East Asian Studies

Director of undergraduate studies: Frances Rosenbluth, 308 RKZ, 432-5256, frances.rosenbluth@yale.edu; ceas.yale.edu

FACULTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRAM OF EAST ASIAN STUDIES

Professors Daniel Botsman (History), Kang-i Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Deborah Davis (Sociology), Fabian Drixler (History), Aaron Gerow (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies), Valerie Hansen (History), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), William Kelly (Anthropology), Tina Lu (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Peter Perdue (History), Frances Rosenbluth (Political Science), Helen Siu (Anthropology), William Summers (History of Science & Medicine), Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Comparative Literature), Anne Underhill (Anthropology), Mimi Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professors William Honeychurch (Anthropology), Andrew Quintman (Religious Studies), Chloe Starr (Divinity School)

Assistant Professors Lucas Bender (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Eric Greene (Religious Studies), Denise Ho (History), Michael Hunter (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Seth Jacobowitz (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Youn-mi Kim (History of Art), Eric Weese (Economics)

Senior Lecturers Annping Chin (History), Pauline Lin (East Asian Languages & Literatures)

Lecturers Marc Opper, Cindi Textor, Klaus Yamamoto-Hammering, Soo Ryon Yoon

Senior Lector II Seungja Choi

Senior Lectors Hsiu-hsien Chan, Min Chen, Koichi Hiroe, Angela Lee-Smith, Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Fan Liu, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Yu-lin Wang Saussy, Masahiko Seto, Jianhua Shen, Mari Stever, Wei Su, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu, Yongtao Zhang, William Zhou

Lectors Aoi Saito, Chuanmei Sun

In the East Asian Studies major, students focus on a country or an area within East Asia and concentrate their work in the humanities or the social sciences. The major offers a liberal education that serves as excellent preparation for graduate study or for business and professional careers in which an understanding of East Asia is essential.

The major The major in East Asian Studies is interdisciplinary, and students typically select classes from a wide variety of disciplines. The proposed course of study must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

The prerequisite to the major is completion of study at the L2 level of an East Asian language taught at Yale or the equivalent. Beyond this prerequisite, the major consists of thirteen course credits, which may include up to six taken in a preapproved program of study abroad. Six course credits must be taken in East Asian language courses, including a course at the L4 level and one year of advanced study (L5) with readings in the East Asian language.

Beyond the language requirement, the major includes seven course credits, six in the country or area of concentration and one outside it. Of the course credits in the area of concentration, one must be in the premodern period, at least two must be seminars, and one is the senior requirement (see below). These courses are normally taken at Yale during the academic year, but with prior approval of the director of undergraduate studies the requirement may be fulfilled through successful course work undertaken elsewhere.

Credit/D/Fail A maximum of one course taken Credit/D/Fail may be counted toward the requirements of the major, with permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

Senior requirement During the senior year, all students must satisfy a senior requirement consisting of a major research project that uses Chinese, Japanese, or Korean-language materials, reflects an up-to-date understanding of the region, and demonstrates a strong command of written English. This requirement can be met in one of three ways. Students may take a seminar that relates to the country or area of concentration, culminating in a senior thesis. Alternatively, students who are unable to write a senior essay in a seminar may complete a one-term senior essay in EAST 480 or a one-credit, two-term senior research project in EAST 491, 492 culminating in an essay. The adviser for the senior project should be a faculty member associated with the Council on East Asian Studies with a reading knowledge of the target language materials consulted for the essay.

Selection of courses Upon entering the major, students are expected to draw up an intellectually coherent sequence of courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. They must consult with the director of undergraduate studies each term concerning their course schedules. They should identify as soon as possible a faculty adviser in their area of specialization. As a multidisciplinary program, East Asian Studies draws on the resources of other departments and programs in the University. Students are encouraged to examine the offerings of other departments in both the humanities and the social sciences, as well as residential college seminars, for additional relevant courses. The stated area of concentration of each student determines the relevance and acceptability of other courses. For a complete listing of courses approved for the major, see the Council East Asian Studies Web site.

Courses in the graduate and professional schools Qualified students may elect pertinent courses in the Graduate School and in some of the professional schools with permission of the instructor, the director of undergraduate studies, and the director of graduate studies or the dean or registrar of the professional school.

Combined B.A./M.A. degree program Exceptionally able and well-prepared students may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. See "Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" in section K of the Academic Regulations. Interested students should consult the director of undergraduate studies prior to the fifth term of enrollment for specific requirements in East Asian Studies.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisite L2 level of an East Asian lang taught at Yale or the equivalent

Number of courses 13 course credits beyond prereq (incl senior req); up to 6 may be in preapproved study abroad

Distribution of courses 6 course credits in East Asian lang courses, incl 1 L4 course and 1 year at L5 level with readings in the lang; 6 addtl course credits in country or area of concentration, incl 1 in premodern era and 2 sems; 1 course credit on East Asia outside country or area of concentration

Senior requirement Senior sem culminating in a senior thesis, or one-term senior essay in EAST 480, or one-credit, two-term senior research project in EAST 491, 492

* EAST 145a, Cross-Cultural Narratives of Desire William Summers

Discourses of desire as reflected in literature, history, popular culture, medicine, and science, with both Western and non-Western examples. Connections with shifting notions of gender and sexuality; intersections with race, class, and culture.  HU

EAST 301b / HIST 307b, The Making of Japan's Great Peace, 1550–1850 Fabian Drixler

Examination of how, after centuries of war in Japan and overseas, the Tokugawa shogunate built a peace that lasted more than 200 years. Japan's urban revolution, the eradication of Christianity, the Japanese discovery of Europe, and the question of whether Tokugawa Japan is a rare example of a complex and populous society that achieved ecological sustainability.  HU

* EAST 309a / HIST 309Ja, Uses of the Past in Modern China Denise Ho

Modern China's use of the past in state-sponsored narratives of nation, in attempts to construct heritage by elites and intellectuals, and in grassroots projects of remembrance. Theories on history and memory; primary sources in English translation; case studies from twentieth-century China. Interdisciplinary readings in art history, anthropology, cultural studies, and history.  WR, HU

* EAST 326b / HIST 326Jb, Yale and Japan Daniel Botsman

Exploration of Yale's rich historical connections to Japan. Focus on use of the University's museum and library collections to learn about various aspects of the Japanese past, from ancient times to the post-World War II era. Knowledge of Japanese helpful but not required.  WR, HU

* EAST 335a / RLST 135a, Zen Buddhism Eric Greene

Survey of the history and teachings of Zen Buddhism in China and Japan. Emphasis on reading and interpretation of primary Zen texts in their historical and religious context, along with investigation of modern interpretations and appropriations of Zen in the West.  HU

EAST 338a / ECON 338a / GLBL 318a, The Next China Stephen Roach

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China's need to embrace political reform and by the West's long-standing misperceptions of China. Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.  SO

* EAST 347b / ER&M 365b / MUSI 347b / RLST 361b, Music in Indigenous Religions from Asia Rehanna Kheshgi

Examination of case studies from different parts of Asia to study the confluence of indigeneity, spirituality, and musical performance. Consideration of various perspectives on the meaning of indigenous sacred music by engaging with scholarship from disciplines ranging from ethnomusicology, anthropology, Asian Studies, and religious studies. Focus on series of monographs and engagement with field recordings, commercial music albums, fiction, and films from various parts of Asia.  HU

EAST 353a / HSAR 353a, Korean Art and Culture Youn-mi Kim

The history of Korea from ancient times to the present, with a focus on art and culture. Intersections of art, religion, and politics, as well as interaction with Chinese and Japanese cultures. The transmission of Buddhism and the formation of early Korean kingdoms; controversies regarding national identity; the premodern porcelain industry; Buddhism and Confucianism in politics and aesthetics; religion and art of the Japanese colonial period; contemporary popular culture. Includes a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  HU

EAST 375a / HIST 375a, China from Mao to Now Denise Ho

The history of the People's Republic of China from Mao to now, with a focus on understanding the recent Chinese past and framing contemporary events in China in historical context. How the party-state is organized; interactions between state and society; causes and consequences of economic disparities; ways in which various groups—from intellectuals to religious believers—have shaped the meaning of contemporary Chinese society.  HU

* EAST 401a / EALL 282a, Popular Culture in Motion Cindi Textor

Exploration of Korean and Japanese popular culture through a transnational lens —including literature, film, TV dramas, anime, manga, and pop music—in the twentieth century. Introduction of key concepts and debates in cultural studies of the Japanese empire and its contemporary vestiges in Japan and Korea.  HU

* EAST 402b / EALL 239b / ER&M 344b / THST 443b, Race, Gender, and Performance in East Asia Soo Ryon Yoon

Survey of contemporary performances in and around East Asia to more clearly understand the embodied processes in which racial and gendered social practices are shaped. Situating discussions in the specific political and cultural context of East Asia, students examine contemporary concert dance, K-pop idols, club and social dances, and protests and festivals in tandem with exploration of key concepts and theories.  HU

* EAST 403a / ANTH 402a, Recognition, Shame, and the State in Contemporary Japan Kuraudo Yamamoto

Exploration of the historical relation between the Japanese state and certain marginalized social groups, specifically the stigma which attaches to some groups and the role of the state in producing these stigmas. Social groups considered include: construction workers or day laborers of postwar recovery; the burakumin or outcaste class; resident foreigners, such as the Chinese and Koreans; Okinawans; Fukushima residents, radical leftists, and World War II comfort women.  SO

* EAST 404b / PLSC 396b, Contemporary State Building in Asia Marc Opper

Consideration of the legacies of war and revolution in China, Vietnam, Malaysia, and other areas of Southeast Asia. Exploration of the process and consequences of political strategies in wartime and the establishment of political institutions, with empirical focus on the Chinese Revolution and how the legacies of that conflict shaped the modern Chinese state.  SO

* EAST 405b / EP&E 498b / PLSC 157b, Japan and Human Rights in Asia Andre Asplund

Examination of human rights and democracy in East Asia through the lens of Japan's past and present role as a regional power. Students gain understanding of what increased competition with China for influence over Southeast Asian nations, as well as growing tension in the South China Sea, might entail for regional development, human rights implementation, and further democratization of the region.  SO

* EAST 408a / EP&E 269a / SOCY 395a, Wealth and Poverty in Modern China Deborah Davis

The underlying causes and consequences of the changing distribution of income, material assets, and political power in contemporary China. Substantive focus on inequality and stratification. Instruction in the use of online Chinese resources relevant to research. Optional weekly Chinese language discussions. Prerequisite: a previous course on China since 1949.  SO

* EAST 417a / ANTH 414a, Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities Helen Siu and William Kelly

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.  SORP

* EAST 454b / ECON 474b / GLBL 312b, Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan Stephen Roach

An evaluation of modern Japan's protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Policy blunders, structural growth impediments, bubbles, the global economic crisis of 2008, and Abenomics; risks of secular stagnation and related dangers to the global economy from subpar post-crisis recoveries. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries. Prerequisite: an introductory course in macroeconomics.  SO

* EAST 470a / HSAR 480a, The Arts of Nomads in China, 900–1400 Youn-mi Kim

Visual culture of the nomadic Kitans and Mongols, ranging from gold death masks and murals excavated from tombs to religious artworks that reflect hybrid and diverse religious practices. Arts produced during the empires founded by the Liao (907–1125) and Yuan (1279–1368) located in a broad transregional context, including their role in the cultural and political landscapes of East, Central, and South Asia from the tenth century to the fifteenth.  HU

EAST 480a or b, One-Term Senior Essay Frances Rosenbluth

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.

* EAST 491a and EAST 492b, Senior Research Project Frances Rosenbluth

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable. Credit for EAST 491 only on completion of EAST 492.  ½ Course cr per term

Electives within the Major

Premodern Period

* ANTH 362b, Unity and Diversity in Chinese Culture Helen Siu

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.
Anthropology: Sociocultural

CHNS 170a, Introduction to Literary Chinese I Michael Hunter

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style. After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.  L5

CHNS 171b, Introduction to Literary Chinese II Pauline Lin

Continuation of CHNS 170. After CHNS 170.  L5

EALL 200a / HUMS 270a, The Chinese Tradition Tina Lu and Lucas Bender

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops. No knowledge of Chinese required.  HUTr

EALL 203b / LITR 197b, The Tale of Genji Edward Kamens

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in "world literature." Attention will also be given to the text's special relationship to visual culture. No knowledge of Japanese required. A previous college-level course in the study of literary texts is recommended but not required.  WR, HUTr

EALL 210b / LITR 172b, Man and Nature in Chinese Literature Kang-i Sun Chang

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; neo-Taoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 200.   HUTr

EALL 211a / LITR 174a / WGSS 405a, Women and Literature in Traditional China Kang-i Sun Chang

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women's writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women's literature; problems of gender and genre. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.   HUTr

* EALL 302b, Readings in Classical Chinese Prose Kang-i Sun Chang

Close reading of classical Chinese texts (wenyan) primarily from late Imperial China. A selection of formal and informal prose, including memoirs, sanwen essays, classical tales, biographies, and autobiographies. Focus on cultural and historical contexts, with attention to reception in China and in some cases in Korea and Japan. Questions concerning readership and governmental censorship, function of literature, history and fictionality, memory and writing, and the aesthetics of qing (emotion). Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 302.   HU

* EALL 303a, Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry Kang-i Sun Chang

Study of successive appropriations and reorientation of Chinese poetic forms in the major genres, such as song lyric (ci) and vernacular lyric (qu) traditions, traced from early foundations to those written in later times. Topics include the creation of cultural values and identities, problems of authorship and authority, exile and poetic writing, reception, and material culture. Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 303.  HU

* EALL 308b / PHIL 410b, Sages of the Ancient World Michael Hunter

Comparative survey of ancient discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying.  HU

* HIST 307Jb, The Confucian Dilemma in the Later Centuries Annping Chin

How the political experience of the scholar-officials in China’s second millennium helped to revise and retool the relationship of self, society, and the state that Confucians had articulated in the previous centuries.    WR, HU

* HIST 308Jb, History and Politics in Early China Staff

How the history and politics of early China came to shape political thinking and policy debates in two thousand years of imperial rule.  WR, HU

HIST 373b, The Silk Road Valerie Hansen

A journey along the overland and sea routes that connected China, India, and Iran from 200 to 1000 C.E. and served as conduits for cultural exchange. The lives of merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers interacting in cosmopolitan communities. Exploration of long-known and newly discovered archaeological ruins, along with primary sources in translation.  WR, HU
History: Preindustrial

HSAR 353a / EAST 353a, Korean Art and Culture Youn-mi Kim

The history of Korea from ancient times to the present, with a focus on art and culture. Intersections of art, religion, and politics, as well as interaction with Chinese and Japanese cultures. The transmission of Buddhism and the formation of early Korean kingdoms; controversies regarding national identity; the premodern porcelain industry; Buddhism and Confucianism in politics and aesthetics; religion and art of the Japanese colonial period; contemporary popular culture. Includes a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  HU

HSAR 357a, Art and Architecture of Japan Mimi Yiengpruksawan

Survey of Japanese art and architecture from earliest times through the early nineteenth century. Introduction to paradigmatic monuments, with a focus on programmatic multimedia ensembles as found at Buddhist temples, Shinto shrines, Zen monastic enclaves, military installations and castles, vernacular living spaces, and public institutions of governance.  HU

* HSAR 480a / EAST 470a, The Arts of Nomads in China, 900–1400 Youn-mi Kim

Visual culture of the nomadic Kitans and Mongols, ranging from gold death masks and murals excavated from tombs to religious artworks that reflect hybrid and diverse religious practices. Arts produced during the empires founded by the Liao (907–1125) and Yuan (1279–1368) located in a broad transregional context, including their role in the cultural and political landscapes of East, Central, and South Asia from the tenth century to the fifteenth.  HU

* HSAR 488a, Buddhist Mandalas Mimi Yiengpruksawan

Study of Buddhist mandalas, objects such as paintings, relief sculptures, sand works, engravings on stone, and textiles that represent graphically what is written in scripture. Examination of Indian, Japanese, and Tibetan mandalas and the texts on which they are based. Focus on the intersection of text and image in the material or visual representation of Buddhist discourse.  HU

JAPN 170a, Introduction to Literary Japanese Edward Kamens

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts. After JAPN 151 or equivalent.  L5

* JAPN 171b, Readings in Literary Japanese Angelika Koch

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun. After JAPN 170 or equivalent.  L5

* RLST 182b / SAST 459b, Buddhist Traditions of Mind and Meditation Andrew Quintman

Buddhist meditation practices examined in the context of traditional theories of mind, perception, and cognition. Readings both from Buddhist canonical works and from secondary scholarship on cognitive science and ritual practice. Recommended preparation: a course in Asian religions.  HU

Modern Period

* ANTH 234b / WGSS 234b, Disability and Culture Elizabeth Miles

Exploration of disability from a cross-cultural perspective, using examples from around the globe. Disability as it relates to identity, culture, law, and politics. Case studies may include deafness in Japan, wheelchair mobility in the United States, and mental illness in the former Soviet republics.  SORP
Anthropology: Sociocultural

ANTH 254a, Japan: Culture, Society, Modernity Sarah LeBaron von Baeyer

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.  WR, SO
Anthropology: Sociocultural

* ANTH 342b, Cultures and Markets in Asia Helen Siu

Historical and contemporary movements of people, goods, and cultural meanings that have defined Asia as a region. Reexamination of state-centered conceptualizations of Asia and of established boundaries in regional studies. The intersections of transregional institutions and local societies and their effects on trading empires, religious traditions, colonial encounters, and cultural fusion. Finance flows that connect East Asia and the Indian Ocean to the Middle East and Africa. The cultures of capital and market in the neoliberal and postsocialist world.  SO
Anthropology: Sociocultural

* ANTH 414a / EAST 417a, Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities Helen Siu and William Kelly

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.  SORP

* ARCH 341a / GLBL 253a / LAST 318a, Globalization Space Keller Easterling

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.  HU

EALL 255b, Japanese Modernism Seth Jacobowitz

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.  HU

* EALL 281a / FILM 304a, Japanese Cinema and Its Others Aaron Gerow

Critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analysis of how Japanese film and media historically represents “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and monstrous others like ghosts.  HU

* EALL 286b / HUMS 290b / LITR 285b / PORT 360b, The Modern Novel in Brazil and Japan Seth Jacobowitz

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism. No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required.  HUTr

* EALL 357a, Meiji Literature and Visual Culture Seth Jacobowitz

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice. No knowledge of Japanese required.  HUTr

* GLBL 312b / EAST 454b / ECON 474b, Economic and Policy Lessons from Japan Stephen Roach

An evaluation of modern Japan's protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Policy blunders, structural growth impediments, bubbles, the global economic crisis of 2008, and Abenomics; risks of secular stagnation and related dangers to the global economy from subpar post-crisis recoveries. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries. Prerequisite: an introductory course in macroeconomics.  SO
Global Affairs: Development

GLBL 318a / EAST 338a / ECON 338a, The Next China Stephen Roach

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China's need to embrace political reform and by the West's long-standing misperceptions of China. Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.  SO
Global Affairs: Development

HSAR 368b, Practices of Japanese Painting and Printmaking Mimi Yiengpruksawan

Introduction to the Japanese painting and print traditions that inform Western modernism. Definition of specific formats, approaches, styles, and transitions. Paintings and prints as artifacts and as imaginative spaces in which social and cultural meanings unfold and can be analyzed in comparative perspective.  HU

* PLSC 162a, Japan and the World Frances Rosenbluth

The historical development of Japan's international relations since the late Tokugawa period; World War II and its legacy; domestic institutions and foreign policy; implications for the United States; and interactions between nationalism and regionalism.  SO

* SOCY 086a, China in the Age of Xi Jinping Deborah Davis

An overview of the major social institutions in contemporary China, with a focus on the changing relationship between individual and society. Use of print and visual sources to explore the social consequences of China's recent retreat from socialism and its rapid integration into the global economy. May count toward the Sociology major as an intermediate course. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.  SO

* RLST 383a / SAST 467a, Biography in Asian Religions Andrew Quintman

The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography.  HU