Classics

402 Phelps Hall, 203.432.0977
www.yale.edu/classics
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair
Emily Greenwood

Director of Graduate Studies
Brad Inwood (dgs.classics@yale.edu)

Professors Egbert Bakker, Kirk Freudenburg, Emily Greenwood (Classics; African American Studies), Verity Harte (Classics; Philosophy), Brad Inwood, Diana Kleiner (Classics; History of Art), Christina Kraus, Noel Lenski (Classics; History), J.G. Manning (Classics; History)

Associate Professors Milette Gaifman (Classics; History of Art), Pauline LeVen, Irene Peirano Garrison, Andrew Johnston

Assistant Professor Jessica Lamont

Lecturers Ann Hanson, Timothy Robinson, Barbara Shailor (Senior Research Scholar), Joseph Solodow

Affiliated Faculty and Secondary Appointments Harold Attridge (Divinity School), Adela Yarbro Collins (Divinity School; Emerita), John J. Collins (Divinity School), John Hare (Divinity School), Susan Matheson (Curator of Ancient Art, Yale University Art Gallery), David Quint (English), Kathryn Slanski (Humanities; Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), George Syrimis (Hellenic Studies)

Fields of Study

The degree programs in Classics seek to provide an overall knowledge of Greek and Roman civilization, combined with specialized work in a number of fields or disciplines within the total area of classical antiquity.

Admission Requirements

A minimum of three years (four preferred) of college training in one of the classical languages and two years (three preferred) in the other.

Grading and Good Standing

In addition to the Graduate School’s requirement of Honors grades in at least one yearlong course or two term courses, students must have a High Pass average in the remaining courses. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. is granted upon completion of all predissertation requirements not later than the end of the seventh term of study.

The faculty considers experience in the teaching of language and literature to be an important part of this program. Students in Classics typically teach in their third and fourth years of study.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Classical Philology

  1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  3. Departmental reading examinations in French (or Italian) and German. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the first year, the second by the end of the second year in residence.
  4. A minimum of fourteen term courses: (i) two yearlong survey courses in the history of Greek and Latin literature (four courses in total); (ii) at least four seminars, of which two have to be literary seminars in one language, and one in the other; (iii) one course in historical or comparative linguistics; (iv) one course in ancient history (either an 800-level seminar or a 600-level materials course), and one in classical art and archaeology; (v) of these fourteen courses, twelve must be taken in the first two years of study; the last two, which must be 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term.
  5. Greek and Latin composition (this requirement may but need not be satisfied by courses taken under [4] above).
  6. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the syllabus covered by the survey courses, drawn from the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year).
  7. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list, by the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  8. Special fields oral examinations will occur at the beginning of the sixth term, and consist of four areas of special concentration selected by the candidate in consultation with the DGS. One of the special fields should be related to the student’s chosen dissertation topic; the three other fields are in each of the two ancient languages/cultures; one historical topic, or a topic with historical potential, is advised. In addition to the oral exam, the student will be asked to write a short summary of the dissertation topic and submit this summary and a working dissertation title to the special fields examiners and to the dissertation adviser (who may or may not have worked on the project as a “special topic” with the student). The summary should discuss where the student’s work stands at the beginning of the term and how the student expects the research will progress over the course of the sixth term as the student writes the formal dissertation prospectus.
  9. A dissertation prospectus by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  10. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Classical Art and Archaeology

The program is designed to give a general knowledge of the development of art and architecture in the classical world from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity, combined with a detailed study of one particular period and area; and an acquaintance with the contribution made by field archaeology. The program has a strong art historical component, and it is expected that each student will take advantage of available opportunities to visit the major sites and monuments.

  1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  3. Departmental reading examinations in Italian (or French) and German. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the first year, the second by the end of the second year in residence.
  4. A minimum of fourteen term courses: (i) a minimum of six courses should be in Greek and/or Roman art and/or archaeology (at least four must be seminars); (ii) a minimum of two courses should be in a related field of the history of art, for example Medieval or Renaissance; (iii) a minimum of two courses should be in Greek or Roman history, numismatics, or papyrology; (iv) students must demonstrate a competence in Greek and Latin, usually by passing at least one 400/700-level course in each language; (v) of the remaining four courses, at least two should be seminars in Greek or Latin literature.
  5. A written examination in classical art and archaeology, by the beginning of the sixth term. The examination consists of identifications of works of art and architecture, essays, and a twenty-four-hour research paper, followed by an oral exam in four areas of Greek and Roman art and architecture (time period, locale, genre, free choice), with specific topics within those categories agreed upon in advance by the candidate, adviser, and the DGS in Classics. Consideration is normally given to the probable dissertation topic and the way in which preparation for the orals might enhance the writing of the dissertation prospectus.
  6. A dissertation prospectus, normally by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  7. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Combined Programs

Classics and Comparative Literature

Admission Requirements

Prerequisites for admission through the Department of Classics: same as for Classical Philology. (For admission requirements in the Department of Comparative Literature, consult the DGS of that department.) After admission to the Department of Classics, qualified students may apply to be admitted to this combined program, normally during the first term of residence; the directors of graduate studies of both departments should be consulted before application to the combined program is made.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Classics and Comparative Literature

  1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  2. A minimum of fourteen term courses: (i) at least seven in Classics, which includes two yearlong surveys (four courses) in the history of Greek and Latin literature, two 800-level seminars, and the proseminar in Classics; (ii) at least six courses in Comparative Literature; of these at least four courses should be on postclassical European literature; (iii) of these fourteen courses, twelve must be taken in the first two years of study; the last two, which must be Classics 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term; (iv) the course work across the two programs should include at least two courses on literary theory or methodology, and at least one course each in poetry, narrative fiction, and drama.
  3. Literary proficiency in German and in one other modern language, to be demonstrated by the end of the second year in residence.
  4. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the syllabus covered by the survey courses, drawn from the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year).
  5. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list, by the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  6. An oral examination in the Comparative Literature department on six topics appropriate to both disciplines, selected in consultation with the two directors of graduate studies, balancing a range of kinds of topics and including poetry, narrative fiction, and drama, and at least one significant cluster of postclassical texts, by the middle of the sixth term. One of the topics studied will be related to the student’s dissertation topic.
  7. A dissertation prospectus, by the end of the sixth term in residence. The prospectus must be approved by the DGS in each department (and by the Comparative Literature prospectus committee) by the end of the sixth term in residence. At least one dissertation director must come from the Comparative Literature core faculty.
  8. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Classics and History

The combined degree program in Classics and History, with a concentration in Ancient History, is offered by the Departments of Classics and History for students wishing to pursue graduate study in the history of the ancient Mediterranean and western Eurasia. Prospective students may apply through either the Department of History or the Department of Classics.

The combined degree in Classics and History offers students a comprehensive education in the fundamental skills and most current methodologies in the study of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean and its interaction with Eurasian and African cultures and landscapes. Its object is to train leaders in research and teaching by preparing them to handle the basic materials of ancient history through mastery of the traditional linguistic and technical skills. At the same time the combined degree in Classics and History encourages students to rediscover, reshape, and repurpose traditional and nontraditional source materials using the most up-to-date and sophisticated tools at the historian’s disposal.

Students are called on to complete course work in two ancient languages, historical theory, intra- and interdisciplinary skills, and fundamental research seminars. Interdisciplinary expertise is fostered through the annual seminar coordinated through the Yale Program for the Study of Ancient and Premodern Cultures and Societies (Archaia) and through required study in ancillary fields. Exams are rigorous and aimed at helping students hone skills and explore new terrain in ancient studies. Students are encouraged to take advantage of Yale’s superior collections and library resources in order to explore new avenues in their learning and approaches to historical problems. Yale’s outstanding faculty in Classics, History, and related disciplines, such as Near Eastern languages and cultures, religious studies, art history, and anthropology, work together to ensure broad and deep learning that will enable our students to become world leaders in the field.

Admission Requirements

Prerequisites for admission through the Department of Classics are the same as for admission to the Classics degree program, i.e., the equivalent of three years (four preferred) of college training in one of the classical languages and two years (three preferred) in the other. Prerequisites for admission through the Department of History are the equivalent of three years (four preferred) of college training in one of the classical languages and two years in another ancient language, not necessarily Greek or Latin.

Requirements for the Combined Ph.D. Degree in Classics and History

  1. A minimum of fourteen term courses, including: (i) the historical methods and theory course, Approaching History (HIST 500); (ii) Archaia core seminar (CLSS 815 or equivalent); (iii) two graduate-level courses in two separate ancient languages. For students who are admitted in Classics, these must be Greek and Latin. Students who are admitted in History must study either Greek or Latin, and they may study both but may also choose another ancient language to fulfill this requirement. The surveys of Greek and Latin literature offered by Classics are encouraged but not mandatory for fulfillment of this requirement; (iv) two skills courses. These may include topics selected from epigraphy (epigraphy courses may be used to fulfill the language requirement concurrently); archaeology; art history; papyrology; numismatics; digital data, GIS, digital humanities, vel sim.; an advanced course in a non-classical ancient language (no more than one such course may be used in fulfillment of this requirement). Students are also encouraged to take advantage of educational opportunities outside of Yale (American Numismatic Society Summer Seminar; an archaeological excavation, e.g., the Gabii project); (v) four courses (at least two of which must be research seminars) in the history of the ancient Mediterranean world; historical courses that have a heavy skill component may be used concurrently to fulfill the skills requirement; (vi) two courses outside of ancient Mediterranean history that cover two separate disciplinary areas. These courses will be in the history of different periods or different regions, or in other disciplines of the humanities or social sciences outside of history, or in the physical sciences. Possibilities include (but are not limited to): social sciences (economics, anthropology, sociology, environmental science, statistics); religion (religious studies, Divinity School, Jewish studies); law (history of law, comparative law, international law); Near Eastern languages and civilizations (Egyptian language, Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, Arabic); anthropology and archaeology (cultural anthropology, archaeological sciences); physical and biological sciences (paleoclimatology, ecology and forestry, genetics, medicine).
  2. Classics proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines, to be taken in the first year in residence (not for credit).
  3. Reading examinations in German, and in either French or Italian. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the second term in residence, the second by the end of the fourth term in residence.
  4. Translation examinations in two ancient languages. For students admitted through Classics, these must be Greek and Latin. For students admitted through History, at least one must be either Greek or Latin. Greek and Latin examinations will be based on the Ancient History Greek and Latin reading lists and will consist of four passages in each language, at least one of which will be poetry and one documentary (epigraphy/papyrology). Some History students may find that expertise in another language—such as Hebrew, Aramaic/Syriac, Demotic, Coptic, Classical Armenian, or Sanskrit—is most beneficial for their research and teaching trajectory. Reading lists for these non-classical languages will be devised by the student in collaboration with the faculty adviser and other relevant member(s) of the Yale faculty, and fixed in writing no later than the end of the fourth term in residence. Examinations in these languages will also consist of four passages to be set and evaluated by faculty expert in the given language. Translation exams in all languages must be taken at the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  5. A general examination in Ancient History during the third year and no later than the end of the sixth term in residence. This is to be broken into one major and two minor fields. For the major field students must prepare an 8,000-word essay in advance of the oral examination. For each of the minor fields, students must prepare a syllabus for an undergraduate class. The written essays and syllabi must be submitted by a fixed date, typically on the Friday before Thanksgiving or spring break. Oral exams will be completed shortly afterward to ensure time for the completion of the dissertation prospectus.
  6. A dissertation prospectus by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  7. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Classics and Philosophy

The Classics and Philosophy Program is a combined program, offered by the Departments of Classics and Philosophy, for students wishing to pursue graduate study in ancient philosophy. Suitably qualified students may apply for entry to the program either through the Classics department for the Classics track, details of which are given below, or through the Philosophy department for the Philosophy track, details of which may be found at http://philosophy.yale.edu/graduate-program/classics-and-philosophy-program. Applicants to the combined program are strongly encouraged to submit a writing sample on a topic in ancient philosophy.

Applicants for the Classics track of the combined program must satisfy the general requirements for admission to the Classics graduate program, in addition to the requirements of the Classics track of the combined program. Applicants for the Philosophy track of the combined program must satisfy the general requirements for admission to the Philosophy graduate program, in addition to the requirements of the Philosophy track of the combined program.

The combined program is overseen by an interdepartmental committee currently consisting of Verity Harte, David Charles, and Brad Inwood together with the DGS in Classics and the DGS in Philosophy.

Requirements of the Classics Track of the Classics and Philosophy Program

  1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  3. Departmental reading examinations in French (or Italian) and German. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the first year, the second by the end of the second year in residence.
  4. A minimum of fourteen term courses, of which (i) at least four should be in ancient philosophy, including at least two involving original language work; (ii) of ten remaining courses, five should be in Classics, five in Philosophy, including (a) of five in Classics, either two terms of history of Greek literature or two terms of history of Latin literature are required, and two courses at 700/800-level in Greek or Latin; and (b) of five in Philosophy, one in history of philosophy other than ancient philosophy, three in nonhistorical philosophy. It is recommended that students without formal training in logic take a logic course appropriate to their philosophical background.
  5. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classics and Philosophy Ph.D. reading list for the Classics track of the program, by the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  6. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the Classics and Philosophy Ph.D. reading list for the Classics track of the program, by the end of the fifth term in residence and consisting of one hourlong oral examination on nonphilosophical Greek and Latin works from the list (which may be taken in two parts, one half-hour exam on Greek and one half-hour exam on Latin) and one hourlong oral examination on philosophical Greek and Latin works from the list, to be completed by the end of the fifth term in residence. Students may choose to take the nonphilosophical Greek and/or Latin half-hour component of their oral examination in conjunction with taking the history of Greek or Latin literature, along with the Classical Philology cohort, in May of the year in which the corresponding history is taken.
  7. One of the two qualifying papers required for the Ph.D. in Philosophy by the end of the sixth term in residence; this paper should be on a philosophical topic other than ancient philosophy.
  8. Oral examinations/special fields in two areas of concentration selected by the candidate in consultation with the DGS in Classics and the program committee, one of which must be in ancient philosophy and which will in addition include a written component, while the other must cover a classical topic other than ancient philosophy, by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  9. A dissertation prospectus, by the end of the seventh term in residence.
  10. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Classics and Renaissance Studies

Admission Requirements

Same as for Classical Philology. Applications should be submitted directly to Classics with an indication that the student wishes to apply for the combined degree in Classics and Renaissance Studies.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Classics and Renaissance Studies

  1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  3. Sixteen term courses, divided equally between Classics and Renaissance Studies: (i) eight courses in Classics; (ii) including two yearlong surveys (four courses) of Greek and Latin literature; (iii) at least three seminars; (iv) eight courses in Renaissance Studies; (v) two terms of the Renaissance Studies Core Course; (vi) six additional term courses to be taken in at least two disciplines (such as literature, history, history of art, music, religious studies, etc.); one of these courses should meet the normal Classics requirements of a course in classical art or archaeology; (vii) of these sixteen courses, fourteen must be taken in the first two years of study; the last two, which must be Classics 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term.
  4. Literary proficiency in Italian, as examined by Renaissance Studies, and in a second language, normally German or French.
  5. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the syllabus covered by the survey courses, drawn from the Classics and Renaissance Studies Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year).
  6. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classics and Renaissance Studies Ph.D. reading list, by the end of the fifth term in residence.
  7. Oral examinations on special fields appropriate to both disciplines, by the beginning of the sixth term. Seventy-five minutes on three or four topics in classical Greek and Latin literature; and forty-five minutes (three fifteen-minute questions) on Renaissance topics to be divided between at least two disciplines, i.e., literature, history, history of art, etc., selected in consultation with the directors of graduate studies in both disciplines. One of the fields studied will be related to the student’s dissertation topic. In addition to the oral exam, the student will be asked to write a short summary of the dissertation topic and submit this summary and a working dissertation title to the special fields examiners and to the dissertation adviser (who may or may not have worked on the project as a “special topic” with the student). The summary should discuss where the student’s work stands at the beginning of the term and how the student expects the research will progress over the course of the sixth term as the student writes the formal dissertation prospectus.
  8. A dissertation prospectus, by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  9. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

For information about the Ph.D. program in Graeco-Arabic Studies, please contact Professor Kevin van Bladel, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.

Archaia Graduate Qualification

The Yale Program for the Study of Ancient and Premodern Cultures and Societies (Archaia) offers a graduate qualification. For further information, see Archaia, under Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.A. The Department of Classics does not admit students for a terminal master’s degree, nor does it award an M.A. en route to the Ph.D. degree. If, however, a student admitted for the Ph.D. leaves the program prior to completion of the doctoral degree, the student may be eligible to receive a terminal master’s degree upon completion of eight courses, ordinarily with a High Pass average in two successive terms.


Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Classics, Yale University, PO Box 208266, New Haven CT 06520-8266.

Courses

CLSS 601a / MDVL 571a, Introduction to Latin PaleographyN. Raymond Clemens

Latin paleography from the fourth century CE to ca. 1500. Topics include the history and development of national hands; the introduction and evolution of Caroline minuscule, pre-gothic, gothic, and humanist scripts (both cursive and book hands); the production, circulation, and transmission of texts (primarily Latin, with reference to Greek and Middle English); advances in the technical analysis and digital manipulation of manuscripts. Seminars are based on the examination of codices and fragments in the Beinecke Library; students select a manuscript for class presentation and final paper.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 602b / MDVL 563b, Advanced Latin PaleographyBarbara Shailor

The challenges of using hand-produced Latin manuscripts in research, with an emphasis on texts from the late Middle Ages. Gothic cursive scripts and book hands ca. 1200–ca. 1500; fragments of unidentified codices; complex or composite codices with heavy interlinear and marginal annotations. Manuscripts and fragments selected largely from collections in the Beinecke Library. Prerequisite: CLSS 601 or permission of the instructor.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 605a, Greek PapyrologyAnn Hanson

Literary and documentary papyri of Greek and Roman Egypt, concentrating on documents housed in the Beinecke Library from the late Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Topics include using papyri as sources for social and other histories; gaining familiarity with the language of the papyri; and the reading of literary and documentary hands.
T 2:30pm-4:30pm

CLSS 645a, Roman NumismaticsBenjamin Hellings

This course aims to familiarize students with the study of coins as evidence for the ancient world and focuses on Roman numismatic iconography and the Roman economy. The course moves at a rapid pace, with seven weekly essays and two larger research projects. Prerequisite: a good understanding of Roman history.
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 811a / ARCG 611a / NELC 611a / RLST 833a, The Ancient Egyptian Temple as Cosmos: Correlation of Architecture and Decoration ProgramChristina Geisen

The course focuses on the correlation of archaeology, iconography, and philology by analyzing ancient Egyptian temples under the specific consideration of the interplay of architecture and decoration program. The different types of temples and their developments over time are discussed. The main focus is the function of each temple type, which can only be understood by analyzing the architecture of the monument, its decoration program, related texts (such as rituals, myths, and festival description, but also historical texts), and its place in the cultic landscape of the specific location. The class also provides an overview of rituals performed and festivals celebrated in the temples, as well as of the administrative sphere of the temple. Optional field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to see the Temple of Dendur. No previous knowledge of ancient Egyptian culture or languages is necessary; all texts are read in translation.
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 815b / ANTH 531b / ARCG 531b / EALL 773b / HIST 502b / HSAR 564b / JDST 653b / NELC 533b / RLST 803b, Sensory Experiences in Ancient RitualCarolyn Laferriere and Andrew Turner

A comparative exploration of the role the senses played in the performance of ancient and premodern ritual, drawing from a range of ancient traditions including those of Greece, Rome, and Egypt, and from cultural traditions of the Near East, India, China, and the New World. Placing particular emphasis on the relationship between art and ritual, we discuss the methods available for reconstructing ancient sensory experience, how the ancient cultures conceived of the senses and perception, and how worshipers’ sensory experiences, whether visual, sonic, olfactory, gustatory, or haptic, were integral aspects in their engagement with the divine within religious ritual. This seminar incorporates material in the Yale Art Gallery.
Th 9:25am-11:15am

CLSS 830a, BeautyPauline LeVen

This seminar concentrates on the ancient Greek discourse on beauty, from Homer to the period known as the Second Sophistic. Weekly discussions of ancient Greek texts (Homer, archaic lyric poetry, Plato, Xenophon, Philostratus, Dio Chrysostom, Greek novels) and critical literature on the topic focus on the following themes: beauty and the body; beauty and the senses; beauty and the good; beauty and the arts; beauty and the beasts.    Prerequisite: knowledge of ancient Greek. Students with no knowledge of Greek interested in taking the course should contact the instructor. 
F 10am-12pm

CLSS 847a / HIST 508a, Climate, Environment, and Ancient HistoryJoseph Manning

An overview of recent work in paleoclimatology with an emphasis on new climate proxy records and how they are or can be used in historical analysis. We examine in detail several recent case studies at the nexus of climate and history. Attention is paid to critiques of recent work as well as trends in the field.
F 3:30pm-5:20pm

CLSS 861b / HIST 503b, Recent Trends, Current Problems, and New Approaches to Ancient HistoryJoseph Manning

Current trends in the field and an examination of recent work, new theory, and new material. An overview of theory and method in ancient history. Each week is devoted to a case study or a recent monograph in the field.
F 3:30pm-5:20pm

CLSS 865b / PHIL 748b, Plato’s TheaetetusVerity Harte and David Charles

The class reads and discusses the Greek text of Plato’s Theaetetus, a central work of Plato’s philosophy and an important work in the history of philosophy. Focused on the nature of knowledge, the dialogue is notable for a series of arguments involving central notions of Plato’s philosophy: knowledge, definition, perception, false judgment. The class is a core course for the combined Ph.D. program in Classics and Philosophy. The course is open to all graduate students in Philosophy or Classics who have suitable preparation in Attic Greek and some prior knowledge of ancient philosophy. Others interested in taking or attending the class must have prior permission of the instructors. Undergraduates are not normally admitted.
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

CLSS 877a / CPLT 556a / RLST 613a, Rhetorics of the Ancient WorldMichal Beth Dinkler and Irene Peirano

This interdisciplinary course takes as its starting point Greco-Roman rhetoric as a codified system and explores its relevance for contemporary interpretation of ancient texts. Moving back and forth between rhetoric as a set of norms and rhetoric as a condition of discourse, we engage with contemporary rhetorical studies in Classics and Biblical studies. Topics include rhetoric and narrative, exemplarity and imitation across the literary and spiritual realms, “anti-rhetoricism,” embedded rhetorical performances (e.g., speeches, oratory, etc.), and nonverbal forms of persuasion (e.g., visual, emotional, etc.).
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 881a, Proseminar: Classical StudiesMilette Gaifman

An introduction to the bibliography and disciplines of classical scholarship. Faculty address larger questions of method and theory, as well as specialized subdisciplines such as linguistics, papyrology, epigraphy, paleography, and numismatics. Required of all entering graduate students.
W 10:30am-12:20pm

CLSS 886a / PHIL 741a, What Is Aristotelian Hylomorphism?David Charles

The aim of the seminar is to examine the extent to which Aristotle’s version of hylomorphism as applied to psychological phenomena (such as the emotions, desire, perception, and thought) was modified and criticized by later philosophers. We assess the hypothesis that Aristotle’s discussion of these issues was substantially modified by later philosophers and commentators in such a way as to set up (1) contemporary versions of hylomorphism and (2) the mind/body problem as formulated by Descartes. 
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

CLSS 887b / PHIL 746b, Cicero and Ancient Ethics: The Dialogue On Moral Ends (De finibus bonorum et malorum)Brad Inwood

Cicero’s most important and influential work on moral philosophy is the dialogue On Moral Ends (De finibus bonorum et malorum). Written within the general framework of eudaimonism, the dialogue expounds on and criticizes the ethical theory of three contemporary schools: Epicurean, Stoic, and Peripatetic. On Moral Ends presents important debates in ethics, gives us extensive evidence for Hellenistic philosophy in general, and had significant influence on moral theory in the early modern period. We read the entire dialogue, with more emphasis on the Stoic (books 3–4) and Peripatetic (book 5) debates than on the Epicurean (books 1–2). In class we work predominantly from the translation by Raphael Woolf, but Latin readers are expected to read key parts of the dialogue in Latin as well; there will be a separate meeting for discussion of issues that arise from the Latin text. Prerequisite: graduate enrollment in Philosophy or Classics, or permission of the instructor.
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

CLSS 889b, Greek EpigraphyFrançois Gerardin

This course provides an introduction to Greek epigraphy—the study of inscriptions written in ancient Greek—its methods, scholarship, and aims. Key texts from the corpus are translated, analyzed, and discussed in class. We read some inscriptions in verse (“metric inscriptions”) along with prose texts. Themes for discussion are linguistic (literacy, dialects, multilingualism) and/or historical (education, law, mythography). The course also offers essential preparation for texts included in the Combined Program in Classics and History reading list.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 890a / ARCG 581a / HSAR 581a, Roman Painting: Achievement and LegacyDiana Kleiner

Roman mural painting in all its aspects and innovations. Individual scenes and complete ensembles in palaces, villas, and houses in Rome and Pompeii are explored, as are their rediscovery and revival in the Renaissance and neoclassical period. Special attention is paid to the four architectural styles; history and mythological painting; the impact of the theater; the part played by landscape, genre, and still life; the accidental survival of painted portraiture; and the discovery and rejection of trompe l’oeil illusionism and linear perspective.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

CLSS 892b, Narrative and VisionKirk Freudenburg

This seminar explores the theory and practice of image production (enargeia, descriptio: the production of a full visual presence through verbal means) in ancient epic, with special focus on the narratological ends to which the poet’s special “visualizing effects” are the means. The main epic poet studied is Vergil, but accounting for his visual practices requires a much fuller accounting of enargeia in the various “visualizing” poetic traditions to which he refers (especially Homer, Lucretius, and Catullus); in rhetoric, both its theory and practice (Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian); in historiography (Livy and Tacitus); and in other “actual” visual media such as wall paintings, sculpture, and architecture. We look at the related topics of ekphrasis, Roman concepts of “nobility” and “spectacle,” and to further developments in the production of visualization in the epics of Ovid, Statius, Lucan, and Valerius Flaccus, as well as to the basic practices, categories, and theorizations of film narratology (Bordwell, Mulvey, Verstraten).
W 2:30pm-4:20pm

CLSS 896a, History of Greek Literature IEgbert Bakker

A comprehensive treatment of Greek literature from Homer to the imperial period, with an emphasis on archaic and Hellenistic poetry. The course prepares for the comprehensive oral qualifying examinations. The student is expected to read extensively in the original language, working toward familiarity with the range and variety of the literature.
MW 1pm-2:15pm

CLSS 897b, History of Greek Literature IIEmily Greenwood

A continuation of CLSS 896a.
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

CLSS 900a or b, Directed ReadingStaff

By arrangement with faculty.
HTBA

GREK 750a, Euripides’s Late TragediesEgbert Bakker

Close reading of three late plays of Euripides, Helen, Ion, and Iphigenia in Tauris. Class discussion focuses on Euripides’s literary and dramatic technique and on the issues of myth, geography, as well as cultural and personal identity in these tragedies. We also consider how the plays (qualified as “romantic tragedies,” “paratragedies,” and “tragicomedies”) question the identity of the tragic genre and open new dramatic possibilities at the end of the fifth century BCE.
MW 9am-10:15am

GREK 754b, Greek Myth, Fiction, and Science FictionPauline LeVen

Relationships among ancient Greek myths, fiction, and speculative/science fiction, with attention to interpretive approaches and methodologies. Narrative modes of representing reality; distinguishing fiction from myth and science fiction; cultural uses of myth and fiction. Readings include works by Homer, Longus, Lucian, and Philostratus.
MW 1pm-2:15pm

GREK 763b, Praxis and Theory of the Greek SymposiumEgbert Bakker

This course is a study (reading in the original, interpretation, and discussion) of a selection of texts pertaining to the ancient Greek symposium (a wine-drinking event by elite males) as a central cultural institution. Readings include poetic texts (“songs”) that were meant to be sung and performed by the participants (“symposiasts”); and prose representations of the symposium as an imagined event in which philosophical ideas were put forward.
TTh 9am-10:15am

LATN 714b, Roman Civil WarsIrene Peirano

An examination of the ways in which Romans constructed and represented their civil wars in literature across a variety of genres (epic, lyric, historiography), authors (Vergil, Lucan, Caesar, Sallust), and time periods (late republic, empire).
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

LATN 721a, Vergil’s AeneidKirk Freudenburg

An in-depth study of Vergil’s Aeneid within its political context.
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

LATN 762a, The Histories of TacitusChristina Kraus

Close reading of Tacitus’s Histories and parallel passages from the other works, with attention to his syntax and style. The influence of Tacitus’s background and experience on his narrative is focal throughout.
TTh 9am-10:15am

LATN 790b, Latin Syntax and StylisticsJoseph Solodow

A systematic review of syntax and an introduction to Latin style. Selections from Latin prose authors are read and analyzed, and students compose short pieces of Latin prose. For students with some experience reading Latin literature who desire a better foundation in forms, syntax, idiom, and style.
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm