greek and Roman Egypt, concentrating on documents housed in the Beinecke Library from the late Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Topics include using papyri as sources for social and other histories; gaining familiarity with the language of the papyri; and the reading of literary and documentary hands. Prerequisites: proficiency in Greek; reading knowledge of German and French.  L5, HU
T 2:30pm-4:30pm

* CLSS 490a and CLSS 491b, Two-Term Senior Essay for the Intensive Major in ClassicsPauline LeVen

Qualified students may write a two-term senior essay in ancient literature or classical archaeology under the guidance of a faculty adviser. A written statement of purpose must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.
HTBA

CLSS 492a or b, One-Term Senior Essay for the Intensive Major in ClassicsPauline LeVen

Qualified students may write a one-term senior essay in ancient literature or classical archaeology under the guidance of a faculty adviser. A written statement of purpose must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies.
HTBA

Classical Civilization

* CLCV 052a, The Myths of OedipusChristina Kraus

Study of different versions of the Oedipus myth, beginning with Sophocles' three plays (Oedipus the King, Antigone, and Oedipus at Colonus) and including modern adaptations such as those by Cocteau (The Infernal Machine), Fugard (The Island), and Dove (The Darker Face of the Earth); we also consider filmed adaptations such as Martha Grahame's "Night Journey" (1947), The Gospel at Colonus (1984), and Oedipo alcalde (1996). Secondary material, including works by cultural, psychological, and literary critics, provide background for the literary works. Readings, writing exercises, and discussion aim both to elucidate the original context of the plays in fifth-century Athens and to understand their contested and still vigorous place in the canon and in the western humanities.  All readings in English. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.   HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* CLCV 119b / LITR 165b, The Invention of the ClassicIrene Peirano

The discourse of classicism from antiquity to modern times. Contemporary debates over the value of the classics in education; the emergence of classics as a discipline; changing definitions of the classic across time; notions commonly associated with the classics such as timelessness, beauty, and canon. Readings from Cicero, Horace, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Winckelmann, Eliot, Gadamer, Foucault, Kermode, Calvino, and Nussbaum.HU
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLCV 125a / PHIL 125a, Introduction to Ancient PhilosophyVerity Harte

An introduction to ancient philosophy, beginning with the earliest pre-Socratics, concentrating on Plato and Aristotle, and including a brief foray into Hellenistic philosophy. Intended to be taken in conjunction with PHIL 126.  WR, HU
TTh 11:35am-12:25pm

CLCV 129a / HIST 159a / HUMS 129a / NELC 326a / RLST 158a, From Jesus to MuhammadStephen Davis

The history of Christianity and the development of Western culture from Jesus to the early Middle Ages. The creation of orthodoxy and heresy; Christian religious practice; philosophy and theology; politics and society; gender; Christian literature in its various forms, up to and including the early Islamic period.  HU
TTh 11:35am-12:25pm

CLCV 161a / ARCG 161a / HSAR 247a, Art and Myth in Greek AntiquityMilette Gaifman

Visual exploration of Greek mythology through the study of ancient Greek art and architecture. Greek gods, heroes, and mythological scenes foundational to Western culture; the complex nature of Greek mythology; how art and architecture rendered myths ever present in ancient Greek daily experience; ways in which visual representations can articulate stories. Use of collections in the Yale University Art Gallery.  HU
TTh 10:30am-11:20am

CLCV 175a / ARCG 252a / HSAR 252a, Roman ArchitectureDiana Kleiner

The great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Study of city planning and individual monuments and their decoration, including mural painting. Emphasis on developments in Rome, Pompeii, and central Italy; survey of architecture in the provinces.  HU
TTh 9am-10:15am

CLCV 204b / HIST 300b, Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic WorldJoseph Manning

The history and culture of the ancient world between the rise of Macedonian imperialism in the fourth century B.C.E. and the annexation of Egypt by Augustus in 30 B.C.E. Particular attention to Alexander, one of the most important figures in world history, and to the definition of "Hellenism."  WR, HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:20pm

CLCV 205a / HIST 205a / HUMS 143a, Introduction to Ancient Greek HistoryFrançois Gerardin

Introduction to Greek history, tracing the development of Greek civilization as manifested in the political, military, intellectual, and creative achievements from the Bronze Age through the end of the Classical period. Students read original sources in translation as well as secondary scholarship to better understand the rise and fall of the ancient Greeks—the civilization at the very heart of Western Civilization.   HU
MW 10:30am-11:20am

CLCV 206a / HIST 217a / HUMS 144a, The Roman RepublicFrançois Gerardin

The origins, development, and expansion of Rome from the earliest times to the deaths of Caesar and Cicero. Cultural identity and interaction; slavery, class, and the family; politics, rhetoric, and propaganda; religion; imperialism; monumentality and memory; and the perception and writing of history. Application of literary and archaeological evidence.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

CLCV 207b / HIST 218b, The Roman EmpireFrançois Gerardin

The history of the Roman Empire from its establishment by Augustus to the reign of Justinian. Attention to social, intellectual, and religious changes, as well as to the framework of historical events within which these changes took place, and to the processes by which the Roman Empire was replaced by the institutions of the Western Middle Ages and the Byzantine Empire.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* CLCV 209a / LITR 230a / MGRK 215a, Nikos Kazantzakis: From Revolution to NihilismGeorge Syrimis

The Greek poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, playwright, and travel writer Nikos Kazantzakis. The philosophical influence of Darwin, Nietzsche, and Bergson on Kazantzakis; his fascination with the figures of Christ and Odysseus. Questions of fiction and autobiography, history and revolution, travel writing, twentieth-century existentialism, and the reception of the Homeric tradition.  WR, HUTr
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

* CLCV 216a / LITR 239a / MGRK 216a / WGSS 209a, Dionysus in ModernityGeorge Syrimis

Modernity's fascination with the myth of Dionysus. Questions of agency, identity and community, and psychological integrity and the modern constitution of the self. Manifestations of Dionysus in literature, anthropology, and music; the Apollonian-Dionysiac dichotomy; twentieth-century variations of these themes in psychoanalysis, surrealism, and magical realism.  HUTr
F 1:30pm-3:20pm

* CLCV 288a / EP&E 322a / PHIL 288a / PLSC 288a, Advanced Topics in Ancient Political Thought: Plato, Aristotle, CiceroDaniela Cammack

An opportunity to read, or to re-read, the most significant political statements of three foundational figures in Western political thought, paying attention to both historical context and philosophical argument. Particular focus on the relationships between a) the just (to dikaion) and the advantageous (to sympheron) and b) the honourable (honesta) and the useful (utilis). Some experience of political theory or intellectual history is expected.  HU, SO
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

CLCV 311a / HIST 311a, Egypt of the PharaohsJoseph Manning

Egypt was among the first centralized territorial states in the world, and, because Egyptian history offers us 4000 years of institutional development and change, the focus of this course is on the long-term development of the ancient Egyptian state, its institutions, and its culture. The course introduces students to the history and culture of ancient Egypt from the rise of the central state to the early Christian period. General historical trends, the relationship of Egyptian history to other contemporary ancient cultures, and the legacy of Egypt to the “West” are also considered. At the end of the course, students have an understanding of the material culture and the historical development of ancient Egypt, and an appreciation for the relationship of the ancient sources to the construction of ancient Egyptian history.  HU
MW 10:30am-11:20am

* CLCV 319b / HIST 242Jb / MGRK 300b / WGSS 293b, The Olympic Games, Ancient and ModernGeorge Syrimis

Introduction to the history of the Olympic Games from antiquity to the present. The mythology of athletic events in ancient Greece and the ritual, political, and social ramifications of the actual competitions. The revival of the modern Olympic movement in 1896, the political investment of the Greek state at the time, and specific games as they illustrate the convergence of athletic cultures and sociopolitical transformations in the twentieth century.  HU
Th 9:25am-11:15am

* CLCV 389a / ARCG 311a / ARCG 611a / CLSS 811a / NELC 389a / NELC 611a / RLST 355a / RLST 833a, The Ancient Egyptian Temple as Cosmos: Correlation of Architecture and Decoration ProgramChristina Geisen

The course focuses on the correlation of archaeology, iconography, and philology by analyzing ancient Egyptian temples under the specific consideration of the interplay of architecture and decoration program. The different types of temples and their developments over time are discussed. The main focus is the function of each temple type, which can only be understood by analyzing the architecture of the monument, its decoration program, related texts (such as rituals, myths, and festival description, but also historical texts), and its place in the cultic landscape of the specific location. The class also provides an overview of rituals performed and festivals celebrated in the temples, as well as of the administrative sphere of the temple. Optional field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to see the Temple of Dendur. No previous knowledge of ancient Egyptian culture or languages is necessary; all texts are read in translation.   HU
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLCV 419a / NELC 119a / NELC 419, Ancient EmpiresKevin Van Bladel

This is an introduction to the history and cultures of the ancient empires of southwestern Asia, focusing on the period from the Assyrian and Persian Empires to the establishment of Islam (ca 900 BCE–ca 750 CE). Students learn how to use ancient primary sources critically to create a historical narrative and to understand the modern appropriation of ancient history for political and other purposes. Primary sources include classical Greek and Latin authors, as well as works composed in Iran, from royal inscriptions to neighboring Armenian and Aramaic sources chronicling war and strife. Major topics include the formation of early states, the kingdoms of Mesopotamia, Anshan and the Elamites, the Achaemenid dynasty, Alexander and his successors, the Parthian and Sasanian Persian empires and their rivalries with Rome, as well as the empires of Afghanistan and the kingdom of Armenia. Additionally, the course includes an introduction to the geography of southwestern Asia and a survey of languages, Iranian and other religions, and some ancient literature from a variety of cultures. Events covered in this course contributed decisively to the demography of the present-day Near East and the social characteristics of its people, from the distribution of language communities to the variety of Near Eastern religions. Students gain some understanding of the makeup of the modern Near East, including how the population of the region became predominantly Muslim.  HU
MW 9am-10:15am

* CLCV 443a / GMAN 443a / HUMS 356 / LITR 455 / PHIL 478a, Antigone after Hegel: The Ambiguities of Ethical Life and ActionDirk Setton

Study of the three interpretations of Sophocles’ Antigone with divergent accounts of the central conflict of the tragedy, the heroine’s act of burying her brother Polyneices against the edict of the ruler of Thebes. In the Phenomenology of Spirit, Hegel conceives of Antigone as embodying the natural law of the family that opposes the instituted law of the polis. According to Hegel, both laws represent legitimate ethical claims with their confrontation marking the demise of (ancient) ethical life. Jacques Lacan, in his Seminar on the Ethics of Psychoanalysis, and Judith Butler, in Antigone’s Claim, both develop their readings of Sophocles’ tragedy in a critical debate with Hegel: While Lacan holds Antigone to reveal the essential connection between desire and death rather than to represent unwritten laws, Butler insists that Antigone should be understood as the figure of a critical destitution of the normativity of kinship. By discussing these three approaches the reading of Sophocles’ tragedy focuses on the following questions: What does Antigone stand for? How should we conceive of the central conflict of the tragedy? And how should we conceptualize the ethical character of Antigone’s act to bury her brother? Emphasis on the tragic irony of ethical life; the deep ambiguity of individual autonomy; and the paradoxes of the normativity of kinship relations and the gender identities that lie within it.  HU
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* CLCV 450a and CLCV 451b, Two-Term Senior Project for the Major in Classical CivilizationPauline LeVen

Qualified students may write a two-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. An appropriate instructor is assigned to each student by the director of undergraduate studies in consultation with the student. In the first term, selected readings compensate for individual deficiencies and help the student achieve a balanced overview. In the second term, students select a topic for research from any area of the literature, history, culture, or philosophy of ancient Greece, Rome, or Hellenistic Egypt, or a topic from the classical tradition.
HTBA

* CLCV 452a or b, One-Term Senior Project for the Major in Classical CivilizationPauline LeVen

A one-term senior project. Students select a topic for research from any area of the literature, history, culture, or philosophy of ancient Greece, Rome, or Hellenistic Egypt, or a topic from the classical tradition. An appropriate instructor is assigned to each student by the director of undergraduate studies in consultation with the student.
HTBA

* CLCV 494a or b, Independent Tutorial in Classical CivilizationStaff

For students who wish to pursue a specialized subject in classical civilization not otherwise covered in courses. Students are expected to provide a detailed reading list and a clear outline of their project early in the term. The work should result in a term paper or examination. A limited number of these courses may be offered toward the major. Readings in translation. Offered subject to faculty availability.
HTBA

Graduate Courses of Interest to Undergraduates

Various graduate seminars are open to juniors and seniors with the qualifications expected of graduate students, i.e., proficiency in the pertinent ancient and modern languages. Descriptions of the courses are available from the director of undergraduate studies. Permission is required of the instructor, the director of undergraduate studies, and the director of graduate studies.