East Asian Studies

The MacMillan Center
320 Luce Hall, 203.432.3426
http://ceas.yale.edu
M.A.

Chair
Jing Tsu (jing.tsu@yale.edu)

Director of Graduate Studies
Peter Perdue (RKZ 242, 617.905.3702, peter.c.perdue@yale.edu)

Professors Daniel Botsman (History), Kang-i Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Fabian Drixler (History), Aaron Gerow (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies), Valerie Hansen (History), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Tina Lu (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Peter Perdue (History), Frances Rosenbluth (Political Science), Helen Siu (Anthropology), Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Comparative Literature), Anne Underhill (Anthropology), Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professors William Honeychurch (Anthropology), Michael Hunter (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Hwansoo Kim (Religious Studies), Chloë Starr (Divinity)

Assistant Professors Lucas Bender (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Eric Greene (Religious Studies), Denise Ho (History), Seth Jacobowitz (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Daniel Mattingly (Political Science)

Senior Lecturer Pauline Lin (East Asian Languages & Literatures)

Lecturers Charles Chang, Gabrielle Niu, Young Sun Park, Michael Thornton

Senior Lectors II Seungja Choi, Angela Lee-Smith

Senior Lectors Hsiu-hsien Chan, Min Chen, Koichi Hiroe, Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Fan Liu, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Masahiko Seto, Jianhua Shen, Mari Stever, Wei Su, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Yu-lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu, Yongtao Zhang, William Zhou

Lector Aoi Saito

Fields of Study

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in East Asian Studies is a multidisciplinary program offering a concentrated course of study designed to provide a broad understanding of the people, history, culture, contemporary society, politics, and economy of China, Japan, or a transnational region within East Asia. This program is designed for students preparing to go on to the doctorate in one of the disciplines of East Asian Studies (e.g., anthropology; economics; history; history of art; language and literature, including comparative literature, film studies, and theater studies; political science; sociology; etc.), as well as for those students seeking a terminal M.A. degree before entering the business world, the media, government service, or a professional school.

Course of Study for the M.A. Degree

The East Asian Studies graduate program is designed to be completed in either a one-year or a two-year track. The two-year track requires the preparation of a master’s thesis and is therefore ideal for students who are keen to pursue focused, independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. It also provides students with an opportunity to pursue additional disciplinary and language training. Students who enter the two-year track with a strong command of one East Asian language will be encouraged to consider beginning a second (or third) language.

In general, students focus their course work on the study of China, Japan, or transnational East Asia. Some students may prefer to focus their course work on one or two disciplines, in addition to language study and courses focused on East Asia. Others may create a highly interdisciplinary program, taking courses in traditional disciplines such as history, literature, political science, art history, or anthropology, as well as in Yale’s professional schools.

Applicants to the East Asian Studies graduate program must indicate on their application whether they are applying to the one-year or the two-year track.

Requirements for the M.A. Degree: One-Year Track

The program of study for completion of the degree on the one-year track consists of eight term courses that must include two terms of language study at or above Yale’s third-year level (unless the language requirement has already been met through previous study or native fluency), plus six other courses selected from the University’s offerings of advanced language study and seminars related to East Asia at the graduate level. For those who meet the language requirement at matriculation, two of the required eight courses may be advanced training in a particular discipline (e.g., economics, history, political theory, statistics, etc.) with no explicit focus on East Asia, but related to the student’s professional goals. The course of study must be approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS).

Special Requirements

Students must earn two Honors grades (“H”) over the course of their two terms at Yale. Honors grades earned in any language course cannot be counted toward satisfying this requirement, except with the permission of the DGS.

Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Two-Year Track

The program of study for completion of the degree on the two-year track consists of sixteen term courses that must include four terms of language study, two terms of which must be at Yale’s fourth-year level (unless the language requirement has already been met through previous study or native fluency), plus twelve other courses selected from the University’s offerings of advanced language study and seminars related to East Asia at the graduate level. Students who have achieved advanced proficiency in one East Asian language are strongly encouraged to pursue study of a second East Asian language, but for those who have met the language requirement in one language at matriculation, two of the required sixteen courses may be advanced training in a particular discipline (e.g., economics, history, political theory, statistics, etc.) with no explicit focus on East Asia, but related to the student’s professional goals. The course of study must be approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS).

Special Requirements

Students must earn four Honors grades (“H”) over the course of their four terms at Yale. Honors grades earned in any language course cannot be counted toward satisfying this requirement, except with the permission of the DGS. A master’s thesis is also required.

Master’s Thesis

A master’s thesis is required of students enrolled in the two-year degree program. The master’s thesis is based on research in a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member with specialized competence in the chosen topic. M.A. students must register for EAST 900, which may count toward the sixteen required courses. EAST 900 may not be taken for audit. Students may register for an additional independent study to prepare topics and begin research. The master’s thesis must be prepared according to CEAS guidelines and is due in the student’s second year on a mid-December date (if completed in the fall term) or an early-May date (if completed in the spring term) as specified by CEAS.

Joint-Degree Programs

The Council on East Asian Studies (CEAS) collaborates with three of Yale’s professional schools—Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, and Public Health—and has developed joint-degree programs that offer a strong connection between two demanding courses of study while also fulfilling the requirements of each separate school. Only students enrolled in the two-year track of the East Asian Studies M.A. degree program are eligible for a joint degree.

Each joint program leads to the simultaneous award of two graduate professional degrees: the M.A. in East Asian Studies from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and an M.F., M.E.M., M.E.Sc., M.F.S., J.D., or M.P.H. from the relevant professional school. Students can earn the two degrees simultaneously in less time than if they were pursued sequentially.

With the exception of the joint M.A./J.D. program, which requires four years, completion of all requirements takes three years. Typically candidates spend the first year in one program and the second year in the partner program. During the third and final year of study, students register in one program each term. Joint-degree students are guided in this process by a committee composed of the DGS and a faculty member of the relevant professional school.

Candidates must submit formal applications to both the Graduate School and the relevant professional school and be admitted separately to each school, i.e., each school makes its decision independently. It is highly recommended that students apply to and enter a joint-degree program from the outset, although it is possible to apply to the second program once matriculated at Yale.


Program materials are available upon request to the Council on East Asian Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; e-mail, eastasian.studies@yale.edu; website, http://ceas.yale.edu. Applications are available online at http://gsas.yale.edu/admission-graduate-school; e-mail, graduate.admissions@yale.edu.

Courses

Please consult the course information available online at http://ceas.yale.edu/academics/courses and http://courses.yale.edu for a complete list of East Asian-related courses offered at Yale University.

EAST 500a / HSAR 803a, Reflecting Truth: Meiji Photography between Performativity and Representation, Modernity and EmpireAyelet Zohar

Celebrating 150 years since the Meiji Restoration (1868) is an ideal opportunity to look back and ponder the engagement with an alternative history of photography, from a Japanese point of view. Photography arrived in Japan soon after its creation in the UK and France (1839), and first images were created as soon as 1848 in Kagoshima and Nagasaki. We consider the two paths photography developed in Japan, and their intersections: experimental approaches with performative modes of execution (i.e., direct light, opaque image, camera-less photographs, etc.), versus representations of Japan, a method that can be studied through two tracks—the creation of exotic, nonmodern images for the Western, consuming eye; and the documentation of Japan’s rapid modernization and political developments into settlement, nationalism, colonialism, and militarism.
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

EAST 511b / RLST 598b, Modern Korean Buddhism from Sri Lanka to JapanHwansoo Kim

This course situates modern Korean Buddhism in the global context of the late nineteenth century to the present. Through critical examination of the dynamic relationship between Korean Buddhism and the Buddhisms of key East Asian cities—Shanghai, Tokyo, Taipei, and Lhasa—the course seeks to understand modern East Asian Buddhism in a transnational light. Discussion includes analyzing the impact of Christian missionaries, pan-Asian and global ideologies, colonialism, Communism, capitalism, war, science, hypermodernity, and atheism.
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

EAST 573a / EALL 873a / HIST 873a, China and the World circa 1900Peter Perdue and Jing Tsu

Reading and discussion of significant themes in China and world history in the first decade of the twentieth century. We concentrate on topics that contain international, transnational, and comparative implications, and include discussion of literary and historical material. Most readings are in English, but selected primary sources in Asian languages may be used. Open to all History, East Asian Studies, and East Asian Languages and Literatures students, and others by request. Includes research paper and weekly writing exercises. Prerequisite: knowledge of one foreign language, European or Asian.
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

EAST 575b / ANTH 575b, Hubs, Mobilities, and Global CitiesHelen Siu

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

EAST 806b / EALL 806b / FILM 921b, Research in Japanese Film HistoryAaron Gerow

This seminar covers the methods and problems of researching and writing Japanese film history. We review the theoretical issues involved in historiography in general and film historiography in particular, and then consider how these are pertinent to the study of Japanese cinema history. Our approach is critical, as we examine several recent examples of Japanese film historiography, as well as practical, as we explore various methods and strategies for researching Japanese film history. We particularly focus on the Japanese cinema’s historical relation to the nation, especially in terms of how cinema may help us historicize the nation, and vice versa. Students develop their own research project using the unique collections at Yale. Knowledge of Japanese is helpful but not essential.
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

EAST 900a or b, Master’s ThesisStaff

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.
HTBA

EAST 910a or b, Independent StudyStaff

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.
HTBA