Global Affairs

Director of undergraduate studies: Sigga Benediktsdottir, 202 Horchow Hall, 432-3418; jackson.yale.edu/ba-degree

The Global Affairs major, administered by the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, prepares Yale students for global citizenship and service by enhancing their understanding of the world around them. Students in this interdisciplinary major develop expertise in contemporary global affairs that is strongly grounded in the social sciences.

Students in the Global Affairs major have the flexibility to shape their own curriculums according to their interests and ambitions. In the past, students have concentrated their coursework on economic development and poverty, global health, global climate policy, international relations, and foreign policy and diplomacy, with topics relevant to national and human security. 

Courses for Nonmajors

Most Global Affairs courses are open to both majors and nonmajors. If a Global Affairs course requires an application, the application will be posted on the Jackson Institute website.

Prerequisites 

There are no prerequisites for the Global Affairs major. However, students interested in applying to the major are strongly encouraged to complete the following required introductory economics sequence (ECON 108, 110, or 115; and ECON 111 or 116) and work toward the language requirement early in their course planning. An introductory analysis course, such as GLBL 121, ECON 117 or S&DS 100–106 is also suggested. These courses are all required for the major and progress towards completing them, at the time of application, will be considered.

Requirements of the Major

Thirteen term courses are required for the major in addition to a language requirement. Introductory courses in microeconomics (ECON 108, 110, or 115) and macroeconomics (ECON 111 or 116) are required, as is one intermediate course in either microeconomics or macroeconomics (ECON 121, 122, 125 or 126). All majors must take the core courses GLBL 225 and 275, and two courses in quantitative analysis, GLBL 121 and 122GLBL 121 is recommended but can be replaced by other analysis courses including ECON 117 and S&DS 100–106, with approval of the director of undergraduate studies (DUS). Majors also take four electives and one methods course chosen from an approved group of courses in the departments of Global Affairs, HistoryPolitical ScienceEconomics, and other social science departments; and GLBL 499, Senior Capstone Project. For information about which courses qualify as electives, see the Jackson Institute website and the course listings in Yale Course Search.

Language requirement Global Affairs majors are required to take a course designated L5 in a modern language other than English. In exceptional cases, a demonstration of proficiency can fulfill this requirement.

Credit/D/Fail Courses taken Credit/D/Fail may not be applied to the requirement–s of the major, with the exception that a grade of Credit in an L5 language course may be used to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language.

Roadmap See visual roadmap of the requirements.

Senior Requirement 

In the fall term of the senior year, majors must complete a capstone project in GLBL 499. Small groups of students are each assigned to a policy task force in which they apply their academic training in the social sciences to a specific problem relevant to global affairs. Each task force presents its findings and recommendations to a real-world client such as a government agency, a nongovernmental organization or nonprofit group, or a private-sector organization in the United States or abroad.

Advising and Application to the Major 

Students apply to the Global Affairs major in the fall of the sophomore year. The number of students accepted into the major is limited, and selection is competitive. The call for applications is posted each year on the Jackson Institute website, circulated through the residential college deans' offices, and noted on the Advising Resources website. For application information, visit the Jackson Institute website.

Internships Students in the major are encouraged to take a summer internship in the field of global affairs after their junior year. The Jackson Institute Career Services Office can help students find appropriate internships.

Study Abroad 

Global Affairs majors who plan to study abroad should consult the director of student affairs, Lily Sutton, to devise a course of study prior to the term abroad.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisites None

Number of courses 13 (incl senior req; excluding lang req)

Specific courses requiredECON 108, 110, or 115; ECON 111 or 116; ECON 121122125, or 126GLBL 225GLBL 275; GLBL 121; GLBL 122

Distribution of courses 4 approved electives and 1 methods course

Language requirement Advanced ability (L5) in 1 modern lang other than English

Substitution permitted With DUS approval, GLBL 121 may be replaced by other analysis courses including ECON 117 and S&DS 100–106

Senior requirement Senior capstone project in GLBL 499

The Global Affairs major, administered by the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, prepares Yale students for global leadership and service by enhancing their understanding of the world around them. Students in this interdisciplinary major develop expertise in contemporary global affairs that is informed by the social sciences.

Students in the Global Affairs major have the flexibility to shape their own curriculums according to their interests and ambitions. In the past, students have concentrated their coursework on economic development; poverty; global health; global climate policy; international relations; and foreign policy and diplomacy, with topics relevant to national and human security. All majors are required to take foundation courses, global affairs core courses, quantitative analysis and other methods courses, and to take at least four additional approved electives. During the senior year, each major completes a capstone course in which a group of eight to ten students addresses a specific policy issue and presents its findings and recommendations to a real-world organization.

Students apply to the Global Affairs major during the fall term of the sophomore year. The number of students accepted into the major is limited, and selection is competitive. Interested students are encouraged to consider the introductory economics and foreign language requirements in their course planning for the first and sophomore years. Each year the call for applications is posted on the Jackson Institute website, is circulated through the residential college deans' offices, and is noted on the Advising Resources website.

Most Jackson Institute courses are open to nonmajors, including GLBL 101. For more information about courses and the major in Global Affairs visit the Jackson Institute website.

FACULTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRAM OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS

Professors David Engerman (History), John Gaddis (History), Jacob Hacker (Political Science), Oona Hathaway (Law), Amy Kapczynski (Law, Global Health), Paul Kennedy (History), Robert T. Jensen (School of Management), James Levinsohn (Director) (School of Management), A. Mushfiq Mobarak (School of Management), Samuel Moyn (Law), Catherine Panter-Brick (Anthropology), Peter Schott (Economics, School of Management), Ian Shapiro (Political Science), Timothy Snyder (History), Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages and Literatures), Aleh Tsyvinski (Economics), Odd Arne Westad (History), Steven Wilkinson (Political Science), Ernesto Zedillo (International Economics & Politics)

Associate Professors Alexandre Debs (Political Science), Kaveh Khoshnood (School of Public Health), Jason Lyall (Political Science), Nuno Monteiro (Political Science), Marci Shore (History), Jonathan Wyrtzen (Sociology, International Affairs)

Assistant Professors Lorenzo Caliendo (Economics, School of Management), Zack Cooper (School of Public Health), Gregg Gonsalves (School of Public Health), Lloyd Grieger (Sociology), Alice Miller (School of Public Health, Law), Thania Sanchez (Political Science), Kristina Talbert-Slagle (School of Medicine, Global Health)

Senior Lecturers Marnix Amand, Sigga Benediktsdottir, Charles Hill (International Security Studies), Asha Rangappa, Justin Thomas

Lecturers Michael Brenes, Christopher Fussell, William Casey King, Nicholas Lotito (Political Science), Alice Miller (Public Health, Law), Jaimie Morse, Nathaniel Raymond, Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins, Edward Wittenstein

Senior Fellows Eric Braverman, David Brooks, Howard Dean, Janine di Giovanni, Robert Ford, Clare Lockhart, Stanley McChrystal, Rakesh Mohan, David Rank, Stephen Roach, Emma Sky