Architecture

Director of undergraduate studies: Michael Schlabs, RDH, 180 York St.; architecture.yale.edu

Architecture is a humanistic endeavor. The purpose of the undergraduate major is to include the study of architecture within a comprehensive liberal arts education, drawing from the broader academic and professional environment of the Yale School of Architecture. The curriculum includes work in design; in history, theory, and criticism of architecture; and in urbanism, and leads to a bachelor of arts degree with a major in Architecture. As a liberal arts major in Yale College, it is not an accredited professional degree program. For accredited professional degree programs, refer to the requirements of the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).

Introductory Courses for Nonmajors and Majors

Introductory courses are ARCH 150, 200, and 280. They are open to all Yale College students and are required for those interested in the Architecture major prior to submitting a Declaration of Intent to Major. Interested students may also consider courses such as ARCH 154, 160, 260, 312, or 345.

Prerequisites

Three courses are prerequisite for all concentrations: ARCH 150, 200, and 280.

Requirements of the Major   

Students majoring in Architecture are required to take fifteen course credits, including prerequisites and the senior requirement. Majors are expected to take the three prerequisites by the end of their sophomore year and to complete a core of four courses, for five course credits, by the end of their junior year. They must also base their studies in one of two areas of concentration: the Design concentration or the History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism concentration. Majors are also required to complete three orientation sessions: advanced technology orientation, library orientation, and shop orientation. Within the concentrations, electives are categorized under four broad subject areas: history and theory of architecture and the city; urbanism and landscape; materials and design; and structures and computation.

Students in the Class of 2023 and the Class of 2024 may continue to concentrate in the Urbanism concentration.

Design concentration The Design concentration explores the role of architecture in shaping the world around us. It introduces complex processes involved in solving spatial and programmatic problems. Creative work is grounded in the study of history and culture, and in the analysis of social conditions influencing architecture. Design studios provide a forum for production and discourse. Studio projects address issues of architectural form, space, composition, site, tectonics, and programs within broader humanistic ideals. 

For the Design concentration, the following additional courses are required:

  1. A core of four courses: the studio courses ARCH 250 and 251 taken during the junior year after the student is accepted into the major; and the history of architecture surveys, ARCH 260 and 312, to be completed by the end of the junior year
  2. One elective in history and theory of architecture as outlined in the elective options below 
  3. One elective in urbanism and landscape as outlined in the elective options below 
  4. One elective in materials and design as outlined in the elective options below
  5. One elective in structures and computation as outlined in the elective options below 
  6. The senior requirement, ARCH 450 and 494

History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism concentration The History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism concentration is intended to establish a broad historical and intellectual framework for the study of architecture and the city. An interdisciplinary approach is encouraged through additional courses taken in various fields of humanities and social sciences. Such courses may include archaeology, urban studies, aesthetics, philosophy, or visual culture. Permission of the director of undergraduate studies (DUS) is required if the courses fall outside the specified course of studies. During their senior year students complete a senior essay or project on a topic approved by the faculty.

For the History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism concentration, the following additional courses are required:

  1. A core of four courses: the urban laboratory, ARCH 250 or 360 taken during the fall term of junior year; ARCH 362 or an elective taken during the spring term of junior year; and the history of architecture surveys ARCH 260 and 312 to be completed by the end of junior year
  2. Four electives in history and theory of architecture and the city as outlined in the elective options below 
  3. One elective in urbanism and landscape, materials and design, or structures and computation or other relevant course approved by the DUS as outlined in the elective options below
  4. The senior requirement, ARCH 490 and 491

Elective Options in subject areas

History and theory of architecture and the city Electives can be chosen from ARCH 006, 271, 272, 314, 316, 327, 332, or other relevant courses in History of Art and other, related fields approved by the DUS. Examples of approved courses include: HSAR 143, 160, 221, 260, and 432

Urbanism and landscape Electives can be chosen from ARCH 006, 160, 314, 316, 324, 327, 341, 345 or other relevant courses in American Studies; Ethics, Politics, and Economics; Environmental Studies; or Political Science approved by the DUS. Examples include: AFAM 297358, 450; AFST 235, 345; AMST 258348ANTH 414ENAS 425ER&M 293; EVST 196, 227, 255, 292, EVST 403; SOCY 341 and 584.

Materials and design Electives can be chosen from ARCH 154, 162, 325, 332 or another relevant course approved by the DUS. Examples include: ART 110, 123, 130, and 210 

Structures and computation Electives can be chosen from ARCH 161, an approved calculus course such as MATH 112115120, or physics course such as PHYS 180201, PHYS 280, or other relevant course approved by the DUS. One example of an approved course is MENG 280. (Elementary calculus is strongly recommended as preparation for graduate studies in architecture.)

Required Orientations

Advanced Technology orientation All Architecture students are required to complete orientation sessions in advanced technology workshop and materials laboratory. Students enrolled in ARCH 200 are required to complete these sessions at the beginning of the spring term of the sophomore year. Access to digital media equipment is not allowed until the required orientation sessions have been completed. Questions should be addressed to the DUS or the director of advanced technology, Vincent Guerrero, 432-7552.

Library orientation The Architecture program requires all students to complete a ninety-minute introductory library research session. Students enrolled in ARCH 200 must take this session at the beginning of the spring term of the sophomore year. Failure to complete the required orientation precludes completion of the major. Students may not offer substitutions for this orientation. Students should register with the Haas Family Arts Library Public Services Librarian, Lindsay King, 436-8052. Questions should be addressed to the DUS.

Shop orientation The Architecture program requires all majors to complete several woodshop and materials lab orientation sessions. Students who plan to enroll in ARCH 250 must take these sessions at the beginning of fall term in the junior year, before the first day of classes. Access to the woodshop and materials lab is not allowed until the required orientation sessions have been completed. Questions should be addressed to the DUS or to the shop coordinator, Timothy Newton, 432-7234.

Credit/D/Fail No course taken Credit/D/Fail may be counted toward the Architecture major.

Senior Requirement 

Seniors in the Design concentration take ARCH 450 in the fall term and 494 in the spring term. Seniors in the History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism concentration take ARCH 490 in the fall term and 491 in the spring term. Proposals for senior projects and essays are submitted in the fall term for review and approval by the senior project coordinator; they are then distributed to faculty members for review. Upon successful review, students may ask faculty members to act as senior advisers. Senior essays and projects for ARCH 491 are due in the office of the DUS by early April. Design projects for ARCH 494 are due as specified by the course instructor. All seniors must submit a portfolio of their work to the office of the DUS by late April. For all architecture majors, this portfolio must be representative of the student's design work including prerequisites and the senior project. History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism majors must also include a copy of the senior essay and other appropriate texts.

Advising and declaration of intent to major

Yale College students interested in the Architecture major must submit a Declaration of Intent to Major during the spring term of their sophomore year, after taking ARCH 150, 200, and 280. The Declaration of Intent to Major must be submitted to the office of the DUS (contact DUS for deadlines) and must include the following information: name, address, telephone number, courses related to architecture already taken, and a statement of purpose. Students should also indicate their desired concentration at this time. Additionally, students must submit an electronic portfolio representative of coursework for ARCH 150, 200, and a paper from ARCH 280. Upon the successful completion of these requirements, students are notified in writing regarding their acceptance to the major. Refer to the department website for important deadlines.

Courses in the School of Architecture Unless otherwise indicated in the course descriptions, all courses in the School of Architecture are open to majors and nonmajors with permission of the instructor and the graduate registrar. They are not available for the Credit/D/Fail option. Students are admitted on the basis of their previous coursework and previous performance.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites ARCH 150, 200, and 280

Number of courses 15 course credits (incl prereqs and senior req)

Specific courses required DesignARCH 250, 251260, 312History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and UrbanismARCH 250 or 360; ARCH 362 or elective; ARCH 260; and ARCH 312

Distribution of coursesDesign—1 elective in history and theory of arch, 1 in urbanism and landscape, 1 in materials and design, 1 in structures and computation, all approved by DUS; History, Theory, Criticism of Architecture, and Urbanism—4 electives in history and theory of arch and city, 1 elective in urbanism and landscape, or materials and design, or structures and computation; all approved by DUS.

Other requirements Orientation sessions in advanced technology, library, and shop

Senior requirement Both concentrations—portfolio representative of design work, including prereqs and senior req; DesignARCH 450 and 494; History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and UrbanismARCH 490 and 491

A liberal arts education provides an ideal framework for studying architecture. Students in the major understand and pursue architecture as a humanistic endeavor. They graduate with a comprehensive understanding of the discipline of architecture as it relates to the ideas, concepts, and methods of designing buildings, cities, and landscapes within the broader context of culture. The major includes coursework in design, history and theory, urbanism, landscape, and technology, and leads to a bachelor of arts degree. Architecture majors are prepared for advanced study in a variety of fields, including architecture, art, history of art, urban planning, environmental studies, social studies, and public affairs.

The major is open to all students; sophomores submit a Declaration of Intent to Major after taking three prerequisite courses.

The Architecture program offers several courses open to first-year students, including those listed below. First-year students may also take architecture courses offered through Yale Summer Session.

  • ARCH 006 Architectures of Urbanism: Thinking, Seeing, Writing the Just City
  • ARCH 154 Drawing Architecture
  • ARCH 260 History of Architecture to 1750
  • ARCH 312 Modern Architecture in a Global Context, 1750-present
  • ARCH 341 Globalization Space

MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE TEACHING IN YALE COLLEGE

Professors  Turner Brooks (Adjunct), Keller Easterling, Steven Harris (Adjunct), Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen, Alan Plattus, Alexander Purves (Emeritus)

Associate Professors Kyoung Sun Moon, Elihu Rubin

Assistant Professors Anthony Acciavatti (Visiting), Sunil Bald (Adjunct), Joyce Hsiang, Bimal Mendis (Adjunct)

Senior Lecturers  Marta Justo Caldeira, Bryan Fuermann

Lecturers Kyle Dugdale, Jerome Haferd, Erleen Hatfield, Justin Moore

Senior Critics  Katherine Davies, Andrei Harwell, Gavin Hogben

Critics Anne Barrett, Adam Hopfner, George Knight, Timothy Newton, M. Surry Schlabs