Courses without Area Designations

Courses listed below do not normally count toward fulfillment of the area distribution requirements described in the chapter Programs of Study.

REL 3603a, Elementary Biblical Hebrew IEric Reymond

An introduction to the language of the Hebrew Scriptures—Biblical Hebrew. Students work through the grammar book, doing exercises and practicing paradigms. Among these exercises is the reading of specific biblical texts. By the end of the year, students should have a basic grasp of this ancient language’s grammar and some experience reading Hebrew.  3 Course cr
MWF 8:30am-9:20am

REL 3604b, Elementary Biblical Hebrew IIEric Reymond

A continuation of REL 3603. An introduction to the language of the Hebrew Scriptures—Biblical Hebrew. Students work through the grammar book, doing exercises and practicing paradigms. Among these exercises is the reading of specific biblical texts. By the end of the year, students should have a basic grasp of this ancient language’s grammar and some experience reading Hebrew.  3 Course cr
MWF 8:30am-9:20am

REL 3605a, Elementary New Testament Greek IDaniel Bohac

First term of a two-term introduction to the ancient Greek language of the New Testament for those with little or no knowledge of ancient Greek. This first term concentrates on elementary grammar and syntax and on building vocabulary.  3 Course cr
MWF 8:30am-9:20am

REL 3606b, Elementary New Testament Greek IIDaniel Bohac

Second term of a two-term introduction to the ancient Greek language of the New Testament for those with little or no knowledge of ancient Greek. The second term focuses on improving reading and translation skills and on developing working knowledge of the critical scholarly tools used in New Testament interpretation. Prerequisite: REL 3605 or equivalent.  3 Course cr
MWF 8:30am-9:20am

REL 3610b, Medieval Latin: The Calamitous Life of Peter AbelardJohn Dillon

This is an introductory reading course in Medieval Latin that is intended to help students improve their reading ability by working directly with a medieval text. We read Peter Abelard’s Historia calamitatum, “A History of My Calamities,” in which the foremost scholar and theologian of the twelfth century gives a candid account of his life. Abelard was a celebrity professor at the dawn of the university, only to spectacularly fall into disgrace for the secret love affair with Heloise that resulted in his castration at the hands of his father-in-law. As we read Abelard’s fascinating account of his life, we focus on reinforcing our knowledge of Latin grammar and syntax and pay special attention to the features of Abelard’s language that are typical of Medieval Latin. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of Latin grammar and syntax, equivalent to LATN 110 and LATN 120, offered by the Classics department.  3 Course cr
TTh 10am-11:20am

REL 3615b, Crisis Management in Churches and NonprofitsJames Elrod

Increasingly, churches and other nonprofit organizations find themselves in a state of financial crisis. How can the leaders of these institutions recognize that they are entering into financial crisis? What can they do to stabilize their situation? What turnaround strategies will most likely lead to long-term recovery? This course utilizes a case-study approach to examine both the causes and cures for nonprofits in financial crisis. Prerequisite: successful completion of REL 813 or permission of the instructor.  1½ Course cr
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

REL 3699a or b, Reading CourseStaff

Reading courses may be arranged on materials, subjects, and concerns not included in the courses being offered, or may have a narrower focus than those courses. Reading courses may count toward distributional requirements across areas of the curriculum but may not be counted as fulfilling particular requirements within an area. Only full-time faculty at Yale University may offer reading courses.  3 Course cr
HTBA

REL 3792a, Colloquium on Ministry Formation/AnglicanCathy George

The overall purpose of the Colloquium series in the Anglican Studies curriculum is to supplement the curriculum with topics of importance in preparing for service to God in and through the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion. The Colloquium offers Episcopal and Anglican students an opportunity to engage in reflection and discernment on their experience of formation for religious leadership, lay and ordained, providing an opportunity to integrate varied theological disciplines. While leadership skills and capabilities can in some measure be taught abstractly, they are most effectively integrated into one’s formation through exposure to seasoned leaders in various institutional contexts. Students explore a wide variety of leadership skills and styles in the presentations at the Colloquium and the assigned readings. Students practice leadership skills through role-playing, improvisation, and case studies. The intention is to set a leadership context in which students can practice leadership lessons that can be adapted to a ministry environment. Each term of the Colloquium focuses on different leadership skills. Over the course of their participation in Colloquium, Berkeley students are exposed to, and given an opportunity to practice, valuable leadership skills for ministry. These one-half-credit colloquia are required of all Berkeley Divinity School students wishing to qualify for the Diploma in Anglican Studies.  ½ Course cr
M 4pm-5:20pm

REL 3793a, Colloquium on Ministry Formation/AnglicanAndrew McGowan

The overall purpose of the Colloquium series in the Anglican Studies curriculum is to supplement the curriculum with topics of importance in preparing for service to God in and through the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion. The Colloquium offers Episcopal and Anglican students an opportunity to engage in reflection and discernment on their experience of formation for religious leadership, lay and ordained, providing an opportunity to integrate varied theological disciplines. While leadership skills and capabilities can in some measure be taught abstractly, they are most effectively integrated into one’s formation through exposure to seasoned leaders in various institutional contexts. Students explore a wide variety of leadership skills and styles in the presentations at the Colloquium and the assigned readings. Students practice leadership skills through role-playing, improvisation, and case studies. The intention is to set a leadership context in which students can practice leadership lessons that can be adapted to a ministry environment. Each term of the Colloquium focuses on different leadership skills. Over the course of their participation in Colloquium, Berkeley students are exposed to, and given an opportunity to practice, valuable leadership skills for ministry. These one-half-credit colloquia are required of all Berkeley Divinity School students wishing to qualify for the Diploma in Anglican Studies.  ½ Course cr
M 4pm-5:20pm

REL 3794b, Colloquium on Ministry Formation/AnglicanAndrew McGowan and Cathy George

The overall purpose of the Colloquium series in the Anglican Studies curriculum is to supplement the curriculum with topics of importance in preparing for service to God in and through the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion. The Colloquium offers Episcopal and Anglican students an opportunity to engage in reflection and discernment on their experience of formation for religious leadership, lay and ordained, providing an opportunity to integrate varied theological disciplines. While leadership skills and capabilities can in some measure be taught abstractly, they are most effectively integrated into one’s formation through exposure to seasoned leaders in various institutional contexts. Students explore a wide variety of leadership skills and styles in the presentations at the Colloquium and the assigned readings. Students practice leadership skills through role-playing, improvisation, and case studies. The intention is to set a leadership context in which students can practice leadership lessons that can be adapted to a ministry environment. Each term of the Colloquium focuses on different leadership skills. Over the course of their participation in Colloquium, Berkeley students are exposed to, and given an opportunity to practice, valuable leadership skills for ministry. These one-half-credit colloquia are required of all Berkeley Divinity School students wishing to qualify for the Diploma in Anglican Studies.  ½ Course cr
M 4pm-5:20pm

REL 3795a or b, Colloquium on Ministry Formation/LutheranStaff

The one-half-credit Lutheran Colloquium is offered each fall and spring term. The fall colloquium focuses on Lutheran worship; the spring colloquium focuses on Lutheran spiritual practices and self-care. The primary focus is on students considering ordination in the ELCA, but it is open to all.  ½ Course cr
HTBA

REL 3797a / REL 3798b, Andover Newton Colloquium I and II: Ministry in the MakingMark Heim and Sarah Drummond

This one-hour weekly colloquium for ministerial formation, running over both fall (REL 3797) and spring (REL 3798) terms, deals with mentoring, theological reflection, and free church ecclesiology. Required of all M.Div. students enrolled in the Andover Newton program at Yale. One-half credit per term.  ½ Course cr
Th 5:30pm-6:20pm

REL 3798b / REL 3797a, Andover Newton Colloquium I and II: Ministry in the MakingMark Heim and Sarah Drummond

This one-hour weekly colloquium for ministerial formation, running over both fall (REL 3797) and spring (REL 3798) terms, deals with mentoring, theological reflection, and free church ecclesiology. Required of all M.Div. students enrolled in the Andover Newton program at Yale. One-half credit per term.  ½ Course cr
Th 5:30pm-6:20pm

REL 3799a or b, M.Div. ThesisStaff

A thesis or project is an option in the third year of the M.Div. program. Theses or projects written for the M.Div. program are eligible for elective credit only.  3 Course cr
HTBA

REL 3899a or b, M.A.R. Thesis or ProjectStaff

A project or thesis is an option for both the concentrated and comprehensive M.A.R. programs. Students may elect to write a thesis in the second year of their program. Candidates who choose to write theses or pursue projects enroll for one or two terms, three credit hours per term.  For M.A.R. concentrated program students, the academic adviser determines area credit. Theses or projects written for the M.A.R. comprehensive program are eligible for elective credit only.  3 Course cr
HTBA

REL 3900a or b, Transformational Leadership for Church and SocietyWilliam Goettler

This series of one-credit-hour courses, three in the fall term and three in the spring term, helps students discover new ways to offer responsible, creative, and inspirational leadership in church and society, with guest instructors who are proven leaders in a range of arenas. Each course weekend includes four hours of instruction on Friday afternoon/evening, including two and a half hours of instruction and a ninety-minute public event with each invited guest. The class gathers for eight hours on Saturday. A maximum of two credits may be taken within a term, and a maximum of three credits may be applied to the M.A.R., M.Div., or S.T.M. degree through enrollment in this course.
HTBA

REL 3901a, Andover Newton Colloquium III: Reading the Bible in CommunityGregory Mobley

The Andover Newton Colloquium series supplements the curriculum with topics of importance in the preparation of women and men for service to God in and through the Free Church traditions, such as the ecclesiastical families in the “congregationalist” wing of Christendom, e.g., the United Church of Christ, the various expressions of the Baptist communion, and Unitarian Universalists. This one-half-credit colloquium on Reading the Bible in Community offers students an opportunity to engage in preparation, leadership, and reflection on the study of Scripture in group contexts from a confessional perspective. It supports the weekly Bible study offered at the Emmaus worship service sponsored by Andover Newton Seminary at YDS.  ½ Course cr
Th 6:30pm-8:30pm

REL 3902b, Andover Newton Colloquium IV: The Road to Emmaus: Building Community through WorshipSarah Drummond

In this one-half-credit colloquium, students engage in an action-reflection model for planning and carrying out Andover Newton Seminary’s weekly worship service, Emmaus. Students read and reflect together on the topic of community building and consider how worship can foster collective and individual spiritual growth. Permission of the instructor required.  ½ Course cr
HTBA

REL 3910a or b, ISM ColloquiumMartin Jean

The Institute of Sacred Music Colloquium is central to the purpose of the Institute and to the faculty’s involvement in, and personal attention to, how ISM students are trained. Colloquium is the meeting ground for all Institute students and faculty, the place where we study together, grapple with major issues, and share our work as students of sacred music, worship, and the arts. Taken for .5 credits per term, Colloquium meets every Wednesday from 3:30 until 5 p.m., with informal discussion from 5 to 5:30 p.m. ISM students from the two partner schools of Music and Divinity collaborate on a presentation to be given in their final year. The course is divided into two term-long parts, with responsibility for the fall term resting primarily with the faculty and outside presenters, and for the spring term primarily with the students.  ½ Course cr
HTBA

REL 3986a, Part-time Internship with PracticumJennifer Davis

This internship is taken for two consecutive terms starting in September. Internship sites include churches, social service and social change agencies, schools, college campuses, and other institutions. The internship, under the mentorship of a trained supervisor, is combined with a peer reflection group (Practicum) taught by a practitioner, for a total of four hundred hours over the two terms. The internship is guided by a learning covenant that is developed by the student in collaboration with the supervisor. In some cases where a site does not have a theologically trained supervisor, the student may also receive supervision from a theological mentor assigned by the director of the OSM. The Part-time Internship with Practicum carries three credits each term. Both terms must be completed to meet the degree requirement. Placements are selected during the preceding spring term.  3 Course cr
Th 4pm-5:20pm

REL 3987b, Part-time Internship with PracticumJennifer Davis

This internship is taken for two consecutive terms starting in September. Internship sites include churches, social service and social change agencies, schools, college campuses, and other institutions. The internship, under the mentorship of a trained supervisor, is combined with a peer reflection group (Practicum) taught by a practitioner, for a total of four hundred hours over the two terms. The internship is guided by a learning covenant that is developed by the student in collaboration with the supervisor. In some cases where a site does not have a theologically trained supervisor, the student may also receive supervision from a theological mentor assigned by the director of the OSM. The Part-time Internship with Practicum carries three credits each term. Both terms must be completed to meet the degree requirement. Placements are selected during the preceding spring term.  3 Course cr
Th 4pm-5:20pm

REL 3990a or b, Negotiating Boundaries in Ministerial RelationshipsJennifer Davis and Kathryn Ott

This nine-hour workshop helps students develop critically reflective understandings of professional ethics as it applies to maintaining boundaries in the practice of Christian ministry. This subject is explored through the analysis of aspects of spiritual care and ministerial behavior, including sexuality, power, boundaries, and the personhood or character of the minister. The workshop, required of all M.Div. students, is a prerequisite for any supervised ministry. The workshop does not receive academic credit but does appear on the student’s transcript.  0 Course cr
HTBA

REL 3999a or b, S.T.M. Thesis or ProjectStaff

An extended paper, an independent thesis, or a project in the candidate’s area of concentration is required for the S.T.M. degree. Extended papers are written in conjunction with the regular requirements for courses credited toward the S.T.M. degree. Candidates who choose to write theses or pursue projects enroll for one or two terms, three credit hours per term.  3 Course cr
HTBA