East Asian Studies

Director of undergraduate studies: Frances Rosenbluth, 308 RKZ, 432-5256, frances.rosenbluth@yale.edu; ceas.yale.edu

In the East Asian Studies major, students focus on a country or an area within East Asia and concentrate their work in the humanities or the social sciences. The major offers a liberal education that serves as excellent preparation for graduate study or for business and professional careers in which an understanding of East Asia is essential.

The major in East Asian Studies is interdisciplinary, and students typically select classes from a wide variety of disciplines. The proposed course of study must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisite

The prerequisite to the major is completion of study at the L2 level of an East Asian language taught at Yale or the equivalent. 

Requirements of the Major

Beyond the prerequisite, the major consists of thirteen course credits, which may include up to six taken in a preapproved program of study abroad. Six course credits must be taken in East Asian language courses, including a course at the L4 level and one year of advanced study (L5) with readings in the East Asian language.

Beyond the language requirement, the major includes seven course credits, six in the country or area of concentration and one outside it. Of the course credits in the area of concentration, one must be in the premodern period, at least two must be seminars, and one is the senior requirement (see below). These courses are normally taken at Yale during the academic year, but with prior approval of the DUS the requirement may be fulfilled through successful course work undertaken elsewhere.

Credit/D/Fail A maximum of one course taken Credit/D/Fail may be counted toward the requirements of the major, with permission of the DUS.

Senior Requirement 

During the senior year, all students must satisfy a senior requirement consisting of a major research project that uses Chinese, Japanese, or Korean-language materials, reflects an up-to-date understanding of the region, and demonstrates a strong command of written English. This requirement can be met in one of three ways. Students may take a seminar that relates to the country or area of concentration, culminating in a senior thesis. Alternatively, students who are unable to write a senior essay in a seminar may complete a one-term senior essay in EAST 480 or a one-credit, two-term senior research project in EAST 491, 492 culminating in an essay. The adviser for the senior project should be a faculty member associated with the Council on East Asian Studies with a reading knowledge of the target language materials consulted for the essay.

Advising

Selection of courses Upon entering the major, students are expected to draw up an intellectually coherent sequence of courses in consultation with the DUS. They must consult with the DUS each term concerning their course schedules. They should identify as soon as possible a faculty adviser in their area of specialization. As a multidisciplinary program, East Asian Studies draws on the resources of other departments and programs in the University. Students are encouraged to examine the offerings of other departments in both the humanities and the social sciences, as well as residential college seminars, for additional relevant courses. The stated area of concentration of each student determines the relevance and acceptability of other courses. For a complete listing of courses approved for the major, see the Council on East Asian Studies Website.

Courses in the graduate and professional schools Qualified students may elect pertinent courses in the Graduate School and in some of the professional schools with permission of the instructor, the EAST DUS, and the director of graduate studies of the relevant department or the dean or registrar of the professional school.

Combined B.A./M.A. degree program Exceptionally able and well-prepared students may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. See "Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" in section K of the Academic Regulations. Interested students should consult the director of undergraduate studies prior to the fifth term of enrollment for specific requirements in East Asian Studies.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR

Prerequisite L2 level of an East Asian lang taught at Yale or the equivalent

Number of courses 13 course credits beyond prereq (incl senior req); up to 6 may be in preapproved study abroad

Distribution of courses 6 course credits in East Asian lang courses, incl 1 L4 course and 1 year at L5 level with readings in the lang; 6 addtl course credits in country or area of concentration, incl 1 in premodern era and 2 sems; 1 course credit on East Asia outside country or area of concentration

Senior requirement Senior sem culminating in senior thesis, or one-term senior essay in EAST 480, or one-credit, two-term senior research proj in EAST 491, 492

In the East Asian Studies (EAS) major, students focus on a country or an area within East Asia and concentrate their work in the humanities or the social sciences. The major offers a liberal education that serves as excellent preparation for graduate study or for business and professional careers in which an understanding of East Asia is essential.

As EAS is interdisciplinary, students typically select classes from a wide variety of disciplines. Council faculty offer classes in the departments of Anthropology, East Asian Languages & LiteraturesHistoryHistory of ArtPolitical ScienceReligious Studies, and Sociology. EAS draws on the resources of other departments and programs in the University, and students are encouraged to examine the offerings of other departments, as well as residential college seminars, for additional relevant courses in both the humanities and the social sciences. The proposed course of study must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUS).

First-year students who intend to major in East Asian Studies should begin language training as soon as possible. Completion of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean at the elementary level is prerequisite to the EAS major.

Prerequisites to the major

Many majors spend a term or a year studying in China, Japan, or Korea. With the approval of the DUS, credit for such study up to the equivalent of six Yale course credits may count toward the major. Information on a wide variety of approved study abroad programs is available from the Council on East Asian Studies, 320 Luce Hall, 432-3427, or on the Council’s Website.

FACULTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRAM OF EAST ASIAN STUDIES

Professors Daniel Botsman (History), Kang-i Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Fabian Drixler (History), Aaron Gerow (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies), Valerie Hansen (History), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Tina Lu (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Peter Perdue (History), Frances Rosenbluth (Political Science), Helen Siu (Anthropology), Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Comparative Literature), Anne Underhill (Anthropology), Mimi Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professors William Honeychurch (Anthropology), Michael Hunter (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Hwansoo Kim (Religious Studies), Chloe Starr (Divinity School)

Assistant Professors Lucas Bender (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Eric Greene (Religious Studies), Denise Ho (History), Seth Jacobowitz (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Daniel Mattingly (Political Science)

Senior Lecturer Pauline Lin (East Asian Languages & Literatures)

Lecturers Charles Chang, Gabrielle Niu, Young Sun Park, Michael Thornton 

Senior Lectors II Seungja Choi, Angela Lee-Smith​

Senior Lectors Hsiu-hsien Chan, Min Chen, Koichi Hiroe, Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Fan Liu, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Yu-lin Wang Saussy, Masahiko Seto, Jianhua Shen, Mari Stever, Wei Su, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu, Yongtao Zhang, William Zhou

Lector Aoi Saito

Courses

EAST 125a / RLST 125a / SAST 267a, Introduction to Buddhist Thought and PracticeEric Greene

Significant aspects of Buddhism as practiced mainly in India and South Asia, including philosophy and ethics, monastic and ascetic life, meditation and ritual practices, and the material culture of Buddhist societies. The Mahayana tradition that emerged in the first century B.C.E.; later forms of esoteric Buddhism known as tantra; the development of modern Buddhism in Asia and its manifestation in the West. Readings from Buddhist texts in translation.  HU
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

EAST 170a / ANTH 170a, Chinese Culture, Society, and HistoryCaroline Merrifield

Anthropological explorations of basic institutions in traditional and contemporary Chinese society. Topics include kinship and marriage, religion and ritual, economy and social stratification, state culture, socialist revolution, and market reform.  SO
TTh 10:30am-11:20am

EAST 310a / GLBL 309a / PLSC 357a, The Rise of ChinaDaniel Mattingly

Analysis of contemporary Chinese politics, with focus on how the country has become a major power and how the regime has endured. Topics include China's recent history, state, ruling party, economy, censorship, elite politics, and foreign policy.  SO
MW 1:30pm-2:20pm

* EAST 335b / RLST 135b, Zen BuddhismEric Greene

Survey of the history and teachings of Zen Buddhism in China and Japan. Emphasis on reading and interpretation of primary Zen texts in their historical and religious context, along with investigation of modern interpretations and appropriations of Zen in the West.  HU
F 1:30pm-3:20pm

EAST 338a / ECON 338a / GLBL 318a, The Next ChinaStephen Roach

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China's need to embrace political reform and by the West's long-standing misperceptions of China. Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.  SO
MW 10:30am-11:20am

* EAST 344b / PLSC 444b, Governing ChinaDaniel Mattingly

Advanced study of the domestic and international politics of China. Topics include China’s recent history, elite politics, the rule of law, censorship, propaganda, nationalism, trade, territorial disputes, and international security.  SO
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EAST 358b / EALL 256b / GLBL 251b / HUMS 272b / LITR 265b, China in the WorldJing Tsu

Recent headlines about China in the world, deciphered in both modern and historical contexts. Interpretation of new events and diverse texts through transnational connections. Topics include China and Africa, Mandarinization, labor and migration, Chinese America, nationalism and humiliation, and art and counterfeit. Readings and discussion in English.  HU
HTBA

* EAST 390a / RLST 102a, Atheism and BuddhismHwansoo Kim

A critical examination of atheism and religions (Buddhism), with a focus on intellectual, religious, philosophical, and scientific debates about God, the origin of the universe, morality, evolution, neuroscience, happiness, enlightenment, the afterlife, and karma. Readings selected from philosophical, scientific, and religious writings. Authors include some of the following: Charles Darwin, Bertrand Russell, Christopher Hitchins, Richard Dawkins, Deepak Chopra, Sam Harris, Owen Flanagan, Stephen Batchelor, and the Dalai Lama.   HU
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EAST 391a / EALL 296 / RLST 121a, Religion and Culture in KoreaHwansoo Kim

Introduction to Shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Christianity, and new religions in Korea from ancient times to the present. Examination of religious traditions in close relationships with social, economic, political, and cultural environments in Korean society. Examination of religious tensions, philosophical arguments, and ethical issues that indigenous and foreign religions in Korea have engaged throughout history to maximize their influence in Korean society.   HU
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EAST 392b / RLST 357b / WGSS 359b, Buddhism and SexualityHwansoo Kim

Critical examination of the relation of religion and sexuality with special attention to Buddhism. Discussion of religious interpretations of sex, sexuality, and gender; the codification and normalization of these rules through texts, symbols, and practices; and recent challenges to these interpretations. Topics include homosexuality, same-sex marriage, abortion, contraception, gender equality, clerical marriage, married clerics' wives, and clerical sexual abuse. Draws on religious theory, gender theory, and critical theory. Places Buddhism in conversation with Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions.  HU
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EAST 393b / EALL 294b / RLST 344b, Death and the Afterlife in Chinese CulturesKelsey Seymour

This seminar explores ideas surrounding death in China and Taiwan, including retribution, the afterlife, and ghosts in Chinese religious traditions. To investigate this, we turn to religious scriptures, mortuary items, documentaries, and scholarly writings, and ask ourselves the following questions: How do concepts of the afterlife reflect and affect the situations of the living? How do the living maintain a relationship with the dead?  HU
MW 11:35am-12:50pm

* EAST 401a / HIST 305Ja / WGSS 401a, Gender in Modern Korea: History and RepresentationYoung Sun Park

This seminar examines the cinematic representation of Korean masculinity and femininity through history: from the appearance of the New Woman in the early twentieth century to the commercialized woman under the wave of neoliberalism more recently. By contextualizing these themes within the history of modern Korea, this class introduces students to major filmic texts and encourages them to historicize the dominant representations of gender by identifying the relevant, preferred categories and aesthetics of particular periods. Students are expected to engage in critical reading, analysis, and writing. Students also analyze and interpret the cinematic depictions to ask how these films illuminate issues of gender within the context of major historical themes such as national identity, external relations, and political and social conflict. Korean history presents a special opportunity for such an exercise because of South Korea’s very sophisticated popular culture industry, and because of this industry’s welcome dedication to re-imagining historical figures, events, and settings.   HU
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* EAST 402b / HSAR 477b, Chinese Art and Archaeology at the Yale University Art GalleryStaff

This course is a study of major works in Chinese art and archaeology, as well as an investigation into collection history at the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG). The course moves chronologically through major periods and sites of Chinese art and archaeology, with special attention paid to those represented by works in the YUAG. Classroom sessions are based on discussion and readings of primary texts in translation and secondary scholarship, while museum sessions involve close visual analysis and discussion of objects either in the galleries or object study classrooms (OSC). During museum sessions, students also examine the provenance of objects and associated archival materials. Students learn about the history of collecting Chinese objects throughout the 20th century and its relationship to the University.  HU
Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

* EAST 403b / ANTH 405b / SOCY 309b, Digital China: Using Computational Methods to Illuminate Society, Politics, Culture, and HistoryCharles Chang

In the humanities and social sciences, those who study China face a vast volume of disparate information that ranges from historical archives and maps to the news and social media posts of our time. Such abundance and variety of data can seem daunting, quite beyond an individual’s capacity to digest, and yet, with appropriate concepts and methods, the data can be accessed and sorted out in such a way as to allow the researcher to address questions, hitherto neglected or insufficiently analyzed, in Chinese history, politics, society, and culture. The course has two components: seminar and workshop. In the seminar, we discuss the ideas and concepts behind the collection of data, which could be temporal, spatial, or textual; this is followed by an introduction to network analysis and visualization. In the workshop, students gain hands-on experience in the full actualization of a project. Note that although the course’s title is “Digital China,” its ideas and methods are applicable to other non-Western countries. Students whose research interest lies in, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, or Africa are welcome.  SO
W 3:30pm-5:20pm

* EAST 404b / EVST 403b / HIST 369Jb, The City in Modern East AsiaStaff

Cities in East Asia developed into cosmopolitan urban centers in the modern era. They hosted encounters with Western empires and witnessed the rise of new forms of participatory politics; they not only reflected the broader efforts of their respective nation-states to modernize and industrialize, but also produced violent reactions against state regimes. They served as nodes in networks of migrants, commerce, and culture that grew more extensive in the modern era. In these ways, the history of East Asian urbanism is the history of the fluidity and dynamism of urban society and politics in the context of an increasingly interconnected modern world. We study cosmopolitan cities across East Asia from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. A comparative approach allows us to explore both general trends and themes, and distinct historical experiences across the countries of the region. Specific seminar topics include: urban politics, including state-society relations; cities as sites of geopolitical and imperial encounters; changes in urban society, including the impact of migration and social conflict; the urban environment, including natural and man-made disasters; urban planning, at the local, national and transnational scale; and ways of visualizing the city.  HU
M 3:30pm-5:20pm

* EAST 405a / MUSI 476a / THST 326a, Chinese OperaKelsey Seymour

This course introduces students to varieties of Chinese opera through plays, Chinese theories of music and acting, modern scholarship, and recorded media. Furthermore, students learn strategies to evaluate written and performed aspects of Chinese opera in a manner that can be extended to Western opera, film, and other performed genres.  HU
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EAST 407b / GLBL 533b / PLSC 747b, The Political Economy of Reform in ChinaStaff

Intended for graduate students and upper year undergraduates, this class seeks to explain how politics and the evolution of political institutions help explain the patterns and outcomes of major economic reforms in a single-party authoritarian state. While the focus is on China, important themes in political economy will be drawn and discussed.
HTBA

* EAST 417b / ANTH 414b, Hubs, Mobilities, and World CitiesHelen Siu

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.  SORP
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EAST 454b / ECON 474b / GLBL 312b, Economic and Policy Lessons from JapanStephen Roach

An evaluation of modern Japan's protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Policy blunders, structural growth impediments, bubbles, the global economic crisis of 2008, and Abenomics; risks of secular stagnation and related dangers to the global economy from subpar post-crisis recoveries. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries. Prerequisite: an introductory course in macroeconomics.  SO
HTBA

EAST 480a or b, One-Term Senior EssayFrances Rosenbluth

Preparation of a one-term senior essay under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Students must receive the prior agreement of the director of undergraduate studies and of the faculty member who will serve as the senior essay adviser. Students must arrange to meet with that adviser on a regular basis throughout the term.
HTBA

* EAST 491a and EAST 492b, Senior Research ProjectFrances Rosenbluth

Two-term directed research project under the supervision of a ladder faculty member. Students should write essays using materials in East Asian languages when possible. Essays should be based on primary material, whether in an East Asian language or English. Summary of secondary material is not acceptable. Credit for EAST 491 only on completion of EAST 492.  ½ Course cr per term
HTBA

Electives within the Major

Premodern Period

* ANTH 362b, Unity and Diversity in Chinese CultureHelen Siu

An exploration of the Chinese identity as it has been reworked over the centuries. Major works in Chinese anthropology and their intellectual connections with general anthropology and historical studies. Topics include kinship and marriage, marketing systems, rituals and popular religion, ethnicity and state making, and the cultural nexus of power.
M 1:30pm-3:20pm

* ANTH 397b / ARCG 397b, Archaeology of East AsiaAnne Underhill

Introduction to the findings and practice of archaeology in China, Japan, Korea, and southeast Asia. Methods used by archaeologists to interpret social organization, economic organization, and ritual life. Attention to major transformations such as the initial peopling of an area, establishment of farming villages, the development of cities, interregional interactions, and the nature of political authority.  SO
T 9:25am-11:15am

CHNS 170a, Introduction to Literary Chinese IPauline Lin

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style. After CHNS 151, 153, or equivalent.  L5
TTh 9am-10:15am

CHNS 171b, Introduction to Literary Chinese IIYun Bai

Continuation of CHNS 170. After CHNS 170.  L5
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

EALL 200a / CHNS 200a / EAST 240 / HUMS 270a, The Chinese TraditionTina Lu and Yongtao Zhang

An introduction to the literature, culture, and thought of premodern China, from the beginnings of the written record to the turn of the twentieth century. Close study of textual and visual primary sources, with attention to their historical and cultural backdrops. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 join a weekly Mandarin-language discussion section. No knowledge of Chinese required for students enrolled in EALL 200. Students enrolled in CHNS 200 must have L5 proficiency in Mandarin or permission of the course instructor.  HUTr
MW 10:30am-11:20am

EALL 206b / EAST 250 / HSAR 206b / LITR 175b, Japan's Classics in Text and ImageEdward Kamens and Mimi Yiengpruksawan

An introduction to the Japanese classics (poetry, narrative fiction, drama) in their manifestations in multiple media, especially in the visual and material realm. Special reference to and engagement with a simultaneous Yale University Art Gallery installation of rare books, paintings, and other works of art from Japan.  No knowledge of Japanese required. Formerly JAPN 200.  WR, HUTr
TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

EALL 211a / EAST 241 / LITR 174a / WGSS 405a, Women and Literature in Traditional ChinaKang-i Sun Chang

A study of major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. The power of women's writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; footbinding; notions of love and death; the aesthetics of illness; women and revolution; poetry clubs; the function of memory in women's literature; problems of gender and genre. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. Formerly CHNS 201.   HUTr
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* EALL 302a / EAST 341, Readings in Classical Chinese ProseKang-i Sun Chang

Close reading of classical Chinese texts (wenyan) primarily from late Imperial China. A selection of formal and informal prose, including memoirs, sanwen essays, classical tales, biographies, and autobiographies. Focus on cultural and historical contexts, with attention to reception in China and in some cases in Korea and Japan. Questions concerning readership and governmental censorship, function of literature, history and fictionality, memory and writing, and the aesthetics of qing (emotion). Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Formerly CHNS 302.   HU
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

HIST 321b / EAST 220, China from Present to Past, 2015–600Valerie Hansen

Underlying causes of current issues facing China traced back to their origins in the premodern period. Topics include economic development, corruption, environmental crises, gender, and Pacific island disputes. Selected primary-source readings in English, images, videos, and Web resources. *Optional additional Chinese-language and English-language sections.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:20pm

* HSAR 480b, Women ArtistsCarol Armstrong

This seminar focuses on women artists of the 19th and 20th centuries in Western Europe and the United States, while also looking back to the Renaissance through the 18th centuries, and forward to our own "global" moment. Beginning with the advent of feminist art history, it moves chronologically, intertwining the history of women artists with such questions as: What are the pros and cons of singling out women artists? What were the institutional restraints on women's entering the the canon of "great" art? How did conceptions of "femininity," female agency, and the "male gaze" intersect with the history of art by women? How did women's roles as artist's patrons or models inflect their own or others' activities as artists? How did the political revolutions of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries change things for women artists? How did the public and private spheres of modernity shape the role of women in the story of "modernism"? How did the first, second, and third waves of feminism address the problem of the women artist? How did/do matters of sex and gender intersect with those of race and class in the identity politics of contemporary world art? What is feminist art?  HU
Th 9:25am-11:15am

JAPN 170a, Introduction to Literary JapaneseEdward Kamens

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts. After JAPN 151 or equivalent.  L5
TTh 9am-10:15am

* JAPN 171b, Readings in Literary JapaneseStaff

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through the Tokugawa periods: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction to kanbun. After JAPN 170 or equivalent.  L5
HTBA

Modern Period

ANTH 170a / EAST 170a, Chinese Culture, Society, and HistoryCaroline Merrifield

Anthropological explorations of basic institutions in traditional and contemporary Chinese society. Topics include kinship and marriage, religion and ritual, economy and social stratification, state culture, socialist revolution, and market reform.  SO
TTh 10:30am-11:20am

ANTH 254a, Japan: Culture, Society, ModernitySarah LeBaron von Baeyer

Introduction to Japanese society and culture. The historical development of Japanese society; family, work, and education in contemporary Japan; Japanese aesthetics; and psychological, sociological, and cultural interpretations of Japanese behavior.  WR, SO
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

* ANTH 414b / EAST 417b, Hubs, Mobilities, and World CitiesHelen Siu

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.  SORP
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

* ARCH 341b / GLBL 253b / LAST 318b, Globalization SpaceKeller Easterling

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.  HU
MW 10:30am-11:20am

* EALL 252a / EAST 251 / FILM 446a / LITR 384a, Japanese Cinema before 1960Aaron Gerow

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s. No knowledge of Japanese required. Formerly JAPN 270.   HUTr
MW 1pm-2:15pm, T 7pm-10pm

EALL 255b / EAST 252, Japanese ModernismSeth Jacobowitz

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state.  HU
MW 1pm-2:15pm

* EALL 265b / EAST 253 / LITR 251b, Japanese Literature after 1970Stephen Poland

Study of Japanese literature published between 1970 and the present. Writers may include Murakami Ryu, Maruya Saiichi, Shimada Masahiko, Nakagami Kenji, Yoshimoto Banana, Yamada Eimi, Murakami Haruki, and Medoruma Shun. Enrollment limited to 20. No knowledge of Japanese required.  HU
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

* EALL 280a / EAST 260 / FILM 307a, East Asian Martial Arts FilmAaron Gerow

The martial arts film has not only been a central genre for many East Asian cinemas, it has been the cinematic form that has most defined those cinemas for others. Domestically, martial arts films have served to promote the nation, while on the international arena, they have been one of the primary conduits of transnational cinematic interaction, as kung-fu or samurai films have influenced films inside and outside East Asia, from The Matrix to Kill Bill. Martial arts cinema has become a crucial means for thinking through such issues as nation, ethnicity, history, East vs. West, the body, gender, sexuality, stardom, industry, spirituality, philosophy, and mediality, from modernity to postmodernity. It is thus not surprising that martial arts films have also attracted some of the world’s best filmmakers, ranging from Kurosawa Akira to Wong Kar Wai. This course focuses on films from Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea—as well as on works from other countries influenced by them—covering such martial arts genres such as the samurai film, kung-fu, karate, wuxia, and related historical epics. It provides a historical survey of each nation and genre, while connecting them to other genres, countries, and media.  HUTr
TTh 11:35am-12:25pm, W 7pm-10pm

* EALL 286a / EAST 261 / HUMS 290a / LITR 285a / PORT 360a, The Modern Novel in Brazil and JapanSeth Jacobowitz

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism. No knowledge of Portuguese or Japanese required.  HUTr
MW 4pm-5:15pm

* EALL 300a / EAST 340, Sinological MethodsPauline Lin

A research course in Chinese studies, designed for students with background in modern and literary Chinese. Exploration and evaluation of the wealth of primary sources and research tools available in Chinese. For native speakers of Chinese, introduction to the secondary literature in English and instruction in writing professionally in English on topics about China. Topics include the compilation and development of Chinese bibliographies; bibliophiles' notes; editions, censorship, and textual variation and reliability; specialized dictionaries; maps and geographical gazetteers; genealogies and biographical sources; archaeological and visual materials; and major Chinese encyclopedias and compendia. Prerequisite: CHNS 171 or equivalent. Formerly CHNS 202.   HU
F 1:30pm-3:20pm

* EALL 357a, Meiji Literature and Visual CultureSeth Jacobowitz

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice. No knowledge of Japanese required.  HUTr
MW 2:30pm-3:45pm

* ECON 442b, Microfoundations of Growth in ChinaXiaoxue Zhao

A comprehensive overview of the challenges China faces as it transitions from a centrally planned economy to adopting a greater reliance on market-based mechanisms. Review of microeconomic literature on China’s recent economic and institutional transformation to provide a general analytical framework for understanding the economic implications of the process. Prerequisites: intermediate microeconomics and econometrics.  SO
W 1:30pm-3:20pm

* GLBL 312b / EAST 454b / ECON 474b, Economic and Policy Lessons from JapanStephen Roach

An evaluation of modern Japan's protracted economic problems and of their potential implications for other economies, including the United States, Europe, and China. Policy blunders, structural growth impediments, bubbles, the global economic crisis of 2008, and Abenomics; risks of secular stagnation and related dangers to the global economy from subpar post-crisis recoveries. Focus on policy remedies to avert similar problems in other countries. Prerequisite: an introductory course in macroeconomics.  SO
T 3:30pm-5:20pm

GLBL 318a / EAST 338a / ECON 338a, The Next ChinaStephen Roach

Economic development in China since the late 1970s. Emphasis on factors pushing China toward a transition from its modern export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. The possibility of a resulting identity crisis, underscored by China's need to embrace political reform and by the West's long-standing misperceptions of China. Prerequisite: introductory macroeconomics.  SO
MW 10:30am-11:20am